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Leonard Britton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2009 | Howard Blume
Leonard Britton, superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District for three stormy years, has died at 78. Britton led two of the nation's largest school systems, leaving behind a successful legacy in Miami that he was unable to translate to Los Angeles before he resigned in 1990. In declining health in recent years, Britton died Sunday morning at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, said his wife, Sherrill. During seven years in charge of the Miami-Dade County public schools, Britton developed well-regarded specialty schools, including one for pregnant teens, forged strong relations with the teachers union, developed a cadre of effective administrators and experimented early on with a school-based management concept that achieved widespread acceptance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2009 | Howard Blume
Leonard Britton, superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District for three stormy years, has died at 78. Britton led two of the nation's largest school systems, leaving behind a successful legacy in Miami that he was unable to translate to Los Angeles before he resigned in 1990. In declining health in recent years, Britton died Sunday morning at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, said his wife, Sherrill. During seven years in charge of the Miami-Dade County public schools, Britton developed well-regarded specialty schools, including one for pregnant teens, forged strong relations with the teachers union, developed a cadre of effective administrators and experimented early on with a school-based management concept that achieved widespread acceptance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1989
For those teachers out there looking for a real world example to explain the term "hypocrisy" to their students, Los Angeles School Board members have provided them a perfect one. First, they claim they can't meet the salary demands of the teachers without making substantial cuts. Soon after, however, they're voting the identical raise to all administrators for the next two years ("School Managers to Get Raise Despite Teacher Opposition," Metro, June 20). Even worse, the same administrators (including Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1992
Certainly I am angry at Gov. Wilson and the state Legislature, but I am equally angry at Supt. Bill Anton, his predecessor Leonard Britton, the district's chief financial consultant Robert "New Math" Booker and the members of the Board of Education. I began working for the district in 1983 as a teacher's aide before becoming a teacher the following year. Every year from 1983 to the present the district has claimed to be broke. Every year, with the exception of the last two, they found themselves with hundreds of millions of dollars in surpluses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1990
Your article stated that minority students in Los Angeles Unified School District's voluntary integration busing program, Permits With Transportation (PWT), are doing "little or no better" than students they left behind in segregated schools. The lack of benefits flowing are compounded by many hardships endured, long bus rides, frustration from a sense of not belonging and embitterment from receiving schools. The PWT program has been the "linchpin" to the court-ordered voluntary desegregation requirement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1992
Certainly I am angry at Gov. Wilson and the state Legislature, but I am equally angry at Supt. Bill Anton, his predecessor Leonard Britton, the district's chief financial consultant Robert "New Math" Booker and the members of the Board of Education. I began working for the district in 1983 as a teacher's aide before becoming a teacher the following year. Every year from 1983 to the present the district has claimed to be broke. Every year, with the exception of the last two, they found themselves with hundreds of millions of dollars in surpluses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1987
I find it highly ironic that the same minority groups who complain endlessly about racism are now going after Leonard Britton, the new superintendent of schools, simply because the man happened to be born white! Where are all their anti-racist policies when it comes to white people? Could you imagine the reaction from minority groups if whites created an uproar over a black or Latino appointee? "A white would be more sensitive to the needs of the white community," would be the hypothetical clamor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1989
The Times editorial "Buried Treasure" (Jan. 7) and Jay Mathews' column "A Superior Principal" (Op-Ed Page, Jan. 4), both about former Garfield High School principal Henry Gradillas, prompt me to clear up a number of inaccuracies and innuendoes suggested by the authors which, unless put in perspective, offer readers only a partial view of the issue. I'll preface my comments by indicating that Gradillas has earned and maintains an excellent reputation not only in the community but among his colleagues and administrators at all levels in the Los Angeles Unified School District.
NEWS
May 18, 1989
Wayne Johnson went to bed about 12:30 a.m. Wednesday and dreamed about picket lines. It was a pleasant dream, he said, definitely not a nightmare. Five hours later, the president of United Teachers-Los Angeles was awake in his Westwood condominium and choosing his clothes with an eye for what would look good on television. At 7:15 a.m., he was on a real picket line at the start of the third day of the momentous strike he is leading. "When you realize the enormity of this and the potential impact, it can make you nervous," he said, carrying a sign and walking in a circle with about 30 teachers at Union Avenue Elementary School near MacArthur Park.
