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Leonard Kleinrock

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OPINION
October 24, 2009
The Internet, like victory, has many fathers. One of the best known is Leonard Kleinrock, a computer science professor at UCLA. He was in the campus computer lab 40 years ago, on Wednesday, Oct. 29, 1969. At 10:30 p.m., he and his colleagues were working on a computer the size of an old-fashioned phone booth when they sent the first computer message. It was launched via a packet-switching mathematical theory Kleinrock had conceived for transmitting data. The message traveled from UCLA to the Stanford Research Institute on a system set up through a Defense Department program.
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NEWS
October 24, 2009 | PATT MORRISON
The Internet, like victory, has many fathers. One of the best known is Leonard Kleinrock, a computer science professor at UCLA. He was in the campus computer lab 40 years ago, on Wednesday, Oct. 29, 1969. At 10:30 p.m., he and his colleagues were working on a computer the size of an old-fashioned phone booth when they sent the first computer message. It was launched via a packet-switching mathematical theory Kleinrock had conceived for transmitting data. The message traveled from UCLA to the Stanford Research Institute on a system set up through a Defense Department program.
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NEWS
October 24, 2009 | PATT MORRISON
The Internet, like victory, has many fathers. One of the best known is Leonard Kleinrock, a computer science professor at UCLA. He was in the campus computer lab 40 years ago, on Wednesday, Oct. 29, 1969. At 10:30 p.m., he and his colleagues were working on a computer the size of an old-fashioned phone booth when they sent the first computer message. It was launched via a packet-switching mathematical theory Kleinrock had conceived for transmitting data. The message traveled from UCLA to the Stanford Research Institute on a system set up through a Defense Department program.
OPINION
October 24, 2009
The Internet, like victory, has many fathers. One of the best known is Leonard Kleinrock, a computer science professor at UCLA. He was in the campus computer lab 40 years ago, on Wednesday, Oct. 29, 1969. At 10:30 p.m., he and his colleagues were working on a computer the size of an old-fashioned phone booth when they sent the first computer message. It was launched via a packet-switching mathematical theory Kleinrock had conceived for transmitting data. The message traveled from UCLA to the Stanford Research Institute on a system set up through a Defense Department program.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
Since it's so fashionable these days to question whether government can do anything right -- whether it's regulating banks, bolstering the economy or overseeing healthcare -- it's worth noting that we're about to celebrate the 40th anniversary of one of the most important federal initiatives of our time. The event was the launch of the Internet, which we date from Oct. 29, 1969, when a refrigerator-sized special-purpose computer in Leonard Kleinrock's engineering lab at UCLA transmitted its first message to a twin machine in Menlo Park, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was there at the start--the day the very first message landed on the information highway. It was Nov. 21, 1969, and Leonard Kleinrock made one last check of the system that he had come up with to let computers talk to each other over telephone lines instead of waiting for magnetic tapes or punch cards to be exchanged by mail. The equipment was stuffed inside a refrigerator-size cabinet in the middle of Room 3420 at UCLA's Boelter Hall.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No single person is responsible for creating the Internet, whose tentacles now embrace an estimated 200 million worldwide. Likewise, there is no consensus about a single event that marked its birth. Instead, the Internet owes its existence to dozens of engineers who spent years pushing the boundaries of computer science until it revolutionized personal and business communications by removing some of the traditional barriers of time and space.
NEWS
July 3, 1986
The $35,000 Marconi International Fellowship will be awarded to Leonard Kleinrock, a professor of computer science at UCLA, in ceremonies today in Brussels. The award, which university officials consider to be the most prestigious prize in the field of communications, will be presented by Crown Prince Albert, brother of King Baudouin of Belgium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2008 | Jean Merl
Two scholars from local universities are among eight recipients of the National Medal of Science, the nation's highest honor for science and technology. Leonard Kleinrock of UCLA and Andrew J. Viterbi of USC were among the 2007 laureates announced Monday by President Bush in Washington. The National Medal of Science honors individuals for pioneering research in such fields as physical, biological, mathematical, social, behavioral and engineering sciences. The National Science Foundation administers the award, which was established by Congress in 1959.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
Internet Anniversary: Today is the 30th anniversary of the first transmission on what was to become the Internet, and UCLA will mark the occasion with a symposium about the global computer network. Panelists will discuss the Internet's impact on business, the economy, education and the evolution of a global community.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
Since it's so fashionable these days to question whether government can do anything right -- whether it's regulating banks, bolstering the economy or overseeing healthcare -- it's worth noting that we're about to celebrate the 40th anniversary of one of the most important federal initiatives of our time. The event was the launch of the Internet, which we date from Oct. 29, 1969, when a refrigerator-sized special-purpose computer in Leonard Kleinrock's engineering lab at UCLA transmitted its first message to a twin machine in Menlo Park, Calif.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No single person is responsible for creating the Internet, whose tentacles now embrace an estimated 200 million worldwide. Likewise, there is no consensus about a single event that marked its birth. Instead, the Internet owes its existence to dozens of engineers who spent years pushing the boundaries of computer science until it revolutionized personal and business communications by removing some of the traditional barriers of time and space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was there at the start--the day the very first message landed on the information highway. It was Nov. 21, 1969, and Leonard Kleinrock made one last check of the system that he had come up with to let computers talk to each other over telephone lines instead of waiting for magnetic tapes or punch cards to be exchanged by mail. The equipment was stuffed inside a refrigerator-size cabinet in the middle of Room 3420 at UCLA's Boelter Hall.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
Out of the Dark: Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan is an appropriate speaker for Wednesday's first Greater Southern California Government and Business Tech Expo at the Los Angeles Convention Center. A study he commissioned earlier this year found that the city government's antiquated technology is costing Los Angeles millions of dollars annually and jeopardizing public safety.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
Does the Internet live in Virginia? The answer, according to the Economic Development Authority of Fairfax County, Va., is yes. The agency touts Fairfax County as "Home of the Internet" on its Web site (http://www.fairfaxcountyeda.org) and in radio promotions on National Public Radio.
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