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HEALTH
August 9, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When the so-called fat-controlling hormone leptin was first discovered, scientists predicted it would be the basis for a bonanza of new obesity-fighting drugs. That was 15 years ago. Today, scientists are still trying to develop leptin-based weight-loss therapies, but progress has been slower than anticipated. That's because leptin appears to affect several biochemical pathways in the body, and scientists still can't agree on how, precisely, the hormone works. Researchers do, however, know one thing about leptin: "It's way more complicated than we first thought," says Susan Fried, a professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.
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NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
Remember the experimental weight-loss drug rimonabant, touted as a potential "miracle pill" that could help obese smokers kick the habit, lose weight and keep it off for two years? Marketed in Europe as Acomplia, the drug made it well into the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval process before it was linked in 2008 to a doubling of depression risk in those taking it. The drug ended up withdrawn from the European market and pulled from FDA consideration, another failed medication on the ash heap of obesity treatments.
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NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Eating a low-calorie diet in which carbs have a heavier presence at dinner may offer a host of healthful benefits, a study finds. Researchers randomly assigned 100 obese male and female Israeli police officers age 25 to 55 to one of two diets for six months: a standard low-calorie diet (this served as the control group), or a low-calorie diet that offered more carbs at dinner. Both diets contained about 1,300 to 1,500 calories per day. Nutritional breakdowns were the same for both groups as well: 20% protein, 30% to 35% fat, and 45% to 50% carbohydrate.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Eating a low-calorie diet in which carbs have a heavier presence at dinner may offer a host of healthful benefits, a study finds. Researchers randomly assigned 100 obese male and female Israeli police officers age 25 to 55 to one of two diets for six months: a standard low-calorie diet (this served as the control group), or a low-calorie diet that offered more carbs at dinner. Both diets contained about 1,300 to 1,500 calories per day. Nutritional breakdowns were the same for both groups as well: 20% protein, 30% to 35% fat, and 45% to 50% carbohydrate.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
Remember the experimental weight-loss drug rimonabant, touted as a potential "miracle pill" that could help obese smokers kick the habit, lose weight and keep it off for two years? Marketed in Europe as Acomplia, the drug made it well into the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval process before it was linked in 2008 to a doubling of depression risk in those taking it. The drug ended up withdrawn from the European market and pulled from FDA consideration, another failed medication on the ash heap of obesity treatments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1999
Re "Why Eating Is So Natural," by Ellen Ruppel Shell, Opinion, Nov. 7: Jeffrey Friedman would have been wise to look at other cultures where food is plentiful before wasting five years studying leptin. A cursory glance would have told him that obesity is endemic only in America and thus unlikely to be totally genetic in origin. Now that obese Americans can no longer claim to be victims of "leptin insufficiency," perhaps they will address the true reasons for their obesity--themselves.
NEWS
September 24, 2010
After a tough workout there's nothing better than sliding into a chilly pool to cool off. That cool-down might have a down side, however--increasing your appetite. A study found that water immersion following a bout of exercise may make exercisers likely to eat more compared with those who didn't get into the water. Australian researchers tested 10 physically active men who went through three experiments. In each they ran on the treadmill for 40 minutes, but in one they were immersed chest-high in cold water (59 degrees Fahrenheit)
NEWS
September 12, 2010
Maintaining weight loss is tough--most people eventually regain the weight they lose. A new study suggests that levels of appetite hormone in the body before dieting could forecast how many pounds are put back on after dieting. Researchers looked at appetite hormone levels among 104 men and women who were obese and overweight. The participants went on an eight-week diet and had fasting hormone levels checked 32 weeks later. One of the hormones, ghrelin, increases appetite, with levels rising before eating.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
Adequate nighttime sleep has been shown in many studies to influence body weight in adults. But the same pattern may also be true for infants and toddlers. A study published Monday found that how much and, here's the key -- when -- babies sleep can be important to weight gain later in life. Researchers from the University of Washington and UCLA used data from a national survey of children and adolescents to study 1,930 children ages 0 to 13. Information on the children was collected on two occasions, in 1997 and 2002.
SCIENCE
April 3, 2004 | From Reuters
Leptin, a hormone that affects weight and appetite, apparently helps wire the brain in ways that might set an animal on a lifetime path to slenderness or obesity, two teams of U.S. researchers said Thursday. The studies, published in the journal Science, may take doctors a step closer to understanding whether leptin could be manipulated to help overweight people lose weight and keep it off.
