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Leon Golub

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Artist Leon Golub, whose unflinchingly raw paintings of human depravity shattered the cool demeanor of the art world and established him as an effective champion of figurative expression, has died. He was 82. Golub died Sunday in New York of complications after undergoing surgery, his son Stephen Golub said. A longtime critic of the abuse of power, the artist sometimes called himself "a machine that turns out monsters."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Artist Leon Golub, whose unflinchingly raw paintings of human depravity shattered the cool demeanor of the art world and established him as an effective champion of figurative expression, has died. He was 82. Golub died Sunday in New York of complications after undergoing surgery, his son Stephen Golub said. A longtime critic of the abuse of power, the artist sometimes called himself "a machine that turns out monsters."
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BOOKS
May 26, 1985 | George J. Leonard, Leonard is a writer and art critic whose last novel, "The Ice Cathedral" (Simon & Schuster), will soon appear as a Pinnacle paperback. and
Not since the 1960s has a living American painter aroused the enthusiasm that Leon Golub has aroused this year. During the past months, Golub has had major retrospectives in Paris, London and New York. He has been on the covers of two major art journals. He has been the subject of a major story in Time. And the list goes on. Yet just nine years ago, Golub, already in his 50s, savagely destroyed several of his paintings. Rejected for so long, he had begun to lose faith in himself.
NEWS
May 20, 2004
Kudos for making some sense out of the images from Iraq ["The Images of Wars' Horrors," by Christopher Knight, May 13]. Too much political rhetoric has been heaped on, and not enough insight into the all-too-human nature of these abuses. I was glad that you brought up the work of Leon Golub, who next to Goya is probably the greatest artist to treat the inner truths of the "disasters of war." In the end, should anyone have been surprised? Wouldn't it be nice if all the sanctimony were stripped away, and the bare truth of these images could sink in?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1992 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What is most shocking about Leon Golub's installation, "WorldWide," at UC San Diego's Mandeville Gallery, is that it hardly shocks at all. The show consists of 12 large photographic transparencies that hang from the gallery ceiling at various heights and angles. Each features a different fragmented image reproduced from Golub's paintings of torturers, assassins, mercenaries and mourners.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Leon Golub and Nancy Spero are having the time of their lives. The veteran New York artists--partners in marriage, aesthetic dialogues and art-world politics for more than four decades--have logged more time as outsiders than as artists in demand.
NEWS
May 20, 2004
Kudos for making some sense out of the images from Iraq ["The Images of Wars' Horrors," by Christopher Knight, May 13]. Too much political rhetoric has been heaped on, and not enough insight into the all-too-human nature of these abuses. I was glad that you brought up the work of Leon Golub, who next to Goya is probably the greatest artist to treat the inner truths of the "disasters of war." In the end, should anyone have been surprised? Wouldn't it be nice if all the sanctimony were stripped away, and the bare truth of these images could sink in?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
F. Scott Hess' nightmare visions of society teetering on the edge of madness and violence have mellowed a bit. All the usual devices are in place, but they seem less hallucinatory. It's not the lusciously painted ground that's changed. It still heaves like the deck of a sinking ocean liner. Skin tones remain bruised with the muscular swelling of a fresh welt. Yet in these paintings the feeling is less of some impending, awesome violence and more a festering anxiety. The social dynamics Hess investigates this time out include a frontal, pastel image of an accidental shooting by good old boys messing around with guns in the Badlands and a man furtively turning away from a bluff overlooking a peaceful suburb.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Is it in the ordinary everyday or under extreme conditions that human nature most reveals itself? Philosophers and social scientists have taken this question especially seriously during the past century, whose history suggests that civilized culture and genocide both fall within the parameters of the fundamentally human. Leon Golub's art grounds itself in that bitter truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Picture Peace Mobile Museum, a 48-foot semi-trailer transporting a message of peace, will be parked at MacArthur Park today through Saturday. Bearing mostly prints by leading American artists who address the topic--Robert Longo, Judy Chicago, Jonathan Borofsky, Nancy Spero, Leon Golub, Andy Warhol and others--the truck, open from noon to 6 p.m. at the corner of 6th and Park View streets, is on a national tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Is it in the ordinary everyday or under extreme conditions that human nature most reveals itself? Philosophers and social scientists have taken this question especially seriously during the past century, whose history suggests that civilized culture and genocide both fall within the parameters of the fundamentally human. Leon Golub's art grounds itself in that bitter truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Leon Golub and Nancy Spero are having the time of their lives. The veteran New York artists--partners in marriage, aesthetic dialogues and art-world politics for more than four decades--have logged more time as outsiders than as artists in demand.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1992 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What is most shocking about Leon Golub's installation, "WorldWide," at UC San Diego's Mandeville Gallery, is that it hardly shocks at all. The show consists of 12 large photographic transparencies that hang from the gallery ceiling at various heights and angles. Each features a different fragmented image reproduced from Golub's paintings of torturers, assassins, mercenaries and mourners.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
F. Scott Hess' nightmare visions of society teetering on the edge of madness and violence have mellowed a bit. All the usual devices are in place, but they seem less hallucinatory. It's not the lusciously painted ground that's changed. It still heaves like the deck of a sinking ocean liner. Skin tones remain bruised with the muscular swelling of a fresh welt. Yet in these paintings the feeling is less of some impending, awesome violence and more a festering anxiety. The social dynamics Hess investigates this time out include a frontal, pastel image of an accidental shooting by good old boys messing around with guns in the Badlands and a man furtively turning away from a bluff overlooking a peaceful suburb.
BOOKS
May 26, 1985 | George J. Leonard, Leonard is a writer and art critic whose last novel, "The Ice Cathedral" (Simon & Schuster), will soon appear as a Pinnacle paperback. and
Not since the 1960s has a living American painter aroused the enthusiasm that Leon Golub has aroused this year. During the past months, Golub has had major retrospectives in Paris, London and New York. He has been on the covers of two major art journals. He has been the subject of a major story in Time. And the list goes on. Yet just nine years ago, Golub, already in his 50s, savagely destroyed several of his paintings. Rejected for so long, he had begun to lose faith in himself.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | MARGARITA NIETO, Nieto is on the Southern California Advisory Council of the Smithsonian Institution's Archives of American Art
In its most significant aspects, contemporary art is ugly . . . a threat to the ordering of society and man's concept of himself. --Leon Golub Gerald Marzorati first viewed Leon Golub's work in January, 1982, at the Susan Caldwell Gallery in Soho. He was drawn in by a sign on the door: "Please be advised that the current exhibition at Susan Caldwell Inc., may be inappropriate for viewing by children."
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