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Leonard M Adleman

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SCIENCE
June 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Caltech researchers have produced the most sophisticated DNA-based computer yet, a wet chemistry system that can calculate the square roots of numbers as high as 15. The system is composed of 74 strands of DNA that make up 12 logic gates comparable to those in a silicon-based computer, the researchers reported Thursday in the journal Science. But the system operates a little more slowly than a conventional computer: It takes as much as 10 hours to obtain each result. The new findings mark a major change in the direction of DNA-based computing, which researchers have been working on for two decades.
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SCIENCE
June 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Caltech researchers have produced the most sophisticated DNA-based computer yet, a wet chemistry system that can calculate the square roots of numbers as high as 15. The system is composed of 74 strands of DNA that make up 12 logic gates comparable to those in a silicon-based computer, the researchers reported Thursday in the journal Science. But the system operates a little more slowly than a conventional computer: It takes as much as 10 hours to obtain each result. The new findings mark a major change in the direction of DNA-based computing, which researchers have been working on for two decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1995 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
There may be no better way to illustrate the unconventional intellect of USC mathematician Leonard Adleman than to reflect on how he finessed a failing grade in physics. Today, Adleman, 48, is a distinguished scientist who recently galvanized the world research community by demonstrating that the language of life--the DNA molecules inside every living cell--can be programmed to compute complex problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
There may be no better way to illustrate the unconventional intellect of USC mathematician Leonard Adleman than to reflect on how he finessed a failing grade in physics. Today, Adleman, 48, is a distinguished scientist who recently galvanized the world research community by demonstrating that the language of life--the DNA molecules inside every living cell--can be programmed to compute complex problems.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers have found a way to use the language of life itself--the spiral string of DNA curled inside every living cell--to solve a difficult math problem, suggesting that one day a working computer could be crafted in a test tube. USC computer expert Leonard M. Adleman used the genetic code to program an elementary equation into a unique DNA molecule.
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