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Leon Trotsky

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
In “The Assassination of Leon Trotsky,” a world premiere at the Odyssey, Peter Lefcourt, a playwright and Emmy-winning television writer-producer, slips his chain. The play has been subtitled “A Comedy,” but it's clear that Lefcourt intends an out-and-out farce. But in farce, catastrophe gallops through a slammed boudoir door or five, catching its characters hilariously unawares. In “Trotsky,” the characters embrace chaos deliberately and without motivation, a soggy approach that considerably dampens the humor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
In “The Assassination of Leon Trotsky,” a world premiere at the Odyssey, Peter Lefcourt, a playwright and Emmy-winning television writer-producer, slips his chain. The play has been subtitled “A Comedy,” but it's clear that Lefcourt intends an out-and-out farce. But in farce, catastrophe gallops through a slammed boudoir door or five, catching its characters hilariously unawares. In “Trotsky,” the characters embrace chaos deliberately and without motivation, a soggy approach that considerably dampens the humor.
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NEWS
November 2, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All over the world, bad things happened to people close to young Esteban Volkov. Usually they died. His mother committed suicide in Berlin. His father reportedly was shot to death in a Soviet concentration camp. In Paris, an uncle succumbed mysteriously after a routine appendectomy. Later, it was determined that the uncle almost certainly was poisoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As funny as an ax to the head, the Canadian comedy "The Trotsky" rolls through its brash, too-clever take on high school outsiderdom — a 17-year-old Montrealite (Jay Baruchel) who believes he's the reincarnation of Leon Trotsky — with a revolutionary's exasperating confidence. In bespectacled, history-emboldened Leon Bronstein's organizing against his capitalist father (Saul Rubinek), aggressively courting an Alexandra (Emily Hampshire) he claims will be his future wife, and leading the charge against fascism at his school, writer-director Jacob Tierney believes he's found the ultimate nerd antihero: a socialist networker.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As funny as an ax to the head, the Canadian comedy "The Trotsky" rolls through its brash, too-clever take on high school outsiderdom — a 17-year-old Montrealite (Jay Baruchel) who believes he's the reincarnation of Leon Trotsky — with a revolutionary's exasperating confidence. In bespectacled, history-emboldened Leon Bronstein's organizing against his capitalist father (Saul Rubinek), aggressively courting an Alexandra (Emily Hampshire) he claims will be his future wife, and leading the charge against fascism at his school, writer-director Jacob Tierney believes he's found the ultimate nerd antihero: a socialist networker.
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | From Reuters
Writings by Leon Trotsky, reviled for decades as the arch-villain of Soviet history, are to be issued in Moscow next year to mark the centenary of his birth, a government official said Tuesday. Viktoriya Cheremykh of the State Publishing Committee Goskomizdat told Moscow Radio that scholars at the Communist Party's Institute of History are preparing the publication.
NEWS
January 5, 1989
Soviet readers were told that the Kremlin was responsible for the murder almost 49 years ago of Leon Trotsky in his exile in Mexico. Historian N. Vasetsky wrote in the weekly Literary Gazette that Trotsky, who with Lenin forged the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, was assassinated in 1940 in an operation ordered from Moscow and run by a secret police agent. "Stalin could not forget old insults . . .
OPINION
June 26, 1988
For 60 years the name of Leon Trotsky has been anathema in the Soviet Union. Long recognized in the West for his vital role in securing first the triumph and then the survival of the Bolshevik revolution, Trotsky has been treated in his homeland as a virtual non-person, his contributions to the revolution ignored and his writings condemned and banned. Vladimir I. Lenin, in the testament that he dictated shortly before his death, called Trotsky the "most able" among his potential successors.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Leon Trotsky, the revolutionary reviled for more than half a century as a Soviet traitor and enemy of socialism, should be exonerated of criminal charges and his works reprinted, a historian said today. The call for a new look at Trotsky by Yuri N. Afanasyev, rector of the State Institute on Historical Archives, runs counter to a central tenet of Soviet orthodoxy that has stood unchallenged for more than 50 years.
