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Leonid V Shebarshin

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NEWS
August 23, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev replaced leaders of the failed coup, naming a temporary defense minister, KGB chairman and interior minister. The new appointees: DEFENSE: Gen. Mikhail A. Moiseyev, 52, who has been chief of the Soviet general staff, named acting defense minister, replacing Dmitri T. Yazov.
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NEWS
August 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union's last KGB spymaster acknowledged Friday that Moscow had lost the "secret war" of espionage and paid tribute to German, French and U.S. opponents. He also credited the services of Iraq and Israel. Leonid Shebarshin, dismissed as head of the KGB's intelligence section after last August's failed coup, said Russians who had spied for Washington were driven by "boundless selfishness and egoism compounded by absence of any strength of will."
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NEWS
August 24, 1991
Under pressure from Boris N. Yeltsin, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev moved to replace more ministers and government officials. A look at who is in and who is out: FOREIGN MINISTER: Advises on foreign policy OUT: Alexander A. Bessmertnykh President Gorbachev criticized him as being "quite passive" during the abortive three-day coup.
NEWS
August 24, 1991
Under pressure from Boris N. Yeltsin, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev moved to replace more ministers and government officials. A look at who is in and who is out: FOREIGN MINISTER: Advises on foreign policy OUT: Alexander A. Bessmertnykh President Gorbachev criticized him as being "quite passive" during the abortive three-day coup.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The sweeping purge of hard-line officials launched by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin turns Moscow sharply toward reforms long espoused by the United States, President Bush and other U.S. officials said Friday. Bush, assessing Gorbachev's actions from his vacation home in Kennebunkport, Me.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in naming his first replacements for the engineers of the failed coup, has chosen senior government officers who appear to be representatives of the Communist Old Guard rather than apostles of reform, according to U.S. analysts. U.S. officials voiced disappointment at the choices, interpreting them as either place-holders in a period of transition or a sign of Gorbachev's continued unwillingness to fully embrace the reform agenda.
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union's last KGB spymaster acknowledged Friday that Moscow had lost the "secret war" of espionage and paid tribute to German, French and U.S. opponents. He also credited the services of Iraq and Israel. Leonid Shebarshin, dismissed as head of the KGB's intelligence section after last August's failed coup, said Russians who had spied for Washington were driven by "boundless selfishness and egoism compounded by absence of any strength of will."
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief of Russia's secret police has criticized a presidential order to transform his ministry, the former KGB, into a new counterintelligence agency, calling it demoralizing and potentially damaging to national security. "You surely know the popular expression 'If you want to weaken performance, start a reorganization.' In this case, that is what's happening," said Nikolai M. Golushko, the man put in charge of the abrupt task by President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, back in office but perhaps no longer truly the supreme leader of his land, on Thursday fired the defense minister, KGB chief and other plotters who tried to overthrow him and signaled a wide-scale purge of other Communist reactionaries.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaves skittered across the quiet streets of East Berlin's Karlshorst district on the autumn day that would be East Germany's last, and anticipation filled the air. It was Oct. 2, 1990, a day before Germany was to become united for the first time since the end of World War II, and Karlshorst, like all of Germany, was preparing for the party of the century. Deep inside one nondescript Karlshorst house, however, the Cold War was still very much underway.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The sweeping purge of hard-line officials launched by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin turns Moscow sharply toward reforms long espoused by the United States, President Bush and other U.S. officials said Friday. Bush, assessing Gorbachev's actions from his vacation home in Kennebunkport, Me.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in naming his first replacements for the engineers of the failed coup, has chosen senior government officers who appear to be representatives of the Communist Old Guard rather than apostles of reform, according to U.S. analysts. U.S. officials voiced disappointment at the choices, interpreting them as either place-holders in a period of transition or a sign of Gorbachev's continued unwillingness to fully embrace the reform agenda.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev replaced leaders of the failed coup, naming a temporary defense minister, KGB chairman and interior minister. The new appointees: DEFENSE: Gen. Mikhail A. Moiseyev, 52, who has been chief of the Soviet general staff, named acting defense minister, replacing Dmitri T. Yazov.
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top officials of Russia's secret police, known these days as the FSB, gathered last month to celebrate the founding of their agency in 1917 by Communist leader V.I. Lenin. Vladimir V. Putin, an ex-KGB colonel who had become prime minister only months earlier, spoke to his compatriots and reported with a smile: "A group of FSB colleagues dispatched to work undercover in the government has successfully completed its first mission."
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