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Leslie Cheung

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Leslie Cheung, a pop singer and actor who starred in the Oscar-nominated 1993 film "Farewell My Concubine," died Tuesday after leaping from a hotel in Hong Kong. He was 46. The star plunged from the 24th floor of the five-star Mandarin Oriental hotel in Hong Kong's central business district, said hotel spokeswoman Sally De Souza. Police said they found a note on Cheung's body in which he stated he was plagued by emotional problems.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
The opening scenes of Wong Kar-Wai's 1991 "Days of Being Wild" feature the unnervingly handsome and conceited Yuddy, played by Leslie Cheung, as an insistent suitor to Su Lizhen, Maggie Cheung's apprehensive snack bar clerk. He gradually wears her down, warning that the moment she gives in -- 3 p.m., June 16, 1960, to be exact -- will forever be etched in their memories. It certainly will remain in ours.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
In his final film, "Inner Senses," Leslie Cheung, who leaped to his death in April from the 24th floor of Hong Kong's Mandarin Oriental Hotel, plays an empathetic, workaholic psychiatrist who cures a young woman of her demons only to become overcome by his own once they begin an affair. The psychiatrist's repressed torment brings him to the very brink that in real life the Hong Kong film star did not step back from.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
In his final film, "Inner Senses," Leslie Cheung, who leaped to his death in April from the 24th floor of Hong Kong's Mandarin Oriental Hotel, plays an empathetic, workaholic psychiatrist who cures a young woman of her demons only to become overcome by his own once they begin an affair. The psychiatrist's repressed torment brings him to the very brink that in real life the Hong Kong film star did not step back from.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1997 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times staff writer
Leslie Cheung, the Hong Kong superstar and pop singer, has never been busier. He has a new film, Chen Kaige's exquisite "Temptress Moon." He is in the midst of a worldwide singing tour marking his return to the concert stage after a seven-year hiatus. And he is reaping building international acclaim for his remarkable acting talent, which spans classic screwball comedy to martial arts fantasies to the epic tragedy of Chen's 1993 "Farewell My Concubine."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
The opening scenes of Wong Kar-Wai's 1991 "Days of Being Wild" feature the unnervingly handsome and conceited Yuddy, played by Leslie Cheung, as an insistent suitor to Su Lizhen, Maggie Cheung's apprehensive snack bar clerk. He gradually wears her down, warning that the moment she gives in -- 3 p.m., June 16, 1960, to be exact -- will forever be etched in their memories. It certainly will remain in ours.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1993
I would agree with Dacy up to a point, that it's the star performances that make Hong Kong films popular. But who creates many of those star performances? Until he was cast in a John Woo film, Chow Yun-Fat's "undeniable personal charisma" didn't find much of an audience. Woo's ability to bring out the best in actors and to give them a previously unimaginable weight and depth has in the past revived the failing career of Ti Lung, made a serious actor of pop star Leslie Cheung and made Chow Yun-Fat a mega-star in Asia.
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
This energetic 1986 Hong Kong production is vintage John Woo, in which the celebrated writer-director has struck a perfect balance between emotion and highly styled violence. Its story involves two brothers--one a gangster (Ti Lung, left), the other a cop ("Farewell, My Concubine's" Leslie Cheung, right). The central figure, however, is the older's brother's former partner in crime (the charismatic Chow Yun-Fat), now destitute and crippled.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wong Kar-Wai's 1991 "Days of Being Wild" offers the flip side of his dazzling "Chung-king Express." Like the latter film, it is a romantic fable of the vicissitudes of love and the role fate plays in our lives, expressed with a bravura, go-for-broke style, but it is as dark and sober as "Chung-king" is bright and amusing. Imagine, if you will, a Hong Kong movie without so much as a single neon sign in view; it's a film seen in shadows.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Movie: "Farewell My Concubine" The Setup: Set against a background of political changes in China from the 1920s through the 1970s, the film focuses on two boys in training to become stars of the Peking Opera: Dieyi (Leslie Cheung, pictured), who plays female characters in the all-male opera, and Xiaolou (Zhang Fengyi), who does the macho parts. The Costume Designer: Chen Changmin, a Beijing art teacher, making her movie-design debut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Leslie Cheung, a