Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLeonid Shebarshin
IN THE NEWS

Leonid Shebarshin

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the catacombs of Moscow's Dynamo Stadium, in a small office that is dimly lit and eerily quiet, former KGB officers still come to pay their respects to the Soviet Union's last spymaster. Leonid Shebarshin's business card now reads, "Russian National Economic Security Service," a private security firm through which he is trying to make his way in the new crime-anxious Russia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the catacombs of Moscow's Dynamo Stadium, in a small office that is dimly lit and eerily quiet, former KGB officers still come to pay their respects to the Soviet Union's last spymaster. Leonid Shebarshin's business card now reads, "Russian National Economic Security Service," a private security firm through which he is trying to make his way in the new crime-anxious Russia.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union's last KGB spymaster acknowledged Friday that Moscow had lost the "secret war" of espionage and paid tribute to German, French and U.S. opponents. He also credited the services of Iraq and Israel. Leonid Shebarshin, dismissed as head of the KGB's intelligence section after last August's failed coup, said Russians who had spied for Washington were driven by "boundless selfishness and egoism compounded by absence of any strength of will."
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev replaced leaders of the failed coup, naming a temporary defense minister, KGB chairman and interior minister. The new appointees: DEFENSE: Gen. Mikhail A. Moiseyev, 52, who has been chief of the Soviet general staff, named acting defense minister, replacing Dmitri T. Yazov.
NEWS
August 24, 1991
Under pressure from Boris N. Yeltsin, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev moved to replace more ministers and government officials. A look at who is in and who is out: FOREIGN MINISTER: Advises on foreign policy OUT: Alexander A. Bessmertnykh President Gorbachev criticized him as being "quite passive" during the abortive three-day coup.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move to break up the KGB as the Soviet Union's once all-powerful intelligence and security force, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Monday appointed his chief foreign policy adviser to direct its foreign intelligence activities and place them under an independent state agency. Yevgeny M.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kremlin's new spymaster, already at work on creating a better image for Soviet intelligence, pledged Wednesday to prevent a return to the Cold War, to submit much of his agency's work to public scrutiny and to focus on analysis rather than cloak-and-dagger games. "If you think intelligence is men in gray raincoats standing behind buildings eavesdropping on conversations and occasionally using clubs to 'take people out,' then my appointment would seem very out of place," Yevgeny M.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in naming his first replacements for the engineers of the failed coup, has chosen senior government officers who appear to be representatives of the Communist Old Guard rather than apostles of reform, according to U.S. analysts. U.S. officials voiced disappointment at the choices, interpreting them as either place-holders in a period of transition or a sign of Gorbachev's continued unwillingness to fully embrace the reform agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1990 | MARK KRAMER, Mark Kramer is a research fellow at Brown University's Center for Foreign Policy Development and a fellow of Harvard University's Russian Research Center.
Just when the Cold War had been officially pronounced over, the abrupt resignation of Eduard A. Shevardnadze as Soviet foreign minister, coupled with his warnings of an impending "dictatorship" in Moscow, has cast doubt on the whole future of the Soviet Union and of East-West relations. Endless speculation has ensued in the West about Shevardnadze's speech. Most of the speculation so far, however, has focused on the wrong issues.
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | David Wise, David Wise is the coauthor of "The Invisible Government" and author of "Spy: The Inside Story of How the FBI's Robert Hanssen Betrayed America."
During the Cold War, it was no easy matter for a Russian to volunteer to spy for the CIA. Take the case of Adolf Tolkachev, an aircraft designer in Moscow. Risking his life, Tolkachev tried half a dozen times to approach the agency. He left notes in the cars of two successive CIA station chiefs in Moscow. He got nowhere.
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief of Russia's secret police has criticized a presidential order to transform his ministry, the former KGB, into a new counterintelligence agency, calling it demoralizing and potentially damaging to national security. "You surely know the popular expression 'If you want to weaken performance, start a reorganization.' In this case, that is what's happening," said Nikolai M. Golushko, the man put in charge of the abrupt task by President Boris N. Yeltsin.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|