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Leonel Fernandez

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NEWS
August 17, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonel Fernandez became the Dominican Republic's youngest president Friday, ending a long history of strongman dictators and promising political and economic reform for this troubled Caribbean nation.
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WORLD
August 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Leonel Fernandez was sworn in as the Dominican Republic's president, returning to power after four years out of office to lead a nation struggling through its worst economic crisis in decades. He promised to cut spending by 20%, saying that many government jobs created since 2000 would be eliminated and that he would reschedule debt payments.
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WORLD
August 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Leonel Fernandez was sworn in as the Dominican Republic's president, returning to power after four years out of office to lead a nation struggling through its worst economic crisis in decades. He promised to cut spending by 20%, saying that many government jobs created since 2000 would be eliminated and that he would reschedule debt payments.
WORLD
May 16, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Magaly del Rosario dutifully hauls the plastic furniture under the eaves at Harry's Bar to keep it dry in case a customer drops by between deluges in these early weeks of the rainy season. It's more than the threat of getting wet, though, that has made a veritable ghost town of the quaint cobblestone expanse of Plaza de la Hispanidad and the dozen shops and restaurants arrayed around it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996
The July 4 editorial proclaimed, "New Era for Dominican Republic: A clean election marks the end of Balaguer's long dominance." Really? Everyone agrees this was a clean and fair election. But the party of the newly elected president, Leonel Fernandez, a lawyer raised in New York City, has only one seat in the 30-member Dominican Senate, and 12 out of 120 representatives in the Chamber of Deputies. Control of the Congress remains where it has been for four decades: in the hands of Joaquin Balaguer and his alter ego and fellow octogenarian, Juan Bosch.
WORLD
May 16, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Magaly del Rosario dutifully hauls the plastic furniture under the eaves at Harry's Bar to keep it dry in case a customer drops by between deluges in these early weeks of the rainy season. It's more than the threat of getting wet, though, that has made a veritable ghost town of the quaint cobblestone expanse of Plaza de la Hispanidad and the dozen shops and restaurants arrayed around it.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
President Leonel Fernandez retired 24 of the nation's 70 generals, acting to streamline the military and cut state expenses. Since most of the generals were associates of former President Joaquin Balaguer, the move also appeared to be an attempt by Fernandez to emerge from the shadow of the man who helped him become president in August.
WORLD
May 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The campaign of President Leonel Fernandez declared that he won election to a third term with enough votes to avoid a runoff. Campaign chief Francisco Javier Garcia said that according to a tally by Fernandez's centrist Dominican Liberation Party, with 61% of the votes counted, the president had won nearly 54%.
WORLD
August 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
President Leonel Fernandez promised to boost agricultural production and warned of dire economic times as he was sworn in for a third term. Fernandez coasted to reelection in May after two nonconsecutive terms as president, bolstered by growth in tourism and foreign investment. He unveiled dozens of new projects, including dams and highways.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Leonel Fernandez, an attorney who grew up in the United States, edged out a three-time candidate to be elected president of the Dominican Republic. Fernandez replaces longtime leader Joaquin Balaguer, whose support helped him come from behind to win. After finishing second in the first round May 16, Fernandez received 51% of Sunday's vote, compared with 49% for social democrat Jose Francisco Pena Gomez, election officials announced.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonel Fernandez became the Dominican Republic's youngest president Friday, ending a long history of strongman dictators and promising political and economic reform for this troubled Caribbean nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996
The July 4 editorial proclaimed, "New Era for Dominican Republic: A clean election marks the end of Balaguer's long dominance." Really? Everyone agrees this was a clean and fair election. But the party of the newly elected president, Leonel Fernandez, a lawyer raised in New York City, has only one seat in the 30-member Dominican Senate, and 12 out of 120 representatives in the Chamber of Deputies. Control of the Congress remains where it has been for four decades: in the hands of Joaquin Balaguer and his alter ego and fellow octogenarian, Juan Bosch.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Hipolito Mejia assumed the presidency of the Dominican Republic and repeated his promises to help the poor--promises that businesspeople fear could reverse the Caribbean nation's recent economic boom. The 59-year-old agronomist succeeds Leonel Fernandez, whose pro-investment policies and privatization of state monopolies helped boost the economy by 40% in recent years but failed to lift most Dominicans out of poverty.
WORLD
October 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Three Dominican banking executives were convicted for their roles in a 2003 financial collapse that crippled the Caribbean country's economy. The trial focused on the management and collapse of the country's largest bank, Banco Intercontinental, which led to the failure of two other large banks as international lenders helped prop up the Dominican economy. The resulting costly central bank bailout spurred 30% annual inflation.
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