Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLeonid Kravchuk
IN THE NEWS

Leonid Kravchuk

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Final returns in Ukraine's presidential election showed a nation polarized between the pro-Russian east, which supported former Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma, and the more nationalist west, which supported President Leonid Kravchuk. The two will face a July runoff. Kravchuk had 38% of the vote in Sunday's balloting, while Kuchma finished second in the seven-man race with 31%.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Final returns in Ukraine's presidential election showed a nation polarized between the pro-Russian east, which supported former Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma, and the more nationalist west, which supported President Leonid Kravchuk. The two will face a July runoff. Kravchuk had 38% of the vote in Sunday's balloting, while Kuchma finished second in the seven-man race with 31%.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Friday that he is "personally well-satisfied" with Ukraine's progress toward dismantling former Soviet nuclear weapons still on its territory, despite mixed assessments by government and private analysts on how much has been done. At a news conference with visiting Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk, Clinton expressed confidence that the Ukrainian Parliament will ratify the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, as Kravchuk has pledged.
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Divided sharply over whether to look toward Europe or Russia, voters in this nation's presidential election put incumbent Leonid Kravchuk ahead in the west, favored former Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma in the east and sent them into a two-man runoff next month. Official returns Monday from 16 of 27 regions gave Kuchma 36% of the votes in Sunday's election to 30% for Kravchuk, followed by five other candidates. But that count was somewhat weighted toward Kuchma's expected strongholds.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The man on whom the Clinton Administration has pinned its hopes for Ukrainian nuclear disarmament may look like a lame duck when he arrives in Washington for an official visit Thursday. But President Leonid Kravchuk isn't nicknamed "the wily fox" for nothing.
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Divided sharply over whether to look toward Europe or Russia, voters in this nation's presidential election put incumbent Leonid Kravchuk ahead in the west, favored former Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma in the east and sent them into a two-man runoff next month. Official returns Monday from 16 of 27 regions gave Kuchma 36% of the votes in Sunday's election to 30% for Kravchuk, followed by five other candidates. But that count was somewhat weighted toward Kuchma's expected strongholds.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The agreement announced by President Clinton to peacefully dismantle Ukraine's huge nuclear arsenal will be a diplomatic triumph for both Russia and the United States--if it works. But no one, including the U.S. officials who negotiated it, is sure that it will. The agreement would erase the world's third-largest nuclear arsenal, more than 1,800 warheads that posed a long-term threat to Russia, the United States and much of Europe.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A furious voice rang out from the packed auditorium, interrupting the speaker. "Whose fault is it that the Soviet Union collapsed?" Leonid Kuchma, President Leonid Kravchuk's main challenger to lead this nuclear-armed nation, peered into the crowd. "I was against that uncivilized divorce," said the former rocket builder and ex-premier, referring to the breakup of the 15 Soviet republics three years ago. "It cut through economic ties like through living flesh."
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before President Leonid Kravchuk signed a historic agreement with the United States and Russia on Friday to give up all of Ukraine's nuclear weapons, the headlines here were scornful. On the morning of the signing ceremony in Moscow, three of Kiev's leading newspapers reported not on the details of the groundbreaking trilateral accord but on what some Ukrainians considered to be condescending behavior by President Clinton during his two-hour visit to Kiev late Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1992 | Panorama is a Russian-language weekly published Thursdays in Los Angeles. From a commentary by columnist Evgeny Levin. Translated by Ludmila Genn. and
So far, the international activity of the President-elect has consisted of telephone conversations with the leaders of many countries who called to congratulate him. . . . Before calling Clinton, Russian President Yeltsin had a long conversation with Bush, the contents of which were not reported. . . . Polish President Lech Walesa and Hungarian Foreign Minister Geza Jeszenszky formally congratulated Clinton and informally expressed their regrets on Bush's loss.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A furious voice rang out from the packed auditorium, interrupting the speaker. "Whose fault is it that the Soviet Union collapsed?" Leonid Kuchma, President Leonid Kravchuk's main challenger to lead this nuclear-armed nation, peered into the crowd. "I was against that uncivilized divorce," said the former rocket builder and ex-premier, referring to the breakup of the 15 Soviet republics three years ago. "It cut through economic ties like through living flesh."
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Friday that he is "personally well-satisfied" with Ukraine's progress toward dismantling former Soviet nuclear weapons still on its territory, despite mixed assessments by government and private analysts on how much has been done. At a news conference with visiting Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk, Clinton expressed confidence that the Ukrainian Parliament will ratify the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, as Kravchuk has pledged.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The man on whom the Clinton Administration has pinned its hopes for Ukrainian nuclear disarmament may look like a lame duck when he arrives in Washington for an official visit Thursday. But President Leonid Kravchuk isn't nicknamed "the wily fox" for nothing.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before President Leonid Kravchuk signed a historic agreement with the United States and Russia on Friday to give up all of Ukraine's nuclear weapons, the headlines here were scornful. On the morning of the signing ceremony in Moscow, three of Kiev's leading newspapers reported not on the details of the groundbreaking trilateral accord but on what some Ukrainians considered to be condescending behavior by President Clinton during his two-hour visit to Kiev late Wednesday.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The agreement announced by President Clinton to peacefully dismantle Ukraine's huge nuclear arsenal will be a diplomatic triumph for both Russia and the United States--if it works. But no one, including the U.S. officials who negotiated it, is sure that it will. The agreement would erase the world's third-largest nuclear arsenal, more than 1,800 warheads that posed a long-term threat to Russia, the United States and much of Europe.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | Reuters
Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma accused Ukraine's president Saturday of stripping him of his powers and said he will press ahead with plans to resign, the official Ukrinform news agency reported. The agency said Kuchma told industrialists in central Ukraine that he had no room to pursue his policies after President Leonid Kravchuk placed himself at the head of government. "In Ukraine, the prime minister's base has been eliminated.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | Associated Press
President Leonid Kravchuk on Wednesday named an opponent of rapid economic reform as acting prime minister. Yefim Zviagilsky, a conservative from Ukraine's industrial heartland, was appointed a day after Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma stepped down, and lawmakers called on Kravchuk to form a new government. Kuchma said he quit because he was not given enough power over economic policy. Ukraine's economy has stagnated since the country broke from the Soviet Union two years ago.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|