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July 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Pianist Leon Fleisher, who for three decades was unable to play with his right hand, has canceled a performance at Tanglewood in Massachusetts because of an inflammation of both hands. Fleisher was scheduled to play Beethoven's "Emperor" concerto on Sunday -- the day before his 80th birthday -- with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He will be replaced by Marc-Andre Hamelin, the orchestra said Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Pianist Leon Fleisher, who for three decades was unable to play with his right hand, has canceled a performance at Tanglewood in Massachusetts because of an inflammation of both hands. Fleisher was scheduled to play Beethoven's "Emperor" concerto on Sunday -- the day before his 80th birthday -- with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He will be replaced by Marc-Andre Hamelin, the orchestra said Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
For nearly 25 years, Leon Fleisher has made what seemed a career detour into a mainstream occupation. As a left-handed pianist--when Fleisher was 37, his right hand was made inoperative by a disorder later diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome--the American musician has successfully specialized in and expanded that repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Having risen like a phoenix back into the classical mainstream, pianist Leon Fleisher was ready to move on to new projects, like the cycle of Schubert violin/piano sonatas that he is performing with violinist Jaime Laredo. Yet Fleisher's 35-year-long battle to regain use of his right hand is a compelling story that will not let go -- and his all-Schubert concert at UCLA on Saturday night collided with a mass-media celebration of his triumph.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
An icon among American pianists, Leon Fleisher, at 72, is a legendary musical figure. But, as heard at the La Jolla SummerFest's "An Evening With Leon Fleisher" Wednesday night, his playing remains vivid, probing and altogether young. The frame for the event spotlighting this famous teacher of pianists (Fleisher has taught at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore since 1959) is this town's annual summer chamber music party; the August series ends with its 11th festival concert, Sunday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2006 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
Concluding a brief, two-stop California tour, the conductorless Orpheus Chamber Orchestra performed Monday night in the Irvine Barclay Theatre to a full house of ostensible connoisseurs -- "ostensible" because this audience never coughed, sneezed, rattled paper or misbehaved throughout the program. Such rapt attention is also characteristic of this 32-member ensemble's complete immersion in whatever music it plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Having risen like a phoenix back into the classical mainstream, pianist Leon Fleisher was ready to move on to new projects, like the cycle of Schubert violin/piano sonatas that he is performing with violinist Jaime Laredo. Yet Fleisher's 35-year-long battle to regain use of his right hand is a compelling story that will not let go -- and his all-Schubert concert at UCLA on Saturday night collided with a mass-media celebration of his triumph.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES
More than one generation of music lovers has regarded pianist Leon Fleisher--and particularly his work with George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra--as the stuff of legends. Thus, people felt heartsick when Fleisher's right hand became disabled in 1965, at the peak of his career. Fleisher, 62, subsequently turned to teaching, conducting and playing the one-hand repertory commissioned from Ravel and Prokofiev by Austrian pianist Paul Wittenstein, who had lost his right arm in World War I.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1990
HIV negative--A sentence in David Graham's letter (May 24) should have stated: As a gay man who is HIV negative, I am grateful to have escaped this scourge.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2007 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
IT'S about time Leon Fleisher came to Hollywood. His, after all, is a perfect movie story: a combination of epic tragedy and personal triumph, complete with an odds-defying ending. For more than 30 years, Fleisher dedicated himself to becoming one of America's greatest pianists -- until a mystery ailment rendered his right hand useless.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2007 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
IT'S about time Leon Fleisher came to Hollywood. His, after all, is a perfect movie story: a combination of epic tragedy and personal triumph, complete with an odds-defying ending. For more than 30 years, Fleisher dedicated himself to becoming one of America's greatest pianists -- until a mystery ailment rendered his right hand useless.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2006 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
Concluding a brief, two-stop California tour, the conductorless Orpheus Chamber Orchestra performed Monday night in the Irvine Barclay Theatre to a full house of ostensible connoisseurs -- "ostensible" because this audience never coughed, sneezed, rattled paper or misbehaved throughout the program. Such rapt attention is also characteristic of this 32-member ensemble's complete immersion in whatever music it plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
An icon among American pianists, Leon Fleisher, at 72, is a legendary musical figure. But, as heard at the La Jolla SummerFest's "An Evening With Leon Fleisher" Wednesday night, his playing remains vivid, probing and altogether young. The frame for the event spotlighting this famous teacher of pianists (Fleisher has taught at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore since 1959) is this town's annual summer chamber music party; the August series ends with its 11th festival concert, Sunday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1990
HIV negative--A sentence in David Graham's letter (May 24) should have stated: As a gay man who is HIV negative, I am grateful to have escaped this scourge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
For nearly 25 years, Leon Fleisher has made what seemed a career detour into a mainstream occupation. As a left-handed pianist--when Fleisher was 37, his right hand was made inoperative by a disorder later diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome--the American musician has successfully specialized in and expanded that repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES
More than one generation of music lovers has regarded pianist Leon Fleisher--and particularly his work with George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra--as the stuff of legends. Thus, people felt heartsick when Fleisher's right hand became disabled in 1965, at the peak of his career. Fleisher, 62, subsequently turned to teaching, conducting and playing the one-hand repertory commissioned from Ravel and Prokofiev by Austrian pianist Paul Wittenstein, who had lost his right arm in World War I.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1987
Music director Andre Previn, stricken with the flu, will not conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic in its current series of subscription concerts, tonight, Saturday and Sunday. The repertory, however, is unchanged. Assistant conductor David Alan Miller will conduct Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 4, with soloist Leon Fleisher, and Strauss' "Also sprach Zarathustra." Philharmonic new music adviser John Harbison will direct his own composition "Diotima."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1990
Pianist Leon Fleisher will conduct and appear as soloist with the Pacific Symphony on May 23 and 24 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Fleisher replaces Sergiu Comissiona, who bowed out of the engagement to assume his new duties as music director for the Vancouver Symphony. Fleisher was already scheduled to appear on those dates as soloist in Ravel's Concerto for the Left Hand.
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