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Leon Danco

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BUSINESS
November 24, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 10 years ago, Greg Grinnell tried working with his father, Bill, at Grinnell Associates, the family's West Los Angeles construction company. But the differences in age and experience drove them apart and the younger Grinnell left to work for Security Pacific, first as an international banker and later in the bank's real estate division. Then, 2 1/2 years ago, father and son began talking about working together again. "I realized then it was now or never," said Greg Grinnell.
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BUSINESS
November 24, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An assortment of gorillas, tarantulas and members of the "lucky sperm club" recently congregated around family business guru Leon Danco, eager to solve a myriad of problems plaguing their private companies. In Danco jargon, "gorillas" are men who marry the daughters of prosperous business owners, frequently causing trouble for the families. "Tarantulas" marry the sons of the owners and bring their own agendas into the families.
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BUSINESS
November 24, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An assortment of gorillas, tarantulas and members of the "lucky sperm club" recently congregated around family business guru Leon Danco, eager to solve a myriad of problems plaguing their private companies. In Danco jargon, "gorillas" are men who marry the daughters of prosperous business owners, frequently causing trouble for the families. "Tarantulas" marry the sons of the owners and bring their own agendas into the families.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 10 years ago, Greg Grinnell tried working with his father, Bill, at Grinnell Associates, the family's West Los Angeles construction company. But the differences in age and experience drove them apart and the younger Grinnell left to work for Security Pacific, first as an international banker and later in the bank's real estate division. Then, 2 1/2 years ago, father and son began talking about working together again. "I realized then it was now or never," said Greg Grinnell.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Wednesday airplane crash death of In-N-Out President Rich Snyder presents the family-owned fast food chain with a leadership challenge and transition questions at a strategic time in the company's 45-year history. In-N-Out is in the final stages of transferring its headquarters from Baldwin Park to Irvine, a transition scheduled for completion in February, 1994. Now, however, the more difficult transition involves unexpected changes in management and control.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1989 | Jane Applegate
Ask 2-year-old Jeffrey Gross what he wants to be when he grows up and he has a quick answer. "Sales manager," he'll say, as he scampers around a truck parked at Ideal Sales & Distribution Co., his parents' truck accessories business in City of Commerce. Jeffrey's father, Mark Gross, beams. Gross says he would like nothing better than for his son and 5-year-old daughter, Rachel, to follow him and his wife, Julie, into the family business. At 35, Mark Gross is president and owner of Ideal.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Wednesday airplane crash death of In-N-Out Burgers Inc. President Rich Snyder presents the family-owned fast-food chain with a leadership challenge and transition questions at a strategic time in the company's 45-year history. In-N-Out is in the final stages of transferring its headquarters from Baldwin Park to Irvine, a transition scheduled for completion in February. Now, however, the more difficult transition involves unexpected changes in management and control.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hinshaw's opened its doors Friday, the Arcadia retailer promoted its bargains with placards that have become signs of the times for more and more privately owned department stores--"Going Out of Business Sale." Large crowds milled in the aisles hunting for bargains. Long lines stretched from the cash registers. And the store's renowned service was slowed by the crush of shoppers, said Alvira Yates, a Hinshaw's devotee who will miss the local landmark.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1996 | VIVIAN MARINO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Quick. Name the largest corporate restructuring in America. It's happening now, will continue into the 21st century and involves businesses that employ as much as half the nation's work force and generate an estimated 40% of the gross domestic product. Last hint: Remember mom and pop. As in mom-and-pop business owners. Millions of family-run businesses--from corner shops to conglomerates--are undergoing the largest transfer of ownership from one generation to the next.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1999 | CYNDIA ZWAHLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His family was in over its head, Greg Lennox realized soon after he replaced his uncle as president and chief executive of the third-generation family business, P.L. Porter Co., in Woodland Hills.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1986 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Whenever anyone suggested that WD-40 Co. needed a second product, President Jack Barry always gave the same response: Why mess with success? By concentrating on its only product, WD-40 Co. last year sold $57.3 million of the versatile lubricant, penetrant and rust preventive that "stops squeaks, protects metal, loosens rusted parts and frees sticky mechanisms." Consequently, Barry raised some eyebrows when he recently indicated a willingness to consider adding a second product.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1990 | JANE APPLEGATE
After 36 years of making pierogies, stuffed Polish-style pasta pockets, Ted Twardzik figured it was time to sell the family owned business he began on his mother's kitchen table. By 1986, Ateeco Inc.'s 200 workers were producing four million pierogies a week. The company had become the largest employer in Shenandoah, an eastern Pennsylvania coal-mining town with a population of 7,000.
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