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Leo Penn

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NEWS
September 10, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leo Penn, actor and veteran television director who earned an Emmy for directing a two-hour episode of "Columbo," has died. He was 77. Penn, patriarch of a performing family that includes son Sean, died Saturday in Los Angeles of cancer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
EXCLUSIVE: “Late Bloomer” is one of those conceits for a movie you wish you'd thought of yourself: a man in his late 20s who's never gone through puberty, then experiences it all in one head-spinning rush after a corrective surgery. The best part is it's true. Based on Ken Baker's memoir “Man Made,” “Late Bloomer” tells of an adult who seems to experience no sexual or hormonal feelings. He is flummoxed by his lack of desire, then discovers he has a tumor on his pituitary gland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
Logically, you know it has to be--but somehow, you just don't think of Sean Penn as having parents. You imagine him suddenly materializing in Los Angeles in the mid-'80s, full-grown and dangerous, just in time to punch out a photographer for trying to shoot a picture of Madonna.
BOOKS
February 27, 2005 | Douglas Brinkley, Douglas Brinkley is distinguished professor of history and director of the Theodore Roosevelt Center for American Civilization at Tulane University in New Orleans and is the author of biographies on Jimmy Carter, Rosa Parks and John F. Kerry.
Back in 1986, when the Iran-Contra scandal became news, Rhino Records reissued a Phil Ochs CD titled "A Toast to Those Who Are Gone." A fiery troubadour of the 1960s best known for "I Ain't Marchin' Anymore," Ochs was also a political activist who not only had denounced the Vietnam War at home but had traveled to Chile, South Africa and Tanzania to promote world peace, inspiring the FBI to amass a 410-page file on his six-string dissent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1986
The "Brat Packers" simply do not merit the attention they are getting. Merit is the central issue here. The only dues Sean Penn ever paid was to have actor/director Leo Penn as his father. Ditto Timothy Hutton, Nicolas Cage (Francis Coppola's nephew, I believe) and Emilio-I-did-it-all-on-my-own-Estevez-Sheen and scores of other snotty-nosed, no-talent don't-take-my-picture-jerks who make it because of nepotism. The Robert Duvalls and Rip Torns of today have little chance to prove their worth in a market filled with industry brats.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1987 | From Leonard Klady \f7
So what's this big role that got Sean Penn a temporary reprieve (until Aug. 1) from a 32-day jail sentence? A starring part in a major picture? Nope. Penn will be giving testimony--in a supporting role of a trial witness--in "Judgment in Berlin." The American-West German co-production, to start shooting Wednesday, is directed and co-written by dad Leo Penn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1998 | BOB HEISLER, NEWSDAY
A night in the recent life of Sean Penn, actor, son, director, husband, movie star, father, celebrity: The students file in with first-night expectation, squinting into the television lights, shifting seats to find the best sight line and the best chance of appearing on camera. Offstage, Sean Penn is reported calm, his wife and frequent co-star, actress Robin Wright Penn, nervous. She'll sit with the audience for that night's taping of the Bravo series "Inside the Actors Studio."
BOOKS
February 27, 2005 | Douglas Brinkley, Douglas Brinkley is distinguished professor of history and director of the Theodore Roosevelt Center for American Civilization at Tulane University in New Orleans and is the author of biographies on Jimmy Carter, Rosa Parks and John F. Kerry.
