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Leonard Foote

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December 20, 1989 | JAY HOVDEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the state's most influential legislators have called for the resignation of Leonard Foote, executive secretary of the California Horse Racing Board, and his senior management staff. In a letter addressed to board Chairman Les Liscom, Sen. Ken Maddy (R-Fresno) and Assemblyman Richard Floyd (D-Carson) expressed their "grave concern" regarding a "progressive deterioration in the functioning on the administration of (the CHRB) such that its very integrity is now in question."
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July 27, 1990 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Hutcheson, assistant executive secretary of the California Horse Racing Board for more than two years, was elected executive secretary at a board meeting Thursday. By a 5-2 vote, racing commissioners named Hutcheson over 41 other candidates for the $74,500-a-year job, which became vacant in April when Len Foote retired after 22 years with the board.
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SPORTS
May 24, 1989 | JAY HOVDEY, Special to The Times
Wayne Lukas, Laz Barrera and two other thoroughbred trainers accused of running horses that allegedly tested positive for cocaine are likely to have those charges dismissed by the California Horse Racing Board. The cases against Lukas, Barrera, Anthony Hemmerick and Bryan Webb have been pending since last February, when Truesdail Laboratories, the board's official lab, revealed their results after retesting frozen urine samples from races as far back as August of 1988. Although the accused trainers vehemently denied the charges from the outset, racing board representatives maintained that the cases against them were strong.
SPORTS
January 28, 1990 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After ducking verbal brickbats from horsemen, state legislators and racing-board members, Len Foote has resigned as secretary of the California Horse Racing Board, about a year before his scheduled retirement. Foote's resignation, which takes effect at the end of March, was announced Friday at a meeting of the racing board in Monrovia. A board member, requesting anonymity, said that Foote decided to resign after a meeting with Henry Chavez, who recently became board chairman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1985 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
California's horse racing industry may soon have a big weapon to fend off expected competition from the state lottery: a "pick nine" wagering system that could offer payoffs as high $5 million on a $1 bet. Under the proposal, put forward by the Santa Anita Race Track, daily pick nine prizes would go to any bettor who correctly chose all nine winners on a nine-race program--a 300-million-to-one chance. If no one picked nine winning horses, 25% of that day's wagers would be awarded to whoever picked the most winners, and the rest of the money would be rolled over to the next racing day. When the pool reached $5 million, the pot would be awarded to the most successful bettor, regardless of the number of winners picked.
SPORTS
January 28, 1990 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After ducking verbal brickbats from horsemen, state legislators and racing-board members, Len Foote has resigned as secretary of the California Horse Racing Board, about a year before his scheduled retirement. Foote's resignation, which takes effect at the end of March, was announced Friday at a meeting of the racing board in Monrovia. A board member, requesting anonymity, said that Foote decided to resign after a meeting with Henry Chavez, who recently became board chairman.
SPORTS
July 27, 1990 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Hutcheson, assistant executive secretary of the California Horse Racing Board for more than two years, was elected executive secretary at a board meeting Thursday. By a 5-2 vote, racing commissioners named Hutcheson over 41 other candidates for the $74,500-a-year job, which became vacant in April when Len Foote retired after 22 years with the board.
SPORTS
October 29, 1985
The California Horse Racing Board has rescheduled a hearing on the interruption of racing at Del Mar in the aftermath of a raid by the Immigration and Naturalization Service two months ago. The matter had been scheduled to come up at the board's regular monthly meeting Wednesday in Arcadia, but the agenda item was continued until Nov. 22.
SPORTS
June 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Accusations against D. Wayne Lukas, Laz Barrera and three other thoroughbred trainers alleging the presence of cocaine in horses they train were dismissed today. Leonard Foote, secretary of the California Horse Racing Board, announced at a news conference at Hollywood Park that the decision had been made by the CHRB on Tuesday. In addition to Barrera and Lukas, accusations were dropped against Barrera's son, Albert; Anthony J. Hemmerick, and Bryan Webb. 'Accusations We Cannot Prove' "We don't want to charge people with accusations we cannot prove," Foote said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1985 | NANCY RAY, Times Staff Writer
The California Horse Racing Board will subpoena Bobby Frankel, former president of the powerful Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Assn. to testify at a hearing next week about his role in the one-day boycott that canceled a Saturday race card in August at the Del Mar Race Track.
SPORTS
December 20, 1989 | JAY HOVDEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the state's most influential legislators have called for the resignation of Leonard Foote, executive secretary of the California Horse Racing Board, and his senior management staff. In a letter addressed to board Chairman Les Liscom, Sen. Ken Maddy (R-Fresno) and Assemblyman Richard Floyd (D-Carson) expressed their "grave concern" regarding a "progressive deterioration in the functioning on the administration of (the CHRB) such that its very integrity is now in question."
SPORTS
May 24, 1989 | JAY HOVDEY, Special to The Times
Wayne Lukas, Laz Barrera and two other thoroughbred trainers accused of running horses that allegedly tested positive for cocaine are likely to have those charges dismissed by the California Horse Racing Board. The cases against Lukas, Barrera, Anthony Hemmerick and Bryan Webb have been pending since last February, when Truesdail Laboratories, the board's official lab, revealed their results after retesting frozen urine samples from races as far back as August of 1988. Although the accused trainers vehemently denied the charges from the outset, racing board representatives maintained that the cases against them were strong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1985 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
California's horse racing industry may soon have a big weapon to fend off expected competition from the state lottery: a "pick nine" wagering system that could offer payoffs as high $5 million on a $1 bet. Under the proposal, put forward by the Santa Anita Race Track, daily pick nine prizes would go to any bettor who correctly chose all nine winners on a nine-race program--a 300-million-to-one chance. If no one picked nine winning horses, 25% of that day's wagers would be awarded to whoever picked the most winners, and the rest of the money would be rolled over to the next racing day. When the pool reached $5 million, the pot would be awarded to the most successful bettor, regardless of the number of winners picked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1985 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
The California Horse Racing Board has launched an investigation of events that led to the cancellation of racing at Del Mar Race Track for one day during last month's standoff between horse trainers and immigration authorities intent on ridding the track of illegal alien workers.
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