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Leroy Hood

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MAGAZINE
October 20, 1985 | PAUL CIOTTI
When you walk out of the elevator and into Leroy Hood's molecular biology lab on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, you don't get any particular sense of electricity in the work spaces or tension in the halls. Despite the profusion of centrifuges, tissue cultures and microscopes, the atmosphere seems so drowsily low-key that the place could easily be a junior college biology lab instead of one of the most respected, successful and, in some circles, feared facilities in the country.
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MAGAZINE
December 20, 1992
Your Nov. 8 article by Daniel J. Kevles and Leroy Hood, "The Genetic Labyrinth," is exciting information. To think that eventually, though not in our lifetime nor in the lifetime of our children's children, the world will become an acutely intelligent state is exhilarating. Eugenics is the future. When other life forms from foreign galaxies join ours, we will have the capacities to compete and to gain the status of a superpower of the known universe. Money will be powerless; only information will determine one's future.
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MAGAZINE
December 20, 1992
Your Nov. 8 article by Daniel J. Kevles and Leroy Hood, "The Genetic Labyrinth," is exciting information. To think that eventually, though not in our lifetime nor in the lifetime of our children's children, the world will become an acutely intelligent state is exhilarating. Eugenics is the future. When other life forms from foreign galaxies join ours, we will have the capacities to compete and to gain the status of a superpower of the known universe. Money will be powerless; only information will determine one's future.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | JOHN WILKES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine yourself facing a one-in-two chance that sometime in the middle of your life you would be stricken by a disease that caused your intellect to wither, your body to jerk and writhe uncontrollably, and your emotions to careen from manic hallucinations to suicidal depression. You would helplessly endure this torture for as long as 25 years before the affliction, called Huntington's disease, finally killed you.
NEWS
September 22, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer and
A Caltech molecular geneticist whose research has helped to revolutionize genetic engineering and biology is among the winners of this year's prestigious Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, it was announced Monday. Dr. Leroy Hood, chairman of Caltech's biology department, and Dr. Philip Leder of Harvard and Dr. Susumu Tonegawa of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology share the 1987 award for discovering the structure of antibodies. A fourth winner is Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1987
Dr. Leroy Hood, a Caltech molecular geneticist, in September was one of three scientists to win the prestigious Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for helping explain how the immune system creates an almost endless variety of antibodies to protect the human body from foreign invaders. The immune system is believed crucial to curing many of man's diseases, a fact reflected in the number of Nobel prizes granted in this field.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | JOHN WILKES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine yourself facing a one-in-two chance that sometime in the middle of your life you would be stricken by a disease that caused your intellect to wither, your body to jerk and writhe uncontrollably, and your emotions to careen from manic hallucinations to suicidal depression. You would helplessly endure this torture for as long as 25 years before the affliction, called Huntington's disease, finally killed you.
NEWS
April 25, 1991
The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation has awarded Caltech a $333,000 grant for a research project entitled "How the Gene Regulatory System Transforms an Egg Into an Embryo." Principal researchers will be biology professors Leroy Hood and Eric Davidson.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Caltech has received a $500,000 grant from the Seaver Institute to support research by biology professor Leroy Hood into the cause, diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune disorders. These are diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, in which healthy tissues are attacked and damaged by the body's immune system.
NEWS
March 29, 1990
Caltech has received a $500,000 grant from The Seaver Institute to support research by Caltech biologist Leroy Hood into the causes, diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune disorders. These are diseases in which healthy tissues are attacked and damaged by the body's own immune system. Such diseases include multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. The project concentrates on isolating and analyzing the genes that are related to immune-system cells known as T cells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1987
Dr. Leroy Hood, a Caltech molecular geneticist, in September was one of three scientists to win the prestigious Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for helping explain how the immune system creates an almost endless variety of antibodies to protect the human body from foreign invaders. The immune system is believed crucial to curing many of man's diseases, a fact reflected in the number of Nobel prizes granted in this field.
NEWS
September 22, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer and
A Caltech molecular geneticist whose research has helped to revolutionize genetic engineering and biology is among the winners of this year's prestigious Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, it was announced Monday. Dr. Leroy Hood, chairman of Caltech's biology department, and Dr. Philip Leder of Harvard and Dr. Susumu Tonegawa of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology share the 1987 award for discovering the structure of antibodies. A fourth winner is Dr.
MAGAZINE
October 20, 1985 | PAUL CIOTTI
When you walk out of the elevator and into Leroy Hood's molecular biology lab on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, you don't get any particular sense of electricity in the work spaces or tension in the halls. Despite the profusion of centrifuges, tissue cultures and microscopes, the atmosphere seems so drowsily low-key that the place could easily be a junior college biology lab instead of one of the most respected, successful and, in some circles, feared facilities in the country.
NEWS
June 7, 1992
Caltech has received a grant of $665,950 from the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation to support research into the mechanisms by which a single-celled egg becomes a highly complex organism. The grant brings the total amount of Parsons Foundation support for the project by biology professors Eric Davidson and Leroy Hood to nearly $1 million. Their studies focus on the sea urchin. Researchers will isolate all or most of the gene regulatory factors in the creation of a sea-urchin embryo from an egg.
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