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Leonardo Boff

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May 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Vatican has forced Brazil's most prominent "liberation theologist" to step down as editor of a liberal Roman Catholic publication, his associates said. Father Leonardo Boff also was pressured by the Vatican to stop teaching theology at an institute in Petropolis, a mountain town near Rio de Janeiro, and to refrain from calls for greater democracy in the church, said Boff's brother, Waldimar, who is also a Franciscan friar.
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WORLD
July 23, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
RIO DE JANEIRO -- By all accounts, Pope Francis has already won over many hearts in Brazil with his simplicity and message of caring for the poor. But as he travels the country on his first overseas trip as pontiff, he will be speaking to a group of young Catholics who hold far more liberal views than the church hierarchy on a number of issues, including female priests,  homosexuality and abortion. After arriving in Rio to enormous crowds on Monday, the pope spent Tuesday resting and having private meetings at the Sumare residence where Pope John Paul stayed in 1980 and 1997.
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WORLD
July 23, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
RIO DE JANEIRO -- By all accounts, Pope Francis has already won over many hearts in Brazil with his simplicity and message of caring for the poor. But as he travels the country on his first overseas trip as pontiff, he will be speaking to a group of young Catholics who hold far more liberal views than the church hierarchy on a number of issues, including female priests,  homosexuality and abortion. After arriving in Rio to enormous crowds on Monday, the pope spent Tuesday resting and having private meetings at the Sumare residence where Pope John Paul stayed in 1980 and 1997.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Vatican has forced Brazil's most prominent "liberation theologist" to step down as editor of a liberal Roman Catholic publication, his associates said. Father Leonardo Boff also was pressured by the Vatican to stop teaching theology at an institute in Petropolis, a mountain town near Rio de Janeiro, and to refrain from calls for greater democracy in the church, said Boff's brother, Waldimar, who is also a Franciscan friar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
Pope John Paul II's crackdown on the progressive clergy in Brazil, symbolized by the silencing of theologian Leonardo Boff, has sharpened divisions in the leadership here of the Roman Catholic Church, the world's third largest.
NEWS
March 22, 1985
A Brazilian Franciscan priest, Father Leonardo Boff, said he will "listen and follow" Roman Catholic Church recommendations but "will not be interrupted" by Vatican findings that his teachings on liberation theology are "indefensible" and "dangerous." Boff was responding to Vatican criticism of his 1981 book, "Church: Charisma and Power," which accused the church of elitism and failing to take an active stand on human rights and politically sensitive issues.
NEWS
May 9, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The Vatican has ordered Brazil's controversial liberation theologian, Father Leonardo Boff, to maintain a period of silence in which he is not to write or discuss his work, the Vatican said today. A Vatican statement did not say how long the period will last, but church sources familiar with the case confirmed press reports from Brazil that it is expected to last one year.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | Compiled from, wire and staff reports
Leading Roman Catholic clerics identified with "liberation theology" attended a week-long seminar in Mexico to discuss ways to spread their ideas in the Third World, despite the reservations of Pope John Paul II about the political objectives of the movement. The clerics at the conference sent a message of support to Nicaraguan Foreign Minister Miguel d'Escoto, a priest in the Maryknoll order.
BOOKS
May 12, 1985
In her review of Leonardo Boff's "Liberation Theology and the Institutional Church" (May 5), Marianne Sawicki says that the Vatican objected to Boff comparing "sacramental worship to means of production that polarizes the clergy and laity into two conflicting classes" and adds that "the comparison limps because (God's) grace is not a material thing." But however limping that comparison, Boff's position is not "provincial" or peculiar to Brazilian culture, as Sawicki suggests. In "Stamp Out Sacramental Tyranny," an article in this month's (May, 1985)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2000
In Nigeria, Muslim and Christian militants are killing one another in widening intercommunal violence. Indonesia, Egypt and Lebanon also have been swept up by the most intense strife between Christianity and Islam in generations. Yet beneath the outburst of religious violence, a transformation is taking place with significant implications for the future coexistence of Islam and Christianity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
Pope John Paul II's crackdown on the progressive clergy in Brazil, symbolized by the silencing of theologian Leonardo Boff, has sharpened divisions in the leadership here of the Roman Catholic Church, the world's third largest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1986
America is watching with keen interest and profound concern the tensions among Roman Catholics in the United States, and the tensions between the national church and the Vatican. Some of the issues, including that of authority, have a relevance to secular society as well. The role of national conferences of bishops in the Roman Catholic Church was enhanced by the Second Vatican Council that concluded its work 21 years ago.
NEWS
May 10, 1985 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Father Leonardo Boff, the controversial liberation theologian from Brazil who was formally warned that his teachings posed a danger to the church, has been ordered to obey a period of silence, the Vatican announced Thursday. The Franciscan priest, whose writings have taken the church to task for "elitism," is forbidden to write or speak in public for an unspecified time, according to a Vatican statement. Church sources and reports from Brazil suggested that the ban would last about a year.
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