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Lesley Hazleton

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Much of the discussion surrounding Mel Gibson's controversial film "The Passion of the Christ" centers on authenticity: Did Gibson stick to the gospel accounts as closely as he claims and, if so, are they historically accurate? With Gibson's film we have only to contrast what is on the screen with what is on the page to assess his declaration of biblical adherence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Much of the discussion surrounding Mel Gibson's controversial film "The Passion of the Christ" centers on authenticity: Did Gibson stick to the gospel accounts as closely as he claims and, if so, are they historically accurate? With Gibson's film we have only to contrast what is on the screen with what is on the page to assess his declaration of biblical adherence.
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NEWS
November 9, 1992 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I read "Confessions of a Fast Woman," a tough little collection of essays, with a double thrill. One of those thrills was the thrill of recognition. Here's the opening paragraph: "It began in the spring of 1988. That was when I drove at twice the speed limit. I was in a Porsche 911, and I'd never been in one before. It was a revelation. It was a seduction." As the former owner of a silver 1969 Porsche 911S (with a Targa top), I know where author Lesley Hazleton is coming from--literally.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I read "Confessions of a Fast Woman," a tough little collection of essays, with a double thrill. One of those thrills was the thrill of recognition. Here's the opening paragraph: "It began in the spring of 1988. That was when I drove at twice the speed limit. I was in a Porsche 911, and I'd never been in one before. It was a revelation. It was a seduction." As the former owner of a silver 1969 Porsche 911S (with a Targa top), I know where author Lesley Hazleton is coming from--literally.
BOOKS
January 10, 1988 | Elena Brunet
One of the most extraordinary, if unheralded, classics of American literature, "Call It Sleep" was first published in 1934. Though hailed by contemporary critics, the novel virtually disappeared until 1956 when Leslie Fiedler and Alfred Kazin individually wrote passionate appraisals of it for a symposium on "the most neglected books of the past 25 years" in American Scholar.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 1990
WHEN PETER H. GORDON of the New York State Museum began putting together an exhibition of baseball-themed art, he discovered it was a massive task. With its thrilling heroics and mesmerizing rhythms, the national pastime has captured the imaginations of American artists and writers in a way that, say, badminton or even soccer never could. What is it about baseball that makes us cherish it so?
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To mark the end of the year, here is a look at some of the more interesting automotive books of 1998: British writer Lesley Hazleton, one of the few women automotive journalists, recounts a five-month journey "into the heart, soul, and wallet of the enduring American obsession with the car" in "Driving to Detroit: An Automotive Odyssey" (Free Press: $25; 306 pages). Traveling thousands of miles in a new Ford Expedition, she observes crash tests in Dearborn, Mich.
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