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Leslie Abramson

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OPINION
April 10, 1994
Re "Abramson to Defend Erik Menendez," April 6: As a citizen of Ventura County, I am outraged that the taxpayers of Los Angeles County will be footing the bill for Leslie Abramson's legal fees for confessed murderer Eric Menendez. And what a bill it will be at $125,000 per year! The court-appointed counsel for brother Lyle indicates that the defense will not be ready for trial until later this year. Ms. Abramson will probably collect in 1995 if the past is any indication of the length of the trial for "the boys."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2004 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Music producer Phil Spector, who is charged with murdering actress Lana Clarkson, has hired criminal defense attorney Leslie Abramson to represent him. Abramson said Monday that she replaced Robert Shapiro on Thursday. She would not say why the switch was made. Shapiro, who was on O.J. Simpson's defense team, could not be reached for comment. Abramson said Spector's business manager contacted her in the middle of January.
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NEWS
December 5, 1994 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense attorney Leslie Abramson, of Menendez brothers' trial fame, has agreed to write her memoirs for a reported $500,000. Officials at Simon & Schuster confirmed Friday that Abramson has signed on but would not release the financial terms. The figure seems likely, however, since several top publishers bid for the memoirs at a New York City auction last month, according to Publishers Weekly.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeremy Strohmeyer told a judge Tuesday that he was bullied by his defense attorney into pleading guilty in 1997 to the rape and murder of 7-year-old Sherrice Iverson in a casino restroom, and that he now wants to stand trial for the murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The death penalty phase of the Menendez brothers' murder trial took a dramatic turn Thursday when a psychiatrist for Erik Menendez testified that he altered his notes of their sessions, deleting a section of "prejudicial" material at the request of defense attorney Leslie Abramson. The day's proceedings ended in mystery as Superior Court Judge Stanley M. Weisberg met behind closed doors with defense attorneys, who later were joined by prosecutors.
OPINION
January 16, 1994 | Charles L. Lindner, Charles L. Lindner, former president of the Criminal Courts Bar Assn., has been counsel of record in 13 capital cases.
The hung jury in the trial of Erik Menendez is the biggest "defense win" since Howard Weitzman kept John DeLorean out of jail for dope dealing nearly a decade ago. The Menendez juries--one for each brother--were confronted with fact situations that did not compute. One story involved blood and money; the other, "dirty secrets."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although it's uncertain whether she will work for free or for a taxpayer-paid fee, defense lawyer Leslie Abramson told a judge Wednesday that she plans to return for a second trial in the Menendez brothers murder case. "I do expect to be here, your honor, for the duration," Abramson, who represents younger brother Erik Menendez, told Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Stanley M. Weisberg during a brief hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cloaked in mystery, the death penalty phase in the murder trial of Lyle and Erik Menendez continued to twist in an uncertain wind Monday as Erik Menendez spent most of the day meeting with his lawyers and the judge behind closed doors. As court began about 9:45 a.m., one of Erik's lawyers, Barry Levin, told Judge Stanley M. Weisberg that the defense team needed to meet with the judge to discuss "matters of dire urgency and extreme privilege."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Defense lawyer Leslie Abramson will not be subjected to a criminal investigation for requesting that a psychiatrist delete sections of his notes during the murder trial of Erik and Lyle Menendez, a district attorney's spokeswoman said Monday. "After we reviewed the trial transcripts, we determined that ours is not the office to do an investigation," said Sandi Gibbons. The State Bar of California, however, is conducting its own investigation into the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1999 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Bar of California has cleared prominent criminal defense attorney Leslie Abramson of misconduct in connection with her representation of Erik Menendez, who was convicted with his brother, Lyle, three years ago of murdering their wealthy parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Defense lawyer Leslie Abramson will not be subjected to a criminal investigation for requesting that a psychiatrist delete sections of his notes during the murder trial of Erik and Lyle Menendez, a district attorney's spokeswoman said Monday. "After we reviewed the trial transcripts, we determined that ours is not the office to do an investigation," said Sandi Gibbons. The State Bar of California, however, is conducting its own investigation into the matter.
BOOKS
February 16, 1997 | SUSIE LINFIELD, Susie Linfield teaches in the cultural reporting and criticism program at New York University's department of journalism
According to a recent Wall Street Journal poll, Americans now rank reducing crime (along with improving education) as their top priority--far outdistancing concerns about jobs, the deficit or taxes. We are, evidently, appalled and disgusted by the violence that surrounds us. Except that we are also, evidently, titillated and entertained by the violence that surrounds us, as a quick glance at last year's, this year's or next year's list of hit films and TV shows makes clear.
NEWS
April 19, 1996 | ANN O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled defense lawyer Leslie Abramson said Thursday that she never told psychiatrist William Vicary to "erase," "evaporate" or "rewrite" any notes of his sessions with Erik Menendez, as she responded in detail for the first time to allegations that temporarily threw the Menendez trial into turmoil and raised ethical questions. What she told Vicary, Abramson said in an interview, was to redact only information, such as Erik Menendez's sexual history, that Superior Court Judge Stanley M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
When the bright, unforgiving glare of the media fell on attorney Leslie Abramson, she received a painful lesson about the difference between the law and L.A. law. Regular law is what she used to practice, before the Menendez trial made her famous, before "Nightline" and her book contract. Now, Abramson is caught up in L.A. law, where celebrity is more important than the statutes and stardom descends on a few, magnifying their successes and failures all out of proportion.
OPINION
April 14, 1996
Re "Judge Keeps Abramson as Menendez's Lawyer," April 10: Is there anyone who believes that what Leslie Abramson did for her client is not done by the majority of defense lawyers? Being a defense lawyer is inherently unethical and immoral. It is not their duty to find the truth regarding guilt or innocence of their client. Their job is to "get the client off" by any means necessary, even if they know their client is guilty. Even if it means doctoring evidence or introducing innuendo and half-truths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With seven TV cameras trained on her every move, Leslie Abramson arrived Monday morning at the Van Nuys courthouse to meet her public. Clad in a regal purple dress, she tossed out bon mots and good mornings to the TV crews--who helped make her a national celebrity of sorts during the trial of Lyle and Erik Menendez. She nodded to the gaggle of groupies who would not dare miss a hearing involving the brothers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996 | BOB POOL and ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like a passenger on a careening bus who grabs the wheel after the driver passes out, Barry Levin was trying Thursday not to crash. After months of playing second fiddle to one of this country's most flamboyant attorneys in one its most sensational trials, Levin suddenly found himself in a position where he felt like he was holding the fate of Erik Menendez in his hands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As testimony in the death penalty phase of the Menendez brothers' murder trial ended Wednesday, prosecutors left jurors with two images that had never before been seen during the six-year legal drama. One was a white-haired man sobbing on the witness stand for his sister, Kitty Menendez, who was slain by her sons. The other was a family video that showed Erik Menendez smiling and waving with his parents as they boarded a small plane 11 days before the murders.
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