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Leonard Jacoby

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BUSINESS
October 18, 1995 | From Reuters
Jacoby & Meyers, which used TV ads to spark a revolution in low-cost storefront law firms, is going to court again. But this time there's a twist--Jacoby is suing Meyers. A suit filed in Superior Court in Los Angeles this month shows Leonard Jacoby is suing longtime partner Stephen Meyers, seeking dissolution of the partnership.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1995 | From Reuters
Jacoby & Meyers, which used TV ads to spark a revolution in low-cost storefront law firms, is going to court again. But this time there's a twist--Jacoby is suing Meyers. A suit filed in Superior Court in Los Angeles this month shows Leonard Jacoby is suing longtime partner Stephen Meyers, seeking dissolution of the partnership.
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BUSINESS
July 12, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taxpayers Against Fraud, a California group that helps employees sue defense firms, has itself been charged with fraud and deceit in a lawsuit filed by whistle-blower Max Killingsworth. The suit marks the first time that plaintiffs have so openly squabbled in a system that allows individuals to sue defense contractors on behalf of the federal government. Under the federal False Claims Act, a whistle-blower can obtain a share in any court awards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1995 | DEBORAH HASTINGS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It had to happen sometime: Jacoby is suing Meyers. They teamed up nearly 20 years ago to hang out a TV shingle that made them the K mart of American law. But that's in jeopardy now. Leonard Jacoby has filed suit against Stephen Meyers, accusing Meyers of trying to squeeze him out. And there's nothing cut-rate about the money Jacoby is asking for. He is demanding $2 million from his law school buddy and 23-year business partner, accusing him of breach of partnership, fraud and emotional distress.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A private spat between two of Orange County's best-known investment advisors turned public this week when Byron Roth, chairman of Newport Beach-based Cruttenden Roth, accused his partner and former boss of stealing clients and employees for a new Internet venture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY and EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Los Angeles criminal defense attorney killed in his office was facing allegations of embezzling money from a former law firm and misappropriating clients' fees, court records showed Tuesday, but investigators said they are unsure if there is any connection between the accusations and the slaying. Nathan Arnold Richardson, 34, was gunned down about 12:15 p.m. Monday in the lobby of his office at 5455 Wilshire Blvd.
NEWS
April 21, 1996 | JEFF BRAZIL and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A traffic accident has claimed the life of Stephen Z. Meyers, co-founder of the legendary Jacoby & Meyers law firm, which brought everyday Americans Kmart-esque legal fees and the first television commercials touting the benefits of cut-rate barristers. Authorities and family friends said Meyers, 53, died Friday after a head-on collision in New Fairfield, Conn., near where he and his wife, Millie Harmon, had a weekend home. A stepdaughter, Brooke Harmon, 27, suffered a broken leg in the crash.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California law designed to take the hype out of attorney advertising went into effect this month, and personal injury lawyer Larry H. Parker sure isn't enjoying it. Gone are Parker's ads showing a healthy-looking man in a Hawaiian shirt sipping a cool drink and proclaiming, "Larry Parker won me $2.1 million, and I'm sure enjoying it." To comply with the law, the Long Beach attorney has been forced to scrap the trademark TV commercials so familiar to daytime viewers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS
Must have been a slow news day. Whatever the reason, the media apparently showed up en masse that day back in September 1972, when a couple of young lawyers hyped the opening of a "revolutionary" law office on Van Nuys Boulevard. This fledging, for-profit "legal clinic" promised cut-rate legal services for the middle class. Leonard D. Jacoby and Stephen Z. Meyers were stunned that so many camera crews and reporters came to their news conference. Then, from the back, they heard a voice.
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