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Leonard Kranser

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000
As a resident of Newport Beach, living for three decades directly under the John Wayne flight path, I read Leonard Kranser's letter (Oct. 15) with considerable interest. As one of the chief spokesmen for the hysterical campaign against a commercial airport at El Toro, Kranser has given new vividness and potency to the word "duplicity." During the campaign to establish El Toro as a commercial venture, we in Newport Beach were given the pious promise that, of course, South County voters would never consent to see the flight caps expanded or eliminated at John Wayne.
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OPINION
May 15, 2004
Orange County Supervisor Charles V. Smith recommends selling John Wayne Airport to raise money to pay off the county's bankruptcy debt (May 8). One possible buyer would be Los Angeles World Airports. Last year, Smith actively supported L.A.'s unsuccessful attempt to take over El Toro and run it as a satellite of LAX. Who would win and lose from the transfer of John Wayne? Clearly, L.A.'s political leaders and LAX neighbors might hope to gain. Their goal is to limit the use of LAX. Orange County groups advocating more local aviation capacity might get their wish, since L.A. would be unlikely to continue the flight restrictions at John Wayne when they expire.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
Re The Times report on John Wayne Airport ("Still Circling, 10 Years After Takeoff," Sept. 17): Airport-demand exaggerations grow and grow like Pinocchio's nose. First of all, industry practice is to count everyone twice, once when they get on the plane and once when they get off. More important, estimates of "Orange County passengers" are not limited to those of us who live and work here. A study conducted by Los Angeles International Airport showed that the largest segment--40% of county travelers using LAX--was visitors headed in and out of Anaheim/Disneyland.
NEWS
May 4, 2003
Re "Pollution at El Toro Said Not a Threat," April 26: That is good news for those who have been hoping for the end of the El Toro fight. Sale of the land for homes, business and a Great Park and educational center for Orange County will begin this year. But the article gives too much weight to the contrary opinion of lawyer Greg Hurley, characterizing him as an environmental watchdog and failing to fully identify his role. Hurley, and his law firm, work for the Airport Working Group.
OPINION
October 6, 2002
Re "Davis' 1-2 Punch Helps O.C.," Sept. 29: The Times editorializes, "Let's hope that remaining holdouts get the message that the war over El Toro is over." This message is particularly true for the cities of North County that joined the Orange County Regional Airport Authority. Prodded by Newport Beach, which has legitimate concerns about John Wayne Airport in its backyard, other city councils put their time, money and effort into the failed fight for El Toro. They sued the county to try to overturn Measure W by litigation and lost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001
Re "FAA Builds a Stone Wall Around El Toro," (Orange County Voices, Jan. 21): NIMBYs continue to repeat the Big Lie, over and over again. In this case, it is Leonard Kranser, telling us El Toro airport "is unsafe, unneeded and unwanted." The safety of El Toro airport is not the purview of Kranser or any other highly biased South County NIMBY. Rather it is a decision for the Federal Aviation Administration. How is it that these NIMBYs who are so against air traffic in Orange County (sporting "NO JETS AT EL TORO" bumper stickers)
NEWS
May 4, 2003
Re "Pollution at El Toro Said Not a Threat," April 26: That is good news for those who have been hoping for the end of the El Toro fight. Sale of the land for homes, business and a Great Park and educational center for Orange County will begin this year. But the article gives too much weight to the contrary opinion of lawyer Greg Hurley, characterizing him as an environmental watchdog and failing to fully identify his role. Hurley, and his law firm, work for the Airport Working Group.
OPINION
May 15, 2004
Orange County Supervisor Charles V. Smith recommends selling John Wayne Airport to raise money to pay off the county's bankruptcy debt (May 8). One possible buyer would be Los Angeles World Airports. Last year, Smith actively supported L.A.'s unsuccessful attempt to take over El Toro and run it as a satellite of LAX. Who would win and lose from the transfer of John Wayne? Clearly, L.A.'s political leaders and LAX neighbors might hope to gain. Their goal is to limit the use of LAX. Orange County groups advocating more local aviation capacity might get their wish, since L.A. would be unlikely to continue the flight restrictions at John Wayne when they expire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997
The Capistrano Unified School District trustees voted unanimously on June 9 to oppose construction of a commercial airport at El Toro. In their deliberations, they focused on well-established facts concerning the negative impacts of aircraft noise and pollution on children. The El Toro Airport Info Site, an all-volunteer World Wide Web site team, based in Dana Point, Aliso Viejo and Irvine, gathered some of the studies considered by the board. One of the most compelling pieces of research is a 1995 study of children living near Munich International Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000
The Board of Supervisors should take a lesson in political etiquette from the Burbank City Council. The Burbank Airport expansion issue has been kicked around for years and the council finally put it on the recent ballot and it passed big time. Passage of the measure does not signal support for or opposition to expansion, but only the right of residents to ultimately decide the issue. Any agreement between the city and the Airport Authority to relocate or expand the airport terminal now requires Burbank voter approval.
