Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLeonard Shoen
IN THE NEWS

Leonard Shoen

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonard S. Shoen, the seminal founder of the do-it-yourself moving industry with his creation of U-Haul International Inc. in 1945, apparently has committed suicide. He was 83. Shoen drove his car into a wooden utility pole in Las Vegas shortly before noon Wednesday. The Clark County, Nev., coroner's office said Tuesday that the multimillionaire died of blunt force trauma and that his death was a suicide.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonard S. Shoen, the seminal founder of the do-it-yourself moving industry with his creation of U-Haul International Inc. in 1945, apparently has committed suicide. He was 83. Shoen drove his car into a wooden utility pole in Las Vegas shortly before noon Wednesday. The Clark County, Nev., coroner's office said Tuesday that the multimillionaire died of blunt force trauma and that his death was a suicide.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 22, 1989 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
Leonard Shoen, founder of the U-Haul truck-and-trailer-leasing empire, said he realized just how bitter his family's feud had become when he saw his sons taunt, grab and finally punch each other recently at the company's annual meeting. After reflecting on the rancorous meeting, Shoen said, he has abandoned a proposal under which all 12 of his children would serve on the company's board of directors instead of just four of his sons.
MAGAZINE
February 17, 1991 | ALAN PRENDERGAST, Alan Prendergast, a Denver-based free-lancer, wrote "The Poison Tree" (Avon)
'EXCUSE ME. My mom--I woke up, she's dead on the staircase." The dispatcher at the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office wasn't sure she'd heard it right. The voice on the line was that of a little girl, whimpering something about her mother. "She's sick?" "She's dead on the staircase! There's blood, OK?" "What is your name?" "Bente Shoen. I live in the Ski Ranches--in a big log house. There was blood on the bed. Please send somebody." "OK. You said she's not alive now?"
MAGAZINE
February 17, 1991 | ALAN PRENDERGAST, Alan Prendergast, a Denver-based free-lancer, wrote "The Poison Tree" (Avon)
'EXCUSE ME. My mom--I woke up, she's dead on the staircase." The dispatcher at the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office wasn't sure she'd heard it right. The voice on the line was that of a little girl, whimpering something about her mother. "She's sick?" "She's dead on the staircase! There's blood, OK?" "What is your name?" "Bente Shoen. I live in the Ski Ranches--in a big log house. There was blood on the bed. Please send somebody." "OK. You said she's not alive now?"
BUSINESS
September 4, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early hours of Aug. 6, Eva Berg Shoen, 44, was shot to death with a .25-caliber pistol as she slept in her deluxe log home, set amid aspen and spruce trees outside the rustic, 1880s-vintage ski town of Telluride. Investigators were stumped. The shooting smacked of a professional hit. But why, nervous townspeople wondered, would anyone kill this pleasant, blonde, Norwegian-born woman who had moved with her family to the area for its small-town atmosphere?
BUSINESS
January 25, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Dissidents within Amerco Inc., the holding company which operates the U-Haul rental network, have negotiated the proposed sale of the company to an unidentified buyer for about $1 billion, the founder has confirmed. Leonard S. Shoen, 71, who organized U-Haul in 1945 in a Seattle suburb and moved the headquarters here in 1968, declined to identify the buyer and said he was speaking up because he feels that current management has undervalued stock in soliciting for more shares.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge OKs Settlement in U-Haul Case: Federal Bankruptcy Judge James M. Marlar approved a plan by the board of Amerco Inc., corporate parent of U-Haul International Inc. of Phoenix, to pay the remaining $313.8 million owed on a judgment in favor of U-Haul founder Leonard S. Shoen and six of his children. The judge's decision settles a family feud that began in 1986 when Joe and Mark Shoen forced their father, now 79, into early retirement and began a push to control the company.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1986 | VICTORIA McCARGAR
Leonard S. (Sam) Shoen, 70, founder of the U-Haul rental system and the man generally credited with creating the do-it-yourself moving industry, announced that he will retire from the company he launched more than 40 years ago. "We all reach the point where one phase of your life is complete and you need to go on with the next phase," Shoen said. "I am now going on with the rest of my life."
BUSINESS
September 4, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early hours of Aug. 6, Eva Berg Shoen, 44, was shot to death with a .25-caliber pistol as she slept in her deluxe log home, set amid aspen and spruce trees outside the rustic, 1880s-vintage ski town of Telluride. Investigators were stumped. The shooting smacked of a professional hit. But why, nervous townspeople wondered, would anyone kill this pleasant, blonde, Norwegian-born woman who had moved with her family to the area for its small-town atmosphere?
BUSINESS
March 22, 1989 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
Leonard Shoen, founder of the U-Haul truck-and-trailer-leasing empire, said he realized just how bitter his family's feud had become when he saw his sons taunt, grab and finally punch each other recently at the company's annual meeting. After reflecting on the rancorous meeting, Shoen said, he has abandoned a proposal under which all 12 of his children would serve on the company's board of directors instead of just four of his sons.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|