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Leroy Carhart

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NEWS
November 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
The doctor at the center of a U.S. Supreme Court case over what abortion foes call "partial-birth" abortions is trying to head off eviction from his clinic. In May, a partnership of three people opposed to abortion, including state Sen. Paul Hartnett of Bellevue, bought the building used by Dr. LeRoy Carhart. They want to evict Carhart, who is one of only three doctors in Nebraska known to perform abortions.
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NATIONAL
May 27, 2012 | By Alison Knezevich
ROCKVILLE, Md. The fliers first showed up in March, dropped on doorsteps of the big homes in Todd Stave's quiet cul-de-sac. They compared him to a Nazi. Two months later and 50 miles away, new anti-abortion leaflets appeared in another peaceful suburban subdivision where Stave's in-laws lived. Bearing the same bloody images, the leaflets asked neighbors to pray for the family and to call or visit their home. Protesters also showed up at his daughter's middle school. Stave, 44, son of a doctor who performed abortions and whose office was once firebombed, decided to fight back.
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NATIONAL
May 27, 2012 | By Alison Knezevich
ROCKVILLE, Md. The fliers first showed up in March, dropped on doorsteps of the big homes in Todd Stave's quiet cul-de-sac. They compared him to a Nazi. Two months later and 50 miles away, new anti-abortion leaflets appeared in another peaceful suburban subdivision where Stave's in-laws lived. Bearing the same bloody images, the leaflets asked neighbors to pray for the family and to call or visit their home. Protesters also showed up at his daughter's middle school. Stave, 44, son of a doctor who performed abortions and whose office was once firebombed, decided to fight back.
NEWS
November 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
The doctor at the center of a U.S. Supreme Court case over what abortion foes call "partial-birth" abortions is trying to head off eviction from his clinic. In May, a partnership of three people opposed to abortion, including state Sen. Paul Hartnett of Bellevue, bought the building used by Dr. LeRoy Carhart. They want to evict Carhart, who is one of only three doctors in Nebraska known to perform abortions.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
An Omaha doctor said he would perform third-term abortions in Kansas after the slaying there of abortion provider Dr. George Tiller, but would not say whether he would open a new facility or offer the procedure at an existing practice. Dr. LeRoy Carhart spoke one day after Tiller's family decided not to reopen his Wichita clinic. Carhart declined to discuss his plans in detail during a telephone interview. Tiller's clinic was one of the few facilities in the country that performed third-trimester abortions.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest battles in the culture war will be fought at the Supreme Court, starting today. The justices will meet this morning for the first time after their holiday recess to consider a highly charged set of appeals, including whether the Boy Scouts can exclude openly gay individuals and whether states can outlaw "partial-birth" abortions. The court is expected to announce later today its decision on hearing several of these new cases.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Bush administration lawyers asked the Supreme Court on Monday to reinstate the first federal law banning a late-term abortion procedure, arguing that it should be outlawed because it is gruesome and is "never medically indicated" as a safer surgical procedure. The government's appeal asks the high court to overturn the decision of a U.S. appeals court in St. Louis, which struck down the law as unconstitutional. It came on the same day the Senate took up the nomination of Judge John G.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court set the stage Tuesday for a major ruling on abortion by agreeing to decide whether Congress can outlaw what critics call "partial-birth" abortions through the second trimester of a pregnancy. The fate of a federal law, the first nationwide ban on an abortion procedure, is probably in the hands of President Bush's two new appointees: Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The ban on "partial-birth" abortions that received final congressional approval Tuesday has little chance of taking effect unless or until the Supreme Court changes its mind on the matter, even advocates of the legislation say. Three years ago, the court, on a 5-4 vote, struck down a similar law from Nebraska because it prevented doctors from performing a kind of midterm abortion that they felt was safer for some patients. In its 1973 decision in Roe vs.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court justices, hearing their first abortion case in eight years, argued the question Tuesday of whether doctors or state legislators should have the final word on how midterm abortions are to be performed. Most of the justices took the doctors' side and suggested state laws banning "partial-birth" abortions go too far by prohibiting what some medical experts say is the safer method of performing these abortions.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Senate has spent the week debating how doctors may perform abortions at the midterm of a pregnancy. Republican leaders who oppose all abortions say they want to outlaw a single procedure, which they refer to as "partial-birth abortion," a term a former Florida congressman coined in 1995. They describe this procedure as gruesome, abhorrent and immoral. It is "the brutal killing of a child literally inches from being born," said Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.), the bill's sponsor.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
This post has been corrected. For details, see the note at the bottom. Premiering today at the Sundance Film Festival as part of the U.S. documentary competition, “After Tiller” is an intimate and heartfelt look at the four doctors performing third-trimester abortions in the United States, doing so even after the 2009 assassination of such a physician, Dr. George Tiller. Directed by Martha Shane and Lana Wilson, who spent almost three years on the project, the film brings an emotional clarity to an issue in which every nuanced turn of phrase has been made politically complicated.
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