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Leptin Hormone

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NEWS
July 27, 1995 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Perhaps heralding a leaner future for an ever-fatter America, scientists have gotten genetically obese mice to lose a third of their weight in two weeks by injecting them with a newly discovered hormone that regulates body fat. Besides studying the grotesquely obese mice, the scientists, led by Jeffrey M. Friedman, a molecular geneticist at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Rockefeller University, have found a nearly identical hormone in human beings.
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HEALTH
September 6, 2004 | From Reuters
Twice-daily injections of the hormone leptin, best known for regulating appetite and weight, may be able to jump-start an idling reproductive system. Doctors found that the treatment restored menstruation in five of eight female athletes who were so lean they had stopped having periods. Leptin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by fat cells, so athletes, dancers and other thin people may have less of it. It is also being studied for its role in obesity.
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NEWS
June 15, 1998 | JOHN SCHWARTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
A closely watched new fat-fighting drug appears to help people lose weight, researchers announced Sunday. In its first test on human subjects, leptin, a naturally occurring hormone discovered less than four years ago, helped patients lose an average of almost 16 pounds over six months. Andrew S. Greenberg, an obesity specialist at Tufts University who led the study, cautioned that research on the drug is at a very early stage.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Americans are fatter than ever, with potentially disastrous consequences for their health, but injections of the recently discovered hormone leptin can help take some of the fat off, researchers said Tuesday at a UCLA seminar sponsored by the American Medical Assn. The proportion of obese Americans--those at least 30% over ideal body weight--rose from 12% in 1991 to 17.9% in 1998, according to researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1996 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amgen Inc.'s much-publicized anti-obesity drug will be tested on humans this summer for the first time. The Thousand Oaks-based biotechnology giant is working out final details with the Food and Drug Administration and with various obesity centers in North America that will probably test the drug--called leptin--on 50 to 100 volunteers, Amgen spokesman David Kaye said Friday.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Arguably no trend is easier to predict than the future craze for leptin, the newly discovered hormone that regulates body fat so dramatically that obese laboratory mice given injections of it shed a third of their weight in two weeks. The obese mice, weighing three times the norm--comparable to a 500-pound man--were born with a genetic defect that kept them from producing the hormone.
HEALTH
September 6, 2004 | From Reuters
Twice-daily injections of the hormone leptin, best known for regulating appetite and weight, may be able to jump-start an idling reproductive system. Doctors found that the treatment restored menstruation in five of eight female athletes who were so lean they had stopped having periods. Leptin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by fat cells, so athletes, dancers and other thin people may have less of it. It is also being studied for its role in obesity.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Americans are fatter than ever, with potentially disastrous consequences for their health, but injections of the recently discovered hormone leptin can help take some of the fat off, researchers said Tuesday at a UCLA seminar sponsored by the American Medical Assn. The proportion of obese Americans--those at least 30% over ideal body weight--rose from 12% in 1991 to 17.9% in 1998, according to researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers have identified an important signaling system in the brain that helps to control food intake and body weight and that could lead to the development of new drugs to fight obesity. A team from the University of Washington reports in Nature that the melanocortin-4 (MC4) receptor in rats acts as a mediator for leptin, a hormone known to reduce body weight by acting on the central nervous system.
HEALTH
June 16, 2003 | Diane Partie Lange
Just how restful four hours of sleep is seems to depend on the time of night you get it. Stanford University Medical Center researchers have found that men who didn't turn in until almost morning slept better than those who went to bed early. Eight participants, age 18 to 25, spent more than a week in a sleep lab, having their sleep monitored and taking various tests of their wakefulness. After two days of sleeping normally for about eight hours, their sleep was restricted to four hours a night.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | JOHN SCHWARTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
A closely watched new fat-fighting drug appears to help people lose weight, researchers announced Sunday. In its first test on human subjects, leptin, a naturally occurring hormone discovered less than four years ago, helped patients lose an average of almost 16 pounds over six months. Andrew S. Greenberg, an obesity specialist at Tufts University who led the study, cautioned that research on the drug is at a very early stage.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1996 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amgen Inc.'s much-publicized anti-obesity drug will be tested on humans this summer for the first time. The Thousand Oaks-based biotechnology giant is working out final details with the Food and Drug Administration and with various obesity centers in North America that will probably test the drug--called leptin--on 50 to 100 volunteers, Amgen spokesman David Kaye said Friday.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Arguably no trend is easier to predict than the future craze for leptin, the newly discovered hormone that regulates body fat so dramatically that obese laboratory mice given injections of it shed a third of their weight in two weeks. The obese mice, weighing three times the norm--comparable to a 500-pound man--were born with a genetic defect that kept them from producing the hormone.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Perhaps heralding a leaner future for an ever-fatter America, scientists have gotten genetically obese mice to lose a third of their weight in two weeks by injecting them with a newly discovered hormone that regulates body fat. Besides studying the grotesquely obese mice, the scientists, led by Jeffrey M. Friedman, a molecular geneticist at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Rockefeller University, have found a nearly identical hormone in human beings.
SCIENCE
April 3, 2004 | From Reuters
Leptin, a hormone that affects weight and appetite, apparently helps wire the brain in ways that might set an animal on a lifetime path to slenderness or obesity, two teams of U.S. researchers said Thursday. The studies, published in the journal Science, may take doctors a step closer to understanding whether leptin could be manipulated to help overweight people lose weight and keep it off.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By David Zucchino and Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Here's another health risk associated with carrying extra pounds: People who are obese get less protection from the annual flu shot, according to a study released Tuesday. But the authors said that people who are overweight or obese should get a seasonal flu shot anyway. The study involved 461 patients who were vaccinated in 2009 at a clinic in Chapel Hill, N.C. By several measures, the vaccine appeared to wear off faster in people who were overweight or obese than it did in people of healthy weight.  For instance, 11 months after getting a flu shot, the level of flu antibodies in the blood had dropped by a factor of four in 25% of the healthy-weight subjects.
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