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Les Mccann

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Les McCann, a regular favorite at the Alleycat Bistro, was back there Friday and Saturday, pleasing the crowd as he always does with his blues-inspired playing. Swiveling back and forth between the piano and an electric keyboard, he loomed larger than ever--literally. If his girth were the measure of his worth, he would now be at an unprecedented artistic peak. He prefers, however, to stay with the formula that has served him for many years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Gene McDaniels, who emerged as a pop singing star in the early 1960s with hits such as "A Hundred Pounds of Clay" and "Tower of Strength" and a decade later wrote Roberta Flack's No. 1 hit "Feel Like Makin' Love," has died. He was 76. McDaniels, whose career included many years as both a songwriter and a record producer, died Friday at his home in Kittery Point, Maine, after a short illness, said his wife, Karen. "I put him as the second-greatest thing I ever heard," jazz musician and vocalist Les McCann told The Times on Monday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1989 | A. JAMES LISKA
Les McCann, whose broadened musical scope in the late '60s and early '70s brought him new-found success, took what on the surface amounted to a trip down memory lane before a full house at Birdland West on Friday evening in Long Beach. But more than an exercise in nostalgia, his opening set was a solidly musical hour that showed that the pianist could find plenty of new adventures along familiar paths. Opening with a standard, "I'm in Love," McCann showed his be-bop roots as he introduced the impressive talents of trumpeter Jeff Elliott.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask a jazz musician what they did on New Year's Eve and the most likely response will be a quizzical look followed by "I worked; what else?" That's because the ringing in of the new is the one night in which, to paraphrase Garrison Keillor, the gigs abound, the joints are crowded and the prices are above average. The arrival of 2002 was no exception, with rhythms swinging across the Southland, from Fullerton's Steamers to Valley Glen's Charlie O's.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was Saturday night in Santa Barbara and the weekend ritual was under way. A football game was raging in the City College stadium, replete with floodlights and roaring crowd. But across Cabrillo Boulevard, on Ledbetter Beach, there was a ritual of another ilk. A huge, undulating crowd was being successfully seduced as only Les McCann can seduce. McCann's show was the climax of last year's Santa Barbara Jazz Festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Gene McDaniels, who emerged as a pop singing star in the early 1960s with hits such as "A Hundred Pounds of Clay" and "Tower of Strength" and a decade later wrote Roberta Flack's No. 1 hit "Feel Like Makin' Love," has died. He was 76. McDaniels, whose career included many years as both a songwriter and a record producer, died Friday at his home in Kittery Point, Maine, after a short illness, said his wife, Karen. "I put him as the second-greatest thing I ever heard," jazz musician and vocalist Les McCann told The Times on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Entering his 60th year, pianist-singer Les McCann was as busy as he'd ever been. The gospel-flavored soul-jazz giant, whose live recording of "Compared to What" with saxophonist Eddie Harris in 1969 marked the high point of jazz-pop crossover, was keeping an active touring schedule with three different bands. Music Masters had just released his recording "On the Soul Side" to good reviews. Then, in January, while on tour in Zelle, Germany, he suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO
It has been 23 years since the "Swiss Movement" album helped pianist Les McCann and saxman Eddie Harris cross over from jazz to broader pop and rock audiences. For some reason, the witty, laid-back social commentary McCann delivered on the album's signature tune, "Compared to What," appealed to both middle-age ex-beatniks and their rock-loving, hippie-era offspring. The album is still a steady seller in the United States and abroad, according to McCann.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Rhythm has been pianist Les McCann's game for more than three decades--the grooving, infectious kind of rhythm that makes the feet tap and the body move. If his opening set at Rum Runners restaurant in Seal Beach on Sunday night suggested that McCann has lost a bit of velocity in his high, hard fast-ball pieces, he more than made up for it with the funk-driven swing of his change-up patterns and an unerring eye for the rhythmic corner of the plate.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask a jazz musician what they did on New Year's Eve and the most likely response will be a quizzical look followed by "I worked; what else?" That's because the ringing in of the new is the one night in which, to paraphrase Garrison Keillor, the gigs abound, the joints are crowded and the prices are above average. The arrival of 2002 was no exception, with rhythms swinging across the Southland, from Fullerton's Steamers to Valley Glen's Charlie O's.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Entering his 60th year, pianist-singer Les McCann was as busy as he'd ever been. The gospel-flavored soul-jazz giant, whose live recording of "Compared to What" with saxophonist Eddie Harris in 1969 marked the high point of jazz-pop crossover, was keeping an active touring schedule with three different bands. Music Masters had just released his recording "On the Soul Side" to good reviews. Then, in January, while on tour in Zelle, Germany, he suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO
It has been 23 years since the "Swiss Movement" album helped pianist Les McCann and saxman Eddie Harris cross over from jazz to broader pop and rock audiences. For some reason, the witty, laid-back social commentary McCann delivered on the album's signature tune, "Compared to What," appealed to both middle-age ex-beatniks and their rock-loving, hippie-era offspring. The album is still a steady seller in the United States and abroad, according to McCann.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was Saturday night in Santa Barbara and the weekend ritual was under way. A football game was raging in the City College stadium, replete with floodlights and roaring crowd. But across Cabrillo Boulevard, on Ledbetter Beach, there was a ritual of another ilk. A huge, undulating crowd was being successfully seduced as only Les McCann can seduce. McCann's show was the climax of last year's Santa Barbara Jazz Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1989 | A. JAMES LISKA
Les McCann, whose broadened musical scope in the late '60s and early '70s brought him new-found success, took what on the surface amounted to a trip down memory lane before a full house at Birdland West on Friday evening in Long Beach. But more than an exercise in nostalgia, his opening set was a solidly musical hour that showed that the pianist could find plenty of new adventures along familiar paths. Opening with a standard, "I'm in Love," McCann showed his be-bop roots as he introduced the impressive talents of trumpeter Jeff Elliott.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Rhythm has been pianist Les McCann's game for more than three decades--the grooving, infectious kind of rhythm that makes the feet tap and the body move. If his opening set at Rum Runners restaurant in Seal Beach on Sunday night suggested that McCann has lost a bit of velocity in his high, hard fast-ball pieces, he more than made up for it with the funk-driven swing of his change-up patterns and an unerring eye for the rhythmic corner of the plate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Les McCann, a regular favorite at the Alleycat Bistro, was back there Friday and Saturday, pleasing the crowd as he always does with his blues-inspired playing. Swiveling back and forth between the piano and an electric keyboard, he loomed larger than ever--literally. If his girth were the measure of his worth, he would now be at an unprecedented artistic peak. He prefers, however, to stay with the formula that has served him for many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
Tenor saxophonist Eddie Harris, who died Tuesday of kidney cancer at 62, was an enigmatic jazz artist who never quite received the attention his talents deserved. After having an instant hit with his "Theme From Exodus" in 1961, Harris was generally associated with jazz-pop crossover music, notably so with Les McCann in the 1969 hit "Compared to What." But he also was a powerful improviser and a masterful technician, one of the first jazz players to explore the saxophone's extended range.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | PSYCHE PASCUAL
Long Beach nightclub owner Al Williams has hosted his last jazz show at Birdland West. Williams closed his jazz club Sunday night after years of struggling against declining ticket sales and a bad economy. Several jazz ensembles were featured at the closing bash. The 51-year-old drummer said he decided to close the club after months of trying to find a buyer. In February, Williams initiated Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings in an attempt to reorganize his debts.
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