OPINION
October 6, 2002
Re "Davis' 1-2 Punch Helps O.C.," Sept. 29: The Times editorializes, "Let's hope that remaining holdouts get the message that the war over El Toro is over." This message is particularly true for the cities of North County that joined the Orange County Regional Airport Authority. Prodded by Newport Beach, which has legitimate concerns about John Wayne Airport in its backyard, other city councils put their time, money and effort into the failed fight for El Toro. They sued the county to try to overturn Measure W by litigation and lost.
NEWS
January 27, 2002
Re "Report on El Toro's Toxic Soil Debated," Jan. 17: Backers of an airport at El Toro--struggling to salvage their unpopular project--have turned pollution into a political issue. Because there are pockets of hazardous material in the soil at El Toro, they propose that we make matters worse and build an airport. If the land is dirty, they would leave it dirty--and add airport pollution on top of what already exists. The worst risk that we face at El Toro will come from poisoned air if we allow an airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2001
El Toro airport promoters argue that every county should build its own airport. But what is so special about counties? Why should arbitrary political boundaries on a map determine where airports are located? My birthplace, New York City, has roughly the same population as greater Los Angeles and consists of five counties. Only two of these counties house commercial airports within their boundaries. Millions of New Yorkers use Newark Airport, across the state line in New Jersey. The New York Daily News recently reported on improved train service coming to Newark, JFK and LaGuardia airports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001
The residents of Huntington Beach are angry that 20-hour-a-day construction on a power plant may disturb their sleep even though this project would be good for the state, as we are in desperate need of more power-generating facilities. The residents of Newport Beach are concerned that the lifting of restrictions at John Wayne Airport will mean that their sleep will be disrupted by 24-hour-a-day flights even though they are convinced that the county is in need of more flights to maintain economic growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001
Re "FAA Builds a Stone Wall Around El Toro," (Orange County Voices, Jan. 21): NIMBYs continue to repeat the Big Lie, over and over again. In this case, it is Leonard Kranser, telling us El Toro airport "is unsafe, unneeded and unwanted." The safety of El Toro airport is not the purview of Kranser or any other highly biased South County NIMBY. Rather it is a decision for the Federal Aviation Administration. How is it that these NIMBYs who are so against air traffic in Orange County (sporting "NO JETS AT EL TORO" bumper stickers)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000
The Board of Supervisors should take a lesson in political etiquette from the Burbank City Council. The Burbank Airport expansion issue has been kicked around for years and the council finally put it on the recent ballot and it passed big time. Passage of the measure does not signal support for or opposition to expansion, but only the right of residents to ultimately decide the issue. Any agreement between the city and the Airport Authority to relocate or expand the airport terminal now requires Burbank voter approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998
In April, before county planners unveiled their "Gateway to the 21st Century" airport plan for El Toro, they had ample time to examine the competing non-aviation Millennium Plan. So why did $4 million of planning for an International Trade Center, Global Village and Hillside Research Center suddenly get scrapped, just months after Supervisors Silva, Smith and Steiner voted to adopt the plan? What had changed? What changed wasn't the traffic projections that had been known all along.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1999
The Times seems to have difficulty coming up with a good, short headline reference for the Safe and Healthy Communities Initiative. The Times' March 11 descriptor, "supermajority," never appears in the initiative, and that is not what it is about. The initiative does call for a two-thirds vote of the people for approval of new or expanded large jails in residential areas, new or expanded airports, or toxic landfills. However, it also says that the people would adopt the initiative, with or without the two-thirds ratification vote, if a court ever rules against that provision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000
As a resident of Newport Beach, living for three decades directly under the John Wayne flight path, I read Leonard Kranser's letter (Oct. 15) with considerable interest. As one of the chief spokesmen for the hysterical campaign against a commercial airport at El Toro, Kranser has given new vividness and potency to the word "duplicity." During the campaign to establish El Toro as a commercial venture, we in Newport Beach were given the pious promise that, of course, South County voters would never consent to see the flight caps expanded or eliminated at John Wayne.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000
The headline, "John Wayne's Noise Curfew Faces Threat" (Oct. 7) repeats a scare tactic used by El Toro proponents to rally support for their plans. With most of Southern California's future population growth occurring in inland regions, there is no need for a massive increase in airport capacity in Orange County. Certainly, there is absolutely no need to remove John Wayne Airport's nighttime curfews. San Diego's Lindbergh Field, just like John Wayne, sits on 500 acres and has only one jet runway.
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