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Leonard M Britton

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BUSINESS
January 15, 1989
In his letter published Jan. 1 in The Times, ("Blaming the Los Angeles School Board for the Labor Woes of Teachers is Unfair") Leonard M. Britton, superintendent of schools for Los Angeles, portrays Los Angeles teachers' salaries as comparing favorably to those of teachers in Dade County, Fla., where he previously was superintendent. Unfortunately, he neglected to mention the much greater cost of living in Los Angeles. Houses, for example, are much more expensive in Los Angeles. Perhaps Britton hasn't come face to face with this economic dilemma as his $141,000 salary quite likely has shielded him from it. DONALD ZOELLNER Manhattan Beach The writer is a former Los Angeles teacher.
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MAGAZINE
April 9, 1995
At last I have found a heroine ("Jackie Goldberg and Her Lesson Plan for L.A. Politics," by James Rainey, March 5). As an educator, a parent of two disabled adult children, an advocate for disabled rights, and a lonely liberal living in Orange County, I had lost all hope that a humanitarian could ever be elected to public office and survive. The people of Orange County are sinking in a mire of financial, moral and ethical bankruptcy. About to be especially harmed are the elderly, disabled and blind residents, whose in-home care is being threatened by the takeover of a large for-profit corporation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1987
William J. Johnston, past superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, put forth in The Times (Opinion, May 24) some of the most bizarre ideas and rationalizations as to why Leonard M. Britton was the correct choice to succeed Harry Handler as superintendent of the district. According to Johnston, "Board members were faced with the dilemma of picking a deputy superintendent representing one ethnic group and thus probably alienating another." Let's set the record straight.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | SANDY BANKS and JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
A tough but gregarious insider who grew up on the city's Eastside, new Los Angeles schools chief William R. Anton was widely described Tuesday as a man who may be short of innovative ideas but is long on the kind of optimism and leadership needed to rescue the troubled district. Anton was selected Monday after a grueling, all-day closed meeting among school board members.
NEWS
May 9, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Leonard M. Britton, 56, Dade County, Fla., superintendent of schools, was selected Friday to head the Los Angeles Unified School District, marking the first time in nearly 40 years that an outsider has been chosen for the post, a school district spokesman said. School board members, who had been meeting in closed-door sessions all week to make their choice from among the three finalists, settled on Britton late Friday afternoon.
MAGAZINE
April 9, 1995
At last I have found a heroine ("Jackie Goldberg and Her Lesson Plan for L.A. Politics," by James Rainey, March 5). As an educator, a parent of two disabled adult children, an advocate for disabled rights, and a lonely liberal living in Orange County, I had lost all hope that a humanitarian could ever be elected to public office and survive. The people of Orange County are sinking in a mire of financial, moral and ethical bankruptcy. About to be especially harmed are the elderly, disabled and blind residents, whose in-home care is being threatened by the takeover of a large for-profit corporation.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
It was a historic moment on that spring day in 1964 when Detroit teachers' union President Mary Ellen Riordon climaxed an emotional speech at a teachers' rally with this warning: "We will hit the bricks and walk picket lines until the snow flies if the school board doesn't sign a contract with us." As the hall reverberated with cheers from most of the teachers, a white-haired, hard-of-hearing, matronly lady in a long dress leaned over to a reporter to ask, "What did she say?"
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY and GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writers
As Leonard M. Britton sees it, the three biggest challenges facing him as the Los Angeles Unified School District's new superintendent are increasing students' achievement scores, improving relations with the teachers' union and easing severe classroom overcrowding. But one of Britton's first tasks could be soothing some minority groups who were outraged that the board on Friday selected Britton, who is an Anglo, over the Latino and black finalists from within the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990 | JEAN MERL and SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Leonard Britton, superintendent of the beleaguered Los Angeles Unified School District, stunned district officials on Thursday by announcing he will leave when his contract expires next June. His written statement that he "would like to consider other professional opportunities" means the district must search for a new superintendent at a particularly difficult time.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | SANDY BANKS and JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
A tough but gregarious insider who grew up on the city's Eastside, new Los Angeles schools chief William R. Anton was widely described Tuesday as a man who may be short of innovative ideas but is long on the kind of optimism and leadership needed to rescue the troubled district. Anton was selected Monday after a grueling, all-day closed meeting among school board members.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
William R. Anton, a 38-year veteran of the Los Angeles Unified School District, on Monday was named superintendent, succeeding the man who beat him to the top job just three years ago. The Board of Education voted 6 to 1 to make Anton the first Latino to head the 610,000-student district. The former deputy superintendent will earn the same salary--$164,555--as Leonard Britton, who announced last week he would leave when his contract expired in June, 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1990
I responded strongly to the article on ageism in Hollywood, because when I worked in the business I immediately missed the men and women of graying temples to show me the way. I mentioned this to Coleman Luck, producer of television's "The Equalizer," and he told me there was absolutely no mentoring in this business. "Leadership" and "long-term goals" are terms I've never heard outside of associations and blathering awards ceremonies. In the business, I have met many 45-year-old men who act like children and women who scramble for power and tell a lot of lies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990 | JEAN MERL and SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Leonard Britton, superintendent of the beleaguered Los Angeles Unified School District, stunned district officials on Thursday by announcing he will leave when his contract expires next June. His written statement that he "would like to consider other professional opportunities" means the district must search for a new superintendent at a particularly difficult time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
All schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District will operate on a year-round basis by next year if the school board approves the overcrowding relief plan presented Monday by Supt. Leonard Britton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1989
The president of the Los Angeles teachers' union on Tuesday criticized the decision to renew the contract of Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. Leonard Britton. "The superintendent has done at best a mediocre job," said United Teachers-Los Angeles chief Wayne Johnson. "I feel that he made the strike and all of the problems last year much worse than they would have been under a competent superintendent."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
The Los Angeles Board of Education on Monday voted unanimously to extend for one year the contract of Supt. Leonard Britton, who was the target of heated teachers union attacks during a year dominated by labor strife and board disagreements. The board took the action to extend Britton's contract until June 30, 1991, during a lengthy closed-door meeting. His current three-year contract expires in 1990. "I appreciate the confidence of the board," Britton said after the announcement late Monday.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
William R. Anton, a 38-year veteran of the Los Angeles Unified School District, on Monday was named superintendent, succeeding the man who beat him to the top job just three years ago. The Board of Education voted 6 to 1 to make Anton the first Latino to head the 610,000-student district. The former deputy superintendent will earn the same salary--$164,555--as Leonard Britton, who announced last week he would leave when his contract expired in June, 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
All schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District will operate on a year-round basis by next year if the school board approves the overcrowding relief plan presented Monday by Supt. Leonard Britton.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | LARRY GORDON and SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writers
With a strike deadline only a day away, union teachers and the Los Angeles Unified School District remained deadlocked Saturday on the issue of pay increases and leaders of both sides said a strike now appears likely. Wayne Johnson, president of United Teachers-Los Angeles, said the chances of a strike on Monday now are "99.9%" and that "it would take a minor miracle" to avert one. School board President Roberta Weintraub said, "I am going to assume that on Monday morning a strike will occur."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
The Los Angeles Unified School District and the local teachers' union hurled new threats Monday, pushing the nation's second-largest school system a step closer to its first strike in 19 years. District Supt. Leonard Britton on Monday ordered teachers to turn in final grade information early--no later than next Monday, two weeks before a threatened teachers' strike--or else risk having the district withhold their May paychecks. The head of United Teachers-Los Angeles reacted swiftly to the district's ultimatum, warning that the union will strike Monday instead of May 30. Starting today, the union will urge members to cease all duties aside from teaching.
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