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Leonie Rysanek

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NEWS
March 10, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonie Rysanek, an internationally lauded soprano who graced opera stages from Vienna to Los Angeles in more than 2,100 performances over nearly half a century, has died. She was 71. Rysanek, who retired less than two years ago, died Saturday night in her native Vienna, apparently of cancer. Best known for singing the roles of Wagner and Richard Strauss heroines, Rysanek made her last appearance in Los Angeles in 1994 as Klytamnestra in Strauss' "Elektra."
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NEWS
March 10, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonie Rysanek, an internationally lauded soprano who graced opera stages from Vienna to Los Angeles in more than 2,100 performances over nearly half a century, has died. She was 71. Rysanek, who retired less than two years ago, died Saturday night in her native Vienna, apparently of cancer. Best known for singing the roles of Wagner and Richard Strauss heroines, Rysanek made her last appearance in Los Angeles in 1994 as Klytamnestra in Strauss' "Elektra."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA
The diva once told an interviewer, "I'm a simple person, really, absolutely not complicated." Sure, just like Henry Higgins was "An Ordinary Man." Coming from Leonie Rysanek, a veteran prima donna, a soprano who at the time of the interview, in 1986, had achieved 37 years on the opera stage, the statement was disingenuous in the extreme.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1996 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Opera devotees are a sentimental lot. They really savor a sensational debut. But there's one thing they adore even more: a sensational farewell. They got what they adore Tuesday night at the Met. Leonie Rysanek, a beloved bigger-than-life diva in residence since 1959, was singing her operatic swan song in America. The vehicle was a splendidly somber new production of Tchaikovsky's "Pikovaya Dama," a.k.a. "The Queen of Spades," at the end of its first run.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drawing herself upright, her blue eyes sparkling, Metropolitan Opera star Leonie Rysanek delivers a weighty opinion about the murderous, guilt-ridden queen Klytamnestra in Richard Strauss' "Elektra." For one who exploits the drama in every part, Klytamnestra provides the full range of emotions--from power-wielding craziness to pitiful neediness. "Of course, she's horrid," says Rysanek, who will sing the role for Los Angeles Music Center Opera, beginning Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1996 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Opera devotees are a sentimental lot. They really savor a sensational debut. But there's one thing they adore even more: a sensational farewell. They got what they adore Tuesday night at the Met. Leonie Rysanek, a beloved bigger-than-life diva in residence since 1959, was singing her operatic swan song in America. The vehicle was a splendidly somber new production of Tchaikovsky's "Pikovaya Dama," a.k.a. "The Queen of Spades," at the end of its first run.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
No one thought "Jenufa" had much of a chance when the San Francisco Opera first staged Janacek's complex masterpiece in 1969. The vocal lines, predicated on the special cadences of the Czech language, resisted comfortable translation. For all its graceful lyrical flights and violent dramatic outbursts, the quasi-romantic score struck many listeners as short-winded and oddly esoteric.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
For 11 minutes, Luciano Pavarotti soaked up the bravos after Saturday night's performance of "Tosca" at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. At the end of what the 68-year-old tenor said was his final night of staged opera, he stuck out his arms, waved to the crowd, put his hands together and bowed his head in tribute to his fans. He touched his heart, and he blew kisses. His face, still stained near his right eye with fake blood from the performance, was filled with emotion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES
Saddleback College will open a free series of seven opera films--some movies and some taped live performances--Jan. 21 with Puccini's "Turandot." Eva Marton sings the title role. Michael Sylvester is Calaf, the Unknown Prince. Donald Runnicles conducts. The rest of the series: * Feb. 4: Puccini's "Madama Butterfly," with Yasuko Hayashi and Hak-Nam Kim. Lorin Maazel conducts. * Feb. 18: Bizet's "Carmen," with Placido Domingo and Julia Migenes-Johnson. Maazel conducts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1986 | JOHN VOLAND
What a challenge a video director faces in trying to compress the Brobdingnagian features of a Wagner opera within the Lilliputian limits of the small screen! Still, credit must go to the undercredited director--who turns out to be Brian Large--for making the Metropolitan Opera's "Lohengrin" TV broadcast--scheduled to air tonight at 8 on Channels 28, 15, 24 and 50, with stereo simulcast in most areas--as clear and as involving a story as possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drawing herself upright, her blue eyes sparkling, Metropolitan Opera star Leonie Rysanek delivers a weighty opinion about the murderous, guilt-ridden queen Klytamnestra in Richard Strauss' "Elektra." For one who exploits the drama in every part, Klytamnestra provides the full range of emotions--from power-wielding craziness to pitiful neediness. "Of course, she's horrid," says Rysanek, who will sing the role for Los Angeles Music Center Opera, beginning Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA
The diva once told an interviewer, "I'm a simple person, really, absolutely not complicated." Sure, just like Henry Higgins was "An Ordinary Man." Coming from Leonie Rysanek, a veteran prima donna, a soprano who at the time of the interview, in 1986, had achieved 37 years on the opera stage, the statement was disingenuous in the extreme.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
No one thought "Jenufa" had much of a chance when the San Francisco Opera first staged Janacek's complex masterpiece in 1969. The vocal lines, predicated on the special cadences of the Czech language, resisted comfortable translation. For all its graceful lyrical flights and violent dramatic outbursts, the quasi-romantic score struck many listeners as short-winded and oddly esoteric.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Complete casts for the 1987-88 season of seven operas, plus a tentative schedule of eight productions--including Rossini's "Tancredi," with Marilyn Horne in the title role--for the 1988-89 season, were released by Los Angeles Music Center Opera on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1992 | WALTER PRICE
RICHARD STRAUSS: "Salome," with Cheryl Studer, Horst Hiestermann, Bryn Terfel, Leonie Rysanek, others; Berlin Opera Orchestra, Giuseppe Sinopoli, conducting. Deutsche Grammophon 431 810-2. STRAUSS: "Salome," with Eva Marton, Heinz Zednik, Bernd Weikl, Brigitte Fassbaender, others; Berlin Philharmonic, Zubin Mehta, conducting. Sony Classical S2K 46717. When the chips are down, a performance of "Salome" is a performance by Salome.
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