REAL ESTATE
September 6, 1987
Regarding Supt. Leonard Britton's letter (Aug. 16): Britton's contention that documentation is available and will support district efforts to work with city planning officers and with the commission on these sites is a self-serving misreading of the facts. In the Grant Elementary School initial study provided to the city Planning Department, the impact assessment borders on fraudulent: "Acquisition of these properties for school expansion will not create any adverse land-use impacts as all of the southern half of the existing block is occupied by the school at the present time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1990
Your article stated that minority students in Los Angeles Unified School District's voluntary integration busing program, Permits With Transportation (PWT), are doing "little or no better" than students they left behind in segregated schools. The lack of benefits flowing are compounded by many hardships endured, long bus rides, frustration from a sense of not belonging and embitterment from receiving schools. The PWT program has been the "linchpin" to the court-ordered voluntary desegregation requirement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1989
For those teachers out there looking for a real world example to explain the term "hypocrisy" to their students, Los Angeles School Board members have provided them a perfect one. First, they claim they can't meet the salary demands of the teachers without making substantial cuts. Soon after, however, they're voting the identical raise to all administrators for the next two years ("School Managers to Get Raise Despite Teacher Opposition," Metro, June 20). Even worse, the same administrators (including Supt.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | VINCE KOWALICK, Times Staff Writer
Seems like the game at Saugus High is never over until the last man has been struck out by Roger Salkeld. At least that was the case Friday. Salkeld, Saugus' ace right-hander-turned-ace-reliever, recorded a very special K with two out and the bases loaded in the seventh inning, hurling three comets past Hesperia's Sean Sers to preserve the Centurions' 2-0 victory in the opening round of the Southern Section 3-A Division baseball playoffs....
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | LARRY GORDON and SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writers
The first formal face-to-face negotiations during the 4-day-old teachers' strike in the Los Angeles Unified School District began Thursday night, with no resolution but both sides said talks would resume today. The negotiations are expected to focus on how much of an infusion of extra state monies can be used to boost pay Both United Teachers-Los Angeles President Wayne Johnson and district Supt. Leonard Britton declined to offer specifics as they left the Bonaventure Hotel downtown about 11 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
May 18, 1989
Wayne Johnson went to bed about 12:30 a.m. Wednesday and dreamed about picket lines. It was a pleasant dream, he said, definitely not a nightmare. Five hours later, the president of United Teachers-Los Angeles was awake in his Westwood condominium and choosing his clothes with an eye for what would look good on television. At 7:15 a.m., he was on a real picket line at the start of the third day of the momentous strike he is leading. "When you realize the enormity of this and the potential impact, it can make you nervous," he said, carrying a sign and walking in a circle with about 30 teachers at Union Avenue Elementary School near MacArthur Park.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Money. Power. Respect. Those are the words that combatants on both sides use over and over to describe what is at stake as the Los Angeles Unified School District and its teachers enter the final hours before a strike set for Monday. After a year of hard bargaining, the two sides remain at an impasse over the size of the salary increase for teachers. On Saturday, hopes of reaching a settlement dimmed when a divided school board said it could not raise its latest offer of a 21.5% pay increase over three years.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | LARRY GORDON and SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writers
The first formal face-to-face negotiations during the 4-day-old teachers' strike in the Los Angeles Unified School District began Thursday night, with no resolution but both sides said talks would resume today. The negotiations are expected to focus on how much of an infusion of extra state monies can be used to boost pay Both United Teachers-Los Angeles President Wayne Johnson and district Supt. Leonard Britton declined to offer specifics as they left the Bonaventure Hotel downtown about 11 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Money. Power. Respect. Those are the words that combatants on both sides use over and over to describe what is at stake as the Los Angeles Unified School District and its teachers enter the final hours before a strike set for Monday. After a year of hard bargaining, the two sides remain at an impasse over the size of the salary increase for teachers. On Saturday, hopes of reaching a settlement dimmed when a divided school board said it could not raise its latest offer of a 21.5% pay increase over three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1989
The Times editorial "Buried Treasure" (Jan. 7) and Jay Mathews' column "A Superior Principal" (Op-Ed Page, Jan. 4), both about former Garfield High School principal Henry Gradillas, prompt me to clear up a number of inaccuracies and innuendoes suggested by the authors which, unless put in perspective, offer readers only a partial view of the issue. I'll preface my comments by indicating that Gradillas has earned and maintains an excellent reputation not only in the community but among his colleagues and administrators at all levels in the Los Angeles Unified School District.
REAL ESTATE
September 6, 1987
Regarding Supt. Leonard Britton's letter (Aug. 16): Britton's contention that documentation is available and will support district efforts to work with city planning officers and with the commission on these sites is a self-serving misreading of the facts. In the Grant Elementary School initial study provided to the city Planning Department, the impact assessment borders on fraudulent: "Acquisition of these properties for school expansion will not create any adverse land-use impacts as all of the southern half of the existing block is occupied by the school at the present time.
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