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Lesley Visser

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NEWS
April 4, 1993 | JOHN SCHEIBE, Times Staff Writer
It's 7 a.m. and Lesley Visser is on the phone from New York. CBS' go-to sports reporter has slowed her fast break to Monday night's men's NCAA basketball championship game to talk about her dream career in sportswriting and broadcasting. Visser, 39, who has covered punts, jump shots and fastballs with some of the best writers and announcers in the country for almost 20 years, is nearing the top of her game.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 4, 2006 | LARRY STEWART
When CBS Sports reporter Lesley Visser first began covering the NFL for the Boston Globe at age 20, she was assigned to a New England Patriots game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Three Rivers Stadium. Back then, female reporters weren't allowed into locker rooms. So she waited in the parking lot to interview Steelers quarterback Terry Bradshaw, poised with her pen and reporter's notebook. When Bradshaw spotted her, he grabbed her pen and pad, gave her an autograph and walked away.
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SPORTS
September 22, 1990
First CBS gave us Phyllis George. Then there was Jayne Kennedy and now Lesley Visser. Is ESPN the only network that can continually find credible female sports reporters? When Visser signed off the first NFL pregame show with "It's hammer time!" she wasn't kidding. She left my head pounding. MARK BERNSTEIN Los Angeles
SPORTS
August 9, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
Lesley Visser is returning to CBS, the network she left seven years ago for ESPN and ABC. CBS announced Tuesday that Visser has been added to "The NFL Today" crew as a feature reporter and that she will cover U.S. Open tennis and college basketball as well. She also will do some work for CBS News. Visser served as a sideline reporter on "Monday Night Football" for the last three years.
SPORTS
August 9, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
Lesley Visser is returning to CBS, the network she left seven years ago for ESPN and ABC. CBS announced Tuesday that Visser has been added to "The NFL Today" crew as a feature reporter and that she will cover U.S. Open tennis and college basketball as well. She also will do some work for CBS News. Visser served as a sideline reporter on "Monday Night Football" for the last three years.
SPORTS
August 4, 2006 | LARRY STEWART
When CBS Sports reporter Lesley Visser first began covering the NFL for the Boston Globe at age 20, she was assigned to a New England Patriots game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Three Rivers Stadium. Back then, female reporters weren't allowed into locker rooms. So she waited in the parking lot to interview Steelers quarterback Terry Bradshaw, poised with her pen and reporter's notebook. When Bradshaw spotted her, he grabbed her pen and pad, gave her an autograph and walked away.
SPORTS
December 19, 1993 | MIKE DOWNEY
Some people who waste their Sunday mornings watching football must be pretty upset by the announcement that, beginning in 1994, the Fox television network will be responsible for the broadcasting of National Football Conference games and, more to the point, CBS won't. Doesn't bother me a bit. In fact, I'm very pleased. Fox is a new network with new ideas. The last new idea CBS had was to baste John Madden's turkey. Fox is also a fairly radical network.
SPORTS
August 6, 1993 | LARRY STEWART
Lesley Visser, as she talked from her New York apartment, was excited about this weekend. "I can't tell you how much I'm looking forward to sitting up and watching Sunday's game," Visser said. She was talking about an NFL exhibition between the Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys at London's Wembley Stadium. And even though it will be televised by CBS, and her "NFL Today" colleagues Greg Gumbel and Terry Bradshaw will be calling the game, that isn't what has her excited. It's sitting up.
SPORTS
July 22, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Pat Summerall and John Madden will begin their 12th season as CBS' lead announcing team on NFL games, the network said. The other announcing teams include James Brown with either John Robinson, former Ram coach, or George Starke, formerly of the Washington Redskins; and Tim Ryan with Matt Millen, who played for the Raiders, 49ers and Redskins. Also teamed are Verne Lundquist and Dan Fouts; Jim Nantz and Hank Stram, and Dick Stockton and Randy Cross.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2001 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
HBO subscribers who happen to be sports fans will have plenty to watch tonight. The evening kicks off with "Inside the NFL," which returns for its 25th season at 8 p.m. Hall of Famers Len Dawson and Nick Buoniconti, starting their 23rd year together, head a respected team that includes Cris Collinsworth, Jerry Glanville and Dan Marino. Each program features NFL Films highlights, on-location interviews, commentary, analysis and predictions.
SPORTS
December 19, 1993 | MIKE DOWNEY
Some people who waste their Sunday mornings watching football must be pretty upset by the announcement that, beginning in 1994, the Fox television network will be responsible for the broadcasting of National Football Conference games and, more to the point, CBS won't. Doesn't bother me a bit. In fact, I'm very pleased. Fox is a new network with new ideas. The last new idea CBS had was to baste John Madden's turkey. Fox is also a fairly radical network.
SPORTS
August 6, 1993 | LARRY STEWART
Lesley Visser, as she talked from her New York apartment, was excited about this weekend. "I can't tell you how much I'm looking forward to sitting up and watching Sunday's game," Visser said. She was talking about an NFL exhibition between the Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys at London's Wembley Stadium. And even though it will be televised by CBS, and her "NFL Today" colleagues Greg Gumbel and Terry Bradshaw will be calling the game, that isn't what has her excited. It's sitting up.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | JOHN SCHEIBE, Times Staff Writer
It's 7 a.m. and Lesley Visser is on the phone from New York. CBS' go-to sports reporter has slowed her fast break to Monday night's men's NCAA basketball championship game to talk about her dream career in sportswriting and broadcasting. Visser, 39, who has covered punts, jump shots and fastballs with some of the best writers and announcers in the country for almost 20 years, is nearing the top of her game.
SPORTS
September 22, 1990
First CBS gave us Phyllis George. Then there was Jayne Kennedy and now Lesley Visser. Is ESPN the only network that can continually find credible female sports reporters? When Visser signed off the first NFL pregame show with "It's hammer time!" she wasn't kidding. She left my head pounding. MARK BERNSTEIN Los Angeles
SPORTS
January 30, 1995 | BLUE RIBBON PANEL
The annual gathering of the Times blue-ribbon panel of Super Bowl commercial judges has met once again. The panel, made up of people with little or no taste, does know commercials. The following is the consensus opinion, skewed to the opinion of the person who's typing this. And the winner is . . .
SPORTS
January 18, 2006 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Here's a case of the punishment fitting the crime. Nathan Mallet, 24, a fan of the Cleveland Browns, was sentenced Tuesday to three days in jail for running onto the field during the Browns' 41-0 loss to Pittsburgh on Dec. 24. Considering Mallet could have been jailed for 30 days and fined $250, it might appear that he got off lightly. However, Cleveland Municipal Judge Joan Synenberg ordered that Mallet's jail term begin Feb.
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