NEWS
September 24, 2010
After a tough workout there's nothing better than sliding into a chilly pool to cool off. That cool-down might have a down side, however--increasing your appetite. A study found that water immersion following a bout of exercise may make exercisers likely to eat more compared with those who didn't get into the water. Australian researchers tested 10 physically active men who went through three experiments. In each they ran on the treadmill for 40 minutes, but in one they were immersed chest-high in cold water (59 degrees Fahrenheit)
NEWS
September 12, 2010
Maintaining weight loss is tough--most people eventually regain the weight they lose. A new study suggests that levels of appetite hormone in the body before dieting could forecast how many pounds are put back on after dieting. Researchers looked at appetite hormone levels among 104 men and women who were obese and overweight. The participants went on an eight-week diet and had fasting hormone levels checked 32 weeks later. One of the hormones, ghrelin, increases appetite, with levels rising before eating.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
Adequate nighttime sleep has been shown in many studies to influence body weight in adults. But the same pattern may also be true for infants and toddlers. A study published Monday found that how much and, here's the key -- when -- babies sleep can be important to weight gain later in life. Researchers from the University of Washington and UCLA used data from a national survey of children and adolescents to study 1,930 children ages 0 to 13. Information on the children was collected on two occasions, in 1997 and 2002.
HEALTH
August 9, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When the so-called fat-controlling hormone leptin was first discovered, scientists predicted it would be the basis for a bonanza of new obesity-fighting drugs. That was 15 years ago. Today, scientists are still trying to develop leptin-based weight-loss therapies, but progress has been slower than anticipated. That's because leptin appears to affect several biochemical pathways in the body, and scientists still can't agree on how, precisely, the hormone works. Researchers do, however, know one thing about leptin: "It's way more complicated than we first thought," says Susan Fried, a professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.
HEALTH
September 6, 2004 | From Reuters
Twice-daily injections of the hormone leptin, best known for regulating appetite and weight, may be able to jump-start an idling reproductive system. Doctors found that the treatment restored menstruation in five of eight female athletes who were so lean they had stopped having periods. Leptin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by fat cells, so athletes, dancers and other thin people may have less of it. It is also being studied for its role in obesity.
SCIENCE
April 3, 2004 | From Reuters
Leptin, a hormone that affects weight and appetite, apparently helps wire the brain in ways that might set an animal on a lifetime path to slenderness or obesity, two teams of U.S. researchers said Thursday. The studies, published in the journal Science, may take doctors a step closer to understanding whether leptin could be manipulated to help overweight people lose weight and keep it off.
HEALTH
September 6, 2004 | From Reuters
Twice-daily injections of the hormone leptin, best known for regulating appetite and weight, may be able to jump-start an idling reproductive system. Doctors found that the treatment restored menstruation in five of eight female athletes who were so lean they had stopped having periods. Leptin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by fat cells, so athletes, dancers and other thin people may have less of it. It is also being studied for its role in obesity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1999 | BARBARA MURPHY
Researchers say Amgen's genetically engineered hormone leptin helped a 9-year-old, 210-pound girl safely drop 36 pounds over a year. "The finding doesn't conclusively prove leptin can help millions of overweight Americans shed pounds, since most of them already have plenty of the hormone--unlike the unnamed girl in the study with a mutation in her leptin gene," researchers from the United Kingdom and Amgen wrote in this month's New England Journal of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1999
Re "Why Eating Is So Natural," by Ellen Ruppel Shell, Opinion, Nov. 7: Jeffrey Friedman would have been wise to look at other cultures where food is plentiful before wasting five years studying leptin. A cursory glance would have told him that obesity is endemic only in America and thus unlikely to be totally genetic in origin. Now that obese Americans can no longer claim to be victims of "leptin insufficiency," perhaps they will address the true reasons for their obesity--themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1999 | BARBARA MURPHY
Researchers say Amgen's genetically engineered hormone leptin helped a 9-year-old, 210-pound girl safely drop 36 pounds over a year. "The finding doesn't conclusively prove leptin can help millions of overweight Americans shed pounds, since most of them already have plenty of the hormone--unlike the unnamed girl in the study with a mutation in her leptin gene," researchers from the United Kingdom and Amgen wrote in this month's New England Journal of Medicine.
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