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Leon Bing

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August 11, 1991 | Walter Dean Myers, Myers has written 15 novels on the black experience for teen-agers
There is an ease connected with writing about people engaged in heavy criminal activity. The drama is already in place and the characters involved usually are different enough to appear exotic, perhaps even romantic. Now that the gang scene has raged into our attention, we can expect many books professing to be the "inside" story. Few of these books will get that story right. Leon Bing, a white woman, a former model, has got it right.
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September 12, 1993 | Rosellen Brown
These days people speak of "the secret life of teen-agers" as if they were contemplating the undersea mystery of dolphins or some exotic and dangerously beautiful man-eating plant. Is it really possible that we have so lost connection with our children that we're forced to contemplate them as a strange species known to us only in flashes?
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BOOKS
September 12, 1993 | Rosellen Brown
These days people speak of "the secret life of teen-agers" as if they were contemplating the undersea mystery of dolphins or some exotic and dangerously beautiful man-eating plant. Is it really possible that we have so lost connection with our children that we're forced to contemplate them as a strange species known to us only in flashes?
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month or so before the book tour, Bone took a bullet behind the heart. Bone, a retired member of the Bloods, recovered in time to help author Leon Bing promote "Do or Die," her new book about L.A.'s African-American gangs. Only thing was, the bullet, a hulking .45, came along for the ride, setting off airport security systems. "He'd been in the park talking to a couple of kids playing baseball. . . . He was ambushed. He has a big reputation as a gangster for the Bloods.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month or so before the book tour, Bone took a bullet behind the heart. Bone, a retired member of the Bloods, recovered in time to help author Leon Bing promote "Do or Die," her new book about L.A.'s African-American gangs. Only thing was, the bullet, a hulking .45, came along for the ride, setting off airport security systems. "He'd been in the park talking to a couple of kids playing baseball. . . . He was ambushed. He has a big reputation as a gangster for the Bloods.
HEALTH
November 10, 1997
Leon Bing Villard Books 285 pages, $25 This book tells a story that might be familiar to Southern Californians--and Los Angeles Times readers, in particular. Leon Bing, of Pasadena, recounts the institutionalization and death of Christy Scheck, a 13-year-old Chula Vista girl who committed suicide in 1992 in a psychiatric inpatient facility.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | IRENE LACHER
The recent surge in books and films examining the harsh realities of ghetto life has most notably included black filmmakers like Spike Lee and John Singleton, who have enjoyed boffo box office returns and the good graces of Hollywood. (Last year 19 movies were made by black filmmakers, more than the entire decade before). Also: * Edward James Olmos' recent film, "American Me," looked at gang life from the Latino perspective.
OPINION
August 11, 1991 | Leon Bing, L e on Bing has written cover stories on gang life for L.A. Weekly and Harper's magazine. She lives in Pasadena
The notorious Crips and Bloods gangs of South-Central Los Angeles exert a powerful hold on their members. Faro, 17 and homeless, spoke of his life with the author during a ride around the city. An excerpt. He is wearing shabby sweats and busted-down Nike high-tops. He is very thin; the bones of his wrists sticks knobbily out of the elastic cuffs of his hooded jacket, which is at least two sizes too small for him. We ride in silence for a while, and then I ask him about his family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1996 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Monster" Kody Scott, a former gang member who became a best-selling author, was captured by police while he was signing autographs on the porch of a South-Central Los Angeles house, almost three months after he fled parole agents who wanted to test him for drug use. When Los Angeles Police Department officers spotted Scott on Monday night, he ran through the house, but was caught before he could escape, said Sgt. Andrew Smith.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nothing about Bobby Lavender suggests he is "an OG, triple-X, first-generation" gangster--founding father of the set that later became the Bloods. "No big deal," Lavender demurs. " 'OG' simply stands for 'original gangster' "--a mark of respect bestowed upon former gang leaders who maintain their influence and reputation. A very big deal, others say.
BOOKS
August 11, 1991 | Walter Dean Myers, Myers has written 15 novels on the black experience for teen-agers
There is an ease connected with writing about people engaged in heavy criminal activity. The drama is already in place and the characters involved usually are different enough to appear exotic, perhaps even romantic. Now that the gang scene has raged into our attention, we can expect many books professing to be the "inside" story. Few of these books will get that story right. Leon Bing, a white woman, a former model, has got it right.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Teitelbaum is a frequent contributor to The Times.
When the riot broke out in Los Angeles on April 29, Ballantine Books publicity director Carol Fass was at a sales conference in Arizona. As she and her colleagues watched events unfold on television, one recalled the company had a title on backlist, "Black Protest: History, Documents and Analysis," a book that was published in 1965, reissued 16 times and was currently in storage. It might be an opportune time to move it back into bookstores.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Mick Jagger probably never expected to be on the cover of National Review, the conservative biweekly founded by William F. Buckley. And he probably never expected to be caricatured in quite this way--old, bald, hard of hearing and liver-spotted. National Review readers didn't expect to see him there, either.
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