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Leonard Makowka

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Courted for months by a cross-town hospital, Dr. Leonard Makowka, who transplanted the first pig's liver into a human, finally said yes and announced Tuesday that he is leaving Cedars-Sinai Medical Center to establish a transplant program at St. Vincent Medical Center near Downtown Los Angeles. In the end, Makowka said he was induced to leave not so much by the money and other incentives offered by St.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Courted for months by a cross-town hospital, Dr. Leonard Makowka, who transplanted the first pig's liver into a human, finally said yes and announced Tuesday that he is leaving Cedars-Sinai Medical Center to establish a transplant program at St. Vincent Medical Center near Downtown Los Angeles. In the end, Makowka said he was induced to leave not so much by the money and other incentives offered by St.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the turbulent aftermath of the world's first pig-to-human liver transplant, the surgeon, Dr. Leonard Makowka, is embroiled in a dispute with a San Diego biotechnology company that claims him as a vice president, along with exclusive rights to market any innovations emerging from Makowka's pig liver research at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Xenogenex Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the turbulent aftermath of the world's first pig-to-human liver transplant, the surgeon, Dr. Leonard Makowka, is embroiled in a dispute with a San Diego biotechnology company that claims him as a vice president, along with exclusive rights to market any innovations emerging from Makowka's pig liver research at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Xenogenex Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center on Tuesday were already considering doing more pig-to-human liver transplants even as bioethicists rekindled the longstanding debate about how far scientific research should be pushed in humans. The reactions came in the wake of the death Monday of Susan Fowler, 26, of Burbank, about 30 hours after she received a pig's liver to take over the functions of her own failing organ.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1995 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Larry Hagman was in critical condition Wednesday after receiving a liver transplant, but his surgeon gave the former "Dallas" star a good prognosis. After performing 15 hours of surgery, Dr. Leonard Makowka said that he discovered Hagman's cirrhosis was more advanced than thought, but that a cancerous tumor threatening his liver was halted by a special procedure in which doctors stopped blood flow to the area.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
Early in 1990, at Hospital Italiano in Buenos Aires, a child will receive a vital organ in the first transplant operation under auspices of the World Children's Transplant Fund. It will be the realization of a dream for Los Angeles Deputy Police Chief Mark A. Kroeker, a 45-year-old missionaries' son who founded the fund to make life-saving organ transplants available to children from throughout the world, regardless of ability to pay. Kroeker's odyssey, which was told in View on Jan.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2004 | From Reuters
A Beverly Hills company unveiled a device last week based on NASA technology that it said could better detect trace amounts of anthrax. Universal Detection Technology said the device, called the Anthrax Smoke Detector, was ready to be sold commercially and would be tested in September for use in government facilities such as post offices.
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A 62-year-old Pittsburgh man who received a baboon liver in a Sunday evening operation was groggy but in good condition Monday, his surgeons said. The unidentified man, who before the 13-hour operation had only an estimated 30 days to live because of a fatal liver disease, is the second human to receive a baboon liver. He could not be given a human liver because of an active hepatitis B infection, which would infect and destroy a transplanted human liver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center on Tuesday were already considering doing more pig-to-human liver transplants even as bioethicists rekindled the longstanding debate about how far scientific research should be pushed in humans. The reactions came in the wake of the death Monday of Susan Fowler, 26, of Burbank, about 30 hours after she received a pig's liver to take over the functions of her own failing organ.
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Burbank woman who was kept alive with a transplanted pig's liver in an unprecedented procedure died Monday night before she could go into surgery to receive a human liver, a spokesman for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center said. The pig's liver kept Susan Fowler, 26, alive for more than 30 hours until a donated human liver became available Monday, hospital officials said. But the surgery to transplant the human liver never got under way, said hospital spokesman Ronald Wise.
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