NEWS
September 28, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Two leading Soviet newspapers devoted long articles on Sunday to disgraced Bolshevik revolutionary Leon Trotsky but stressed that speculation about a possible reappraisal of his role was groundless. Both the newspaper Soviet Russia and the trade union daily Trud presented Trotsky as an opportunist who had opposed Vladimir I. Lenin, founder of the Soviet state, on many issues.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All over the world, bad things happened to people close to young Esteban Volkov. Usually they died. His mother committed suicide in Berlin. His father reportedly was shot to death in a Soviet concentration camp. In Paris, an uncle succumbed mysteriously after a routine appendectomy. Later, it was determined that the uncle almost certainly was poisoned.
NEWS
August 18, 1989
An official Soviet magazine published works by Leon Trotsky for the first time since the long-reviled former hero of the 1917 revolution was exiled and, in 1940, assassinated in Mexico, presumably by agents of his archrival, Josef Stalin. Young Communist republished a series of Trotsky's articles called "The New Course," first printed in the party daily Pravda in 1923.
NEWS
June 3, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
C. L. R. James, the Marxist philosopher, cricket scholar and international activist whose elegant yet simplistic style produced literary works ranging from a book on the Haitian revolution to a biography of Herman Melville, has died at his London home. The Associated Press reported Friday that he died Wednesday at age 88 in south London's primarily black Brixton District. He reportedly had a chest infection. In an obituary published Friday, the London newspaper The Independent called him "probably the most versatile and accomplished Afro-American intellectual of the 20th Century."
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | From Reuters
Writings by Leon Trotsky, reviled for decades as the arch-villain of Soviet history, are to be issued in Moscow next year to mark the centenary of his birth, a government official said Tuesday. Viktoriya Cheremykh of the State Publishing Committee Goskomizdat told Moscow Radio that scholars at the Communist Party's Institute of History are preparing the publication.
NEWS
September 10, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in six decades, the key role played by Leon Trotsky in the Russian Revolution and the establishment of the Soviet state was formally acknowledged in the Soviet Union on Friday. A senior Soviet historian, writing in the Communist Party newspaper Pravda, said Trotsky was "not the enemy of the revolution and socialism," as the party has held for 60 years, but rather an enemy of the dictator Josef Stalin. Trotsky warned the country that Stalin would only bring disaster, wrote Col.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | Associated Press
The grandson of Leon Trotsky, in San Francisco to support efforts to clear Trotsky's name, was present at a momentous piece of history--the assassination of his grandfather. Vsevolod (Seva for short) Volkov said that, when 14 years old, he saw the scene on Aug. 29, 1940, in Mexico, through a crack in the dining room floor. That was after an assassin had struck Trotsky with an ice ax, inflicting an inch-deep head wound.
NEWS
June 11, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of personal papers belonging to the seminal Soviet revolutionary Leon Trotsky, including an attack against bitter rival Josef Stalin penned in invisible ink in the margins of a book, have been found by scholars at the Hoover Institution in Palo Alto. The remarkable find, consisting of 35 folders of photographs and more than 70 boxes of letters, speeches, notebooks, reports and other papers, were sold to the Stanford University-affiliated institute in 1963 by a Russian emigre, Boris I.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1988 | ROBERT S. WISTRICH, Robert S. Wistrich is a professor of modern European history at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the author of "Trotsky, Fate of a Revolutionary" (Stein & Day, 1981) and "Hitler's Apocalypse" (Weidenfeld, 1985) and other works
Things are changing fast in the Soviet Union. In the era of glasnost even such former non-persons as Nikolai I. Bukharin, Lev B. Kamenev and Grigory E. Zinoviev, victims of the bloody Moscow show trials of 50 years ago, have been rehabilitated.
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