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Leo Hindery

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SPORTS
March 15, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Stanley Gold and Leo Hindery, the leaders of the two Dodgers bid groups rejected by Major League Baseball, will appeal to a court-appointed mediator, two people familiar with the process said Thursday. Joseph Farnan, the mediator overseeing the sale of the Dodgers for the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, is scheduled to hear from Gold and Hindery on Monday, the people said. Farnan is expected to rule Tuesday. The 30 major league owners are expected to vote to approve or reject all remaining bidders next Thursday or Friday.
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SPORTS
March 15, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Stanley Gold and Leo Hindery, the leaders of the two Dodgers bid groups rejected by Major League Baseball, will appeal to a court-appointed mediator, two people familiar with the process said Thursday. Joseph Farnan, the mediator overseeing the sale of the Dodgers for the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, is scheduled to hear from Gold and Hindery on Monday, the people said. Farnan is expected to rule Tuesday. The 30 major league owners are expected to vote to approve or reject all remaining bidders next Thursday or Friday.
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SPORTS
January 29, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Tom Barrack has partnered with Leo Hindery on a bid for the Dodgers, bringing together a prominent Los Angeles billionaire with the founder of the New York Yankees' cable channel. The alliance was disclosed Sunday by a person familiar with the Dodgers sale process but not authorized to discuss it. Hindery and fellow New York financier Marc Utay lead one of at least eight groups that survived Friday's first cut among the bidders. That group had been one of the two prospective buyers known to remain in the bidding without a significant tie to Los Angeles.
SPORTS
January 29, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Tom Barrack has partnered with Leo Hindery on a bid for the Dodgers, bringing together a prominent Los Angeles billionaire with the founder of the New York Yankees' cable channel. The alliance was disclosed Sunday by a person familiar with the Dodgers sale process but not authorized to discuss it. Hindery and fellow New York financier Marc Utay lead one of at least eight groups that survived Friday's first cut among the bidders. That group had been one of the two prospective buyers known to remain in the bidding without a significant tie to Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reversal of strategy that signals continuing management turmoil, Seagram Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr. is searching for a high-level executive to oversee the entertainment assets bought by his family's liquor conglomerate four years ago. Sources close to Seagram say Leo Hindery Jr., who is credited with saving Tele-Communications Inc.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Global Crossing Ltd. unexpectedly replaced its chief executive Thursday after only a year, naming in his place a respected cable executive known for astute deal making and visionary leadership. Global Crossing Chief Executive Robert Annunziata will be immediately replaced by Leo J. Hindery Jr., who joined the company in December as chairman and chief executive of GlobalCenter Inc., the Sunnyvale, Calif., Internet services business.
OPINION
September 6, 2008
Re "Renewing the contract," Opinion, Sept. 1 I was in college in the early 1960s, the heyday of American liberalism. One day in economics class, a student asked rather impertinently why we weren't studying Marx's economic theory along with the rest. The professor replied that there was no need to. Marx's theory of working-class impoverishment had been disproved by the rise of organized labor, the Wagner Act and a thriving middle class. Now, looking over an article like Leo Hindery's with its alarmingly divisive statistics and the social trends they represent, I begin to wonder who was right after all. Doug Doepke Claremont -- Hindery writes that the American dream is intimately connected to corporate operations.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Telecommunications upstart Global Crossing said Monday it has hired former AT&T executive Leo J. Hindery Jr. to run its GlobalCenter Internet services operation. As chairman and chief executive of Sunnyvale-based GlobalCenter unit, Hindery, 52, will lead the expansion of one of the world's largest hosts of Web sites and other behind-the-scenes services that make e-commerce possible.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1997 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER
When Leo Hindery showed up for his first day on the job as the new president of Tele-Communications Inc., his arm was wired in three places from falling on the over-buffed floor of his old office. The break is so severe it could keep Hindery from his passion, racing stock cars, and he has steadily been forcing small movements in his fingers to restore the flexibility needed to get him back on the track.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a turbulent seven-month tenure marked by continued conflicts with his boss and associates, AT&T's key cable executive, Leo J. Hindery Jr., is leaving the company in what could be a setback for the long-distance giant's transformation into a cable-based enterprise.
OPINION
September 6, 2008
Re "Renewing the contract," Opinion, Sept. 1 I was in college in the early 1960s, the heyday of American liberalism. One day in economics class, a student asked rather impertinently why we weren't studying Marx's economic theory along with the rest. The professor replied that there was no need to. Marx's theory of working-class impoverishment had been disproved by the rise of organized labor, the Wagner Act and a thriving middle class. Now, looking over an article like Leo Hindery's with its alarmingly divisive statistics and the social trends they represent, I begin to wonder who was right after all. Doug Doepke Claremont -- Hindery writes that the American dream is intimately connected to corporate operations.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2002 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
A former chief executive who served just seven months at the helm of Global Crossing Ltd. is pressing the company to cough up back rent on a Park Avenue apartment and salary payments he says are owed to him. The $822,000 request from Leo J. Hindery Jr., who served as Global Crossing's third CEO, includes payments to cover the $22,000 monthly rent on his former two-bedroom apartment in the Waldorf-Astoria, known for its famous tenants. Hindery moved out of the apartment in June.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Global Crossing Ltd. today is expected to announce the resignation of Chief Executive Leo J. Hindery Jr., who becomes the second CEO to leave the upstart telecommunications firm in less than a year. The unexpected departure of Hindery, a 15-year veteran who brought a mix of deal-making and communications industry expertise to the young company, is likely to further rattle beleaguered investors in Global Crossing.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Global Crossing Ltd. unexpectedly replaced its chief executive Thursday after only a year, naming in his place a respected cable executive known for astute deal making and visionary leadership. Global Crossing Chief Executive Robert Annunziata will be immediately replaced by Leo J. Hindery Jr., who joined the company in December as chairman and chief executive of GlobalCenter Inc., the Sunnyvale, Calif., Internet services business.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Telecommunications upstart Global Crossing said Monday it has hired former AT&T executive Leo J. Hindery Jr. to run its GlobalCenter Internet services operation. As chairman and chief executive of Sunnyvale-based GlobalCenter unit, Hindery, 52, will lead the expansion of one of the world's largest hosts of Web sites and other behind-the-scenes services that make e-commerce possible.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a turbulent seven-month tenure marked by continued conflicts with his boss and associates, AT&T's key cable executive, Leo J. Hindery Jr., is leaving the company in what could be a setback for the long-distance giant's transformation into a cable-based enterprise.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
There are frequent fliers, and then there are people like Steven Rothstein and Jacques Vroom. Both men bought tickets that gave them unlimited first-class travel for life on American Airlines. It was almost like owning a fleet of private jets. Passes in hand, Rothstein and Vroom flew for business. They flew for pleasure. They flew just because they liked being on planes. They bypassed long lines, booked backup itineraries in case the weather turned, and never worried about cancellation fees.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If John Malone has been the Darth Vader of Tele-Communications Inc.--as Vice President Al Gore once dubbed the TCI chief--Leo Hindery Jr. has been the cable giant's Jedi Knight, skillfully maneuvering around both Wall Street and Washington. The force has been with him: In less than 18 months as president of TCI, he has been instrumental in turning around the company's lagging stock.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reversal of strategy that signals continuing management turmoil, Seagram Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr. is searching for a high-level executive to oversee the entertainment assets bought by his family's liquor conglomerate four years ago. Sources close to Seagram say Leo Hindery Jr., who is credited with saving Tele-Communications Inc.
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