Back in 1986, when the Iran-Contra scandal became news, Rhino Records reissued a Phil Ochs CD titled "A Toast to Those Who Are Gone." A fiery troubadour of the 1960s best known for "I Ain't Marchin' Anymore," Ochs was also a political activist who not only had denounced the Vietnam War at home but had traveled to Chile, South Africa and Tanzania to promote world peace, inspiring the FBI to amass a 410-page file on his six-string dissent.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2000 | NATALIE NICHOLS, Natalie Nichols is a regular contributor to Calendar
It's a sunny afternoon in Laurel Canyon, but things are a little stormy inside the home of singer-songwriters Aimee Mann and Michael Penn. The stress of a photo session has sent Penn out the front door in pursuit of a nicotine fix as his wife mildly objects. He returns almost immediately. "I only had one puff," he says. That's not so bad, he's told. "It is when it's your first day quitting," he replies sharply, clearly annoyed with himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2004 | James Verini, Special to The Times
As the light waned on a brisk fall afternoon, Sean Penn walked quickly into the barroom at the Peninsula Hotel in Beverly Hills in that slightly pigeon-toed half-swagger, and the heads of the patrons -- mostly women, as it happened -- turned in unison. Penn was wearing a black suit and gray shirt, was clean-shaven (once a rarity for him, but now increasingly the norm) and had his hair in a kind of 1930s-style sideburn-less blaze.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2004 | James Verini, Special to The Times
As the light waned on a brisk fall afternoon, Sean Penn walked quickly into the barroom at the Peninsula Hotel in Beverly Hills in that slightly pigeon-toed half-swagger, and the heads of the patrons -- mostly women, as it happened -- turned in unison. Penn was wearing a black suit and gray shirt, was clean-shaven (once a rarity for him, but now increasingly the norm) and had his hair in a kind of 1930s-style sideburn-less blaze.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2003 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
It is afternoon in Marin County, well past the lunch hour. In the Indian restaurant by the frontage road, the kitchen is about to close. There is the smell of curry and the sound of taped sitar music. In a corner, wondering whether the manager will bend the no-smoking law and let him fire up a cigarette at the table, Sean Penn is talking about work and life and these past 12 controversial months. "E.L.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2002 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, Times Staff Writer
Sean Penn doesn't believe in film preservation. He hates those hallowed classics like "The Grapes of Wrath" and " Gone With the Wind," a film he describes as "an abominable fraud of a movie." "I sometimes feel that they should just burn them all and start anew," he says. Penn giggles wickedly--a hoarse, breathy, gasping chortle. It's the first time in the last hour that a flash of mischievousness has animated his rough-hewn features.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2000 | NATALIE NICHOLS, Natalie Nichols is a regular contributor to Calendar
It's a sunny afternoon in Laurel Canyon, but things are a little stormy inside the home of singer-songwriters Aimee Mann and Michael Penn. The stress of a photo session has sent Penn out the front door in pursuit of a nicotine fix as his wife mildly objects. He returns almost immediately. "I only had one puff," he says. That's not so bad, he's told. "It is when it's your first day quitting," he replies sharply, clearly annoyed with himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1998 | BOB HEISLER, NEWSDAY
A night in the recent life of Sean Penn, actor, son, director, husband, movie star, father, celebrity: The students file in with first-night expectation, squinting into the television lights, shifting seats to find the best sight line and the best chance of appearing on camera. Offstage, Sean Penn is reported calm, his wife and frequent co-star, actress Robin Wright Penn, nervous. She'll sit with the audience for that night's taping of the Bravo series "Inside the Actors Studio."
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leo Penn, actor and veteran television director who earned an Emmy for directing a two-hour episode of "Columbo," has died. He was 77. Penn, patriarch of a performing family that includes son Sean, died Saturday in Los Angeles of cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2003 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
It is afternoon in Marin County, well past the lunch hour. In the Indian restaurant by the frontage road, the kitchen is about to close. There is the smell of curry and the sound of taped sitar music. In a corner, wondering whether the manager will bend the no-smoking law and let him fire up a cigarette at the table, Sean Penn is talking about work and life and these past 12 controversial months. "E.L.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2002 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, Times Staff Writer
Sean Penn doesn't believe in film preservation. He hates those hallowed classics like "The Grapes of Wrath" and " Gone With the Wind," a film he describes as "an abominable fraud of a movie." "I sometimes feel that they should just burn them all and start anew," he says. Penn giggles wickedly--a hoarse, breathy, gasping chortle. It's the first time in the last hour that a flash of mischievousness has animated his rough-hewn features.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
Logically, you know it has to be--but somehow, you just don't think of Sean Penn as having parents. You imagine him suddenly materializing in Los Angeles in the mid-'80s, full-grown and dangerous, just in time to punch out a photographer for trying to shoot a picture of Madonna.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1987 | From Leonard Klady \f7
So what's this big role that got Sean Penn a temporary reprieve (until Aug. 1) from a 32-day jail sentence? A starring part in a major picture? Nope. Penn will be giving testimony--in a supporting role of a trial witness--in "Judgment in Berlin." The American-West German co-production, to start shooting Wednesday, is directed and co-written by dad Leo Penn.
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