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Leo Fuchs

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
In our different ways we are all one-man, one-woman shows. We play out our roles, take our falls, get up again and wait for the flowers. The applause, too. Then there's Leo Fuchs, a professional one-man show himself. His long life has been a succession of singular performances--so many years ago as a 5-year-old playing a bearded midget on a Polish stage, two years ago alone at Pasadena's Ambassador Auditorium, more recently as one of the Krichinsky brothers in the movie "Avalon."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every picture tells a story. And photographer Leo Fuchs has a story for every one of his pictures. Before he became a movie producer ("Gambit," "Malone"), Fuchs was one of the world's leading "special photographers" on movie sets in Europe and North America in the 1950s and early '60s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every picture tells a story. And photographer Leo Fuchs has a story for every one of his pictures. Before he became a movie producer ("Gambit," "Malone"), Fuchs was one of the world's leading "special photographers" on movie sets in Europe and North America in the 1950s and early '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
In our different ways we are all one-man, one-woman shows. We play out our roles, take our falls, get up again and wait for the flowers. The applause, too. Then there's Leo Fuchs, a professional one-man show himself. His long life has been a succession of singular performances--so many years ago as a 5-year-old playing a bearded midget on a Polish stage, two years ago alone at Pasadena's Ambassador Auditorium, more recently as one of the Krichinsky brothers in the movie "Avalon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2000
Shirley Kassler Ulmer, 86, who wrote the screenplay for "American Matchmaker," a Yiddish film made by her late husband, the legendary film director Edgar G. Ulmer. Besides acting as script supervisor for all of her husband's films, she also assisted on several of his screenplays and wrote novels and original scripts, including "American Matchmaker," under the name Shirle Castle.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2010
Still searching for that perfect gift for your brother-in-law or a persnickety client? Coffee-table books might fit the bill, what with that suitable heft and an undeniable quotient of cool. Here we offer a few last-minute selections for those gaps on your list: Beginnings Anne Geddes Anne Geddes Publishing, $50 The Aussie photographer was contemplating a hiatus from her studio when she came across an exhibit of birds' nests. This unexpected encounter turned into the inspiration for her latest collection of baby photos, "Beginnings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2009 | Adam Bernstein
Bernie Fuchs, an illustrator whose influential work for magazines ranging from Cosmopolitan to Sports Illustrated seamlessly blended qualities of traditional narrative with hints of abstract composition, died of esophageal cancer Sept. 17 at a care facility in Fairfield, Conn. He was 76. Fuchs met the needs of mass-circulation magazines accustomed to Norman Rockwell-style realism, but he injected a fresh vitality and impressionism that became hugely popular and transformed the illustration field.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Before he was a Yiddish star, Leo Fuchs was a Polish star. "My parents were Yiddish actors," said Fuchs, who arrives Saturday at Ambassador Auditorium in his one-man show "Laughter on Second Avenue"--for one night only. "My first part was in my father's act when I was 5: I played a midget with a beard and a top hat named Moses." Twenty years later, at the height of fame in Poland, the actor was invited to star in the musical "Lucky Boy" in New York's Yiddish theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1991 | T. H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for Valley/Westside Calendar.
How you gonna keep him down on the farm once he's seen Rome and felt the "continental air"? For Sicilian bachelor and land owner Don Cola, the answer is simple. Bring a piece of that sophistication back home with him in the person of a beautiful singer, who might just be willing to, well, become his, if the family doesn't get too upset. It's an old-fashioned plot, with some commedia dell'arte twists and turns and a fascinating theatrical history.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990
How can you tell fall has arrived in eternally sunny Southern California? Well, one way is by the start of the autumn arts and entertainment season. This special fall preview section provides listings of events from today through the end of the year and our critics' picks for the best bets in film, pop music, jazz, stage, music and dance and the visual arts. (Some box-office telephone numbers may not be in operation yet.) Pacific Heights (Friday).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1990 | KIRK HONEYCUTT
Ah, fall . . . . An adult can safely venture back to the movie theaters. The body-count films of summer yield their spaces for more thoughtful and prestigious fare. Generalizations? Hardly. Any season that features work by such stellar directors as Martin Scorsese, Barry Levinson, Mike Nichols, James Ivory and Philip Kaufman, to name a few, leads to higher expectations. "Films do change in the fall," said Tom Sherak, 20th Century Fox's marketing and distribution president.
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