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Leonard Crofoot

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Unison movement is one of the most deeply satisfying creative strategies in all of dance, connecting performers to something greater than themselves and audiences to impulses underpinning the most ancient and profound societal rituals. The 16th installment of "Spectrum: Dance in L.A.," at the Ivar Theatre on Saturday, provided a coincidental survey of the technical and expressive possibilities of unison, with most of the 14 companies and pieces on view focused on nothing else.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Unison movement is one of the most deeply satisfying creative strategies in all of dance, connecting performers to something greater than themselves and audiences to impulses underpinning the most ancient and profound societal rituals. The 16th installment of "Spectrum: Dance in L.A.," at the Ivar Theatre on Saturday, provided a coincidental survey of the technical and expressive possibilities of unison, with most of the 14 companies and pieces on view focused on nothing else.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2001
* American Cinematheque presents its popular "Third Annual Festival of Film Noir," May 11-27 at the Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. $6-$8. (323) 466-3456. * The Paris Opera Ballet dances Rudolf Nureyev's staging of the full-length "La Bayadere" on Tuesday, Wednesday and May 11-13 in the Orange County Performing Arts Center, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. $20 to $85 (714) 556-ARTS.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Eighty years ago, the great Polish-Ukrainian ballet star Vaslav Nijinsky gave his last public performance, already victimized by the mental illness that would consume him until his death in 1950. No films exist of his dancing, but his legendary blend of technique and sensuality left every male dancer after him in his shadow.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was far more than a trip down memory lane when 32 dancers spoke about their lives in "The Horse's Mouth Greets the New Millennium" Saturday at the Japan America Theatre. Sure, every 90-second anecdote in this "live documentary" created by Tina Croll and James Cunningham revealed an interesting part of the dancers' lives, sometimes hilariously, sometimes touchingly. We got to know, appreciate and embrace them more and in a different way than when they danced later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2004 | By Keith Thursby
George Zoritch, an international ballet star who had a second career as a well-respected teacher, died Nov. 1 at Carondelet St. Mary's Hospital in Tucson. He was 92. His death was confirmed by a spokeswoman for the law firm representing his estate. The cause was not given. Zoritch had retired in 1987 from teaching dance at the University of Arizona. He also taught at his studio in West Hollywood and had several stage and film credits. Zoritch was best known for his work with the Ballet Russe companies starting in the 1930s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1994 | REBECCA BRYANT
Some of these guys were not having a Yabba Dabba Do time. Blue-stubbled faces of wanna-be Freds twisted in concentration. A man trying out for Walter Concrete wiped cold sweat onto his sleeve. Sure, a couple of Barneys yucked it up, but that pesky little fellow never did take anything seriously. But serious it was, this cattle call for "The Flintstones Show" at Universal Studios Tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES
As part of the ongoing Jean Cocteau Centenary Festival, choreographer Tony Clark turned to a problematic art form--the melodrama--for his "Orphee, Oedipus and the Lady With the Red Gloves," seen Friday at the Gallery Theatre in Barnsdall Park. Long associated with musical composition in Germany and France, melodrama is distinguished as a form by the use of an actor who speaks instead of sings. It runs the risk of satisfying neither those interested in dramatic recitation nor those interested in singing--or, in this case, dancing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Life may be a cabaret, but don't try telling that to the Irvine Civic Light Opera these days. The troupe's financial woes have lent an unusual, and uncomfortable, importance to its production of the John Kander/Fred Ebb musical. What the ICLO needs is a hit, the kind of show that generates the word-of-mouth that leads to a full house--and maximum box office--every night. What it's got is something only passable, a mix of entertaining stretches diminished by missed opportunities.
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