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Leslie Abramson

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that it is in the public interest to pay defense lawyer Leslie Abramson $125,000 a year in taxpayer funds to defend accused murderer Erik Menendez, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge Tuesday reversed a ruling and appointed her to the case. Judge Cecil J. Mills, who last month denied Abramson's request for a $100 hourly fee to handle the retrial, on Tuesday approved an unusual deal to pay her an annual fee.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense lawyer Leslie Abramson has sent supporters of the Menendez brothers an unusual solicitation letter in hopes of raising more than $1 million for the brothers' retrial. In a letter dated March 11 and sent from her law office under the banner "Erik G. Menendez Legal Defense Fund," Abramson urges "all those who expressed support for Erik," meaning those nationwide who have sent him about 3,000 letters, "to contribute what they can."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Erik Menendez is so broke that he does not even have any bank accounts, according to legal papers filed on behalf of the younger of the Beverly Hills brothers facing a retrial in the 1989 shotgun slayings of their parents. In the papers, which urge a judge to appoint defense lawyer Leslie Abramson at public expense for the retrial, Menendez asserted that his parents' $14-million estate has been "rendered worthless" by debts, taxes, legal fees and court costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although it's uncertain whether she will work for free or for a taxpayer-paid fee, defense lawyer Leslie Abramson told a judge Wednesday that she plans to return for a second trial in the Menendez brothers murder case. "I do expect to be here, your honor, for the duration," Abramson, who represents younger brother Erik Menendez, told Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Stanley M. Weisberg during a brief hearing.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge on Wednesday refused to grant lawyer Leslie Abramson taxpayer money to defend accused murderer Erik Menendez in a second trial, declaring that it was not his concern if she took on a client who says he has run out of money. Abramson--who became a national celebrity for her aggressive style in the first trial of Erik and Lyle Menendez, which ended in hung juries after six months--immediately told Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Cecil Mills that she would ask to be removed from the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With seven TV cameras trained on her every move, Leslie Abramson arrived Monday morning at the Van Nuys courthouse to meet her public. Clad in a regal purple dress, she tossed out bon mots and good mornings to the TV crews--who helped make her a national celebrity of sorts during the trial of Lyle and Erik Menendez. She nodded to the gaggle of groupies who would not dare miss a hearing involving the brothers.
OPINION
January 16, 1994 | Charles L. Lindner, Charles L. Lindner, former president of the Criminal Courts Bar Assn., has been counsel of record in 13 capital cases.
The hung jury in the trial of Erik Menendez is the biggest "defense win" since Howard Weitzman kept John DeLorean out of jail for dope dealing nearly a decade ago. The Menendez juries--one for each brother--were confronted with fact situations that did not compute. One story involved blood and money; the other, "dirty secrets."
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
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