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Leo T Bishop Maher

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NEWS
April 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Roman Catholic Bishop Leo T. Maher, who drew widespread attention when he banned a pro-choice political candidate from receiving Communion last year, was in serious condition after surgery to remove a brain tumor. Maher, 74, was alert and able to talk soon after the 2 1/2-hour operation at Scripps Clinic. Doctors said they were optimistic he would recover, but expressed concern about the possible recurrence of the life-threatening tumor.
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NEWS
February 24, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bishop Leo T. Maher, the outspoken leader of the Diocese of San Diego for more than two decades, died at his Mission Hills home Saturday morning. Maher, 75, had undergone two surgeries for brain cancer last year. Maher ignited storms of controversy with his stands on homosexuality, birth control, pornography and abortion.
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NEWS
December 3, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second time in as many months, San Diego County voters will go to the polls Tuesday to decide a special state legislative campaign that has drawn national attention as a referendum on abortion. The special 39th Senate District election also will add a new chapter to the age-old debate over separation of church and state, thanks to a religious leader's controversial intrusion in the campaign: In mid-November, Roman Catholic Bishop Leo T.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR. and LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II on Tuesday accepted the resignation of ailing Bishop Leo T. Maher, who gained nationwide attention when he refused Communion to a political candidate because of her views on abortion, as head of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego. As expected, Bishop Robert H. Brom became the fourth leader of the diocese. It was also announced Tuesday that the Pope has accepted the resignation of the nation's highest-ranking black Roman Catholic clergyman, Archbishop Eugene A.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
Californians of every religion, including people who oppose abortion, believe that a Catholic bishop was out of line when he barred a San Diego assemblywoman from receiving Communion because of her pro-choice stand, The Times Poll has found. The fact that the assemblywoman, Democrat Lucy Killea, went on to score an upset victory in a state Senate race tends to substantiate another point illustrated by the poll: It helps when running for elective office in California to be pro-choice on abortion.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Catholic Bishop Leo T. Maher has barred Assemblywoman Lucy Killea from receiving Communion because of her pro-choice stand on abortion in a special state Senate campaign, apparently the first such action ever imposed by a bishop against a Catholic elected official in the United States over the abortion issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Catholic bishops often vary in their approaches to issues, but on the question of immigration the contrasts between church leaders in San Diego and Los Angeles have been vivid. In Los Angeles, Archbishop Roger M. Mahony has reached out extensively to the Spanish-speaking immigrant community, even holding a huge Mass in their honor at Dodger Stadium in 1986. Mahony, who speaks fluent Spanish, has been at the national forefront of immigrant issues, openly criticizing U.S.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bishop Leo T. Maher, the outspoken leader of the Diocese of San Diego for more than two decades, died at his Mission Hills home Saturday morning. Maher, 75, had undergone two surgeries for brain cancer last year. Maher ignited storms of controversy with his stands on homosexuality, birth control, pornography and abortion.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR. and LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II on Tuesday accepted the resignation of ailing Bishop Leo T. Maher, who gained nationwide attention when he refused Communion to a political candidate because of her views on abortion, as head of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego. As expected, Bishop Robert H. Brom became the fourth leader of the diocese. It was also announced Tuesday that the Pope has accepted the resignation of the nation's highest-ranking black Roman Catholic clergyman, Archbishop Eugene A.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Roman Catholic Bishop Leo T. Maher, who drew widespread attention when he banned a pro-choice political candidate from receiving Communion last year, was in serious condition after surgery to remove a brain tumor. Maher, 74, was alert and able to talk soon after the 2 1/2-hour operation at Scripps Clinic. Doctors said they were optimistic he would recover, but expressed concern about the possible recurrence of the life-threatening tumor.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
Californians of every religion, including people who oppose abortion, believe that a Catholic bishop was out of line when he barred a San Diego assemblywoman from receiving Communion because of her pro-choice stand, The Times Poll has found. The fact that the assemblywoman, Democrat Lucy Killea, went on to score an upset victory in a state Senate race tends to substantiate another point illustrated by the poll: It helps when running for elective office in California to be pro-choice on abortion.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second time in as many months, San Diego County voters will go to the polls Tuesday to decide a special state legislative campaign that has drawn national attention as a referendum on abortion. The special 39th Senate District election also will add a new chapter to the age-old debate over separation of church and state, thanks to a religious leader's controversial intrusion in the campaign: In mid-November, Roman Catholic Bishop Leo T.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Catholic Bishop Leo T. Maher has barred Assemblywoman Lucy Killea from receiving Communion because of her pro-choice stand on abortion in a special state Senate campaign, apparently the first such action ever imposed by a bishop against a Catholic elected official in the United States over the abortion issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Catholic bishops often vary in their approaches to issues, but on the question of immigration the contrasts between church leaders in San Diego and Los Angeles have been vivid. In Los Angeles, Archbishop Roger M. Mahony has reached out extensively to the Spanish-speaking immigrant community, even holding a huge Mass in their honor at Dodger Stadium in 1986. Mahony, who speaks fluent Spanish, has been at the national forefront of immigrant issues, openly criticizing U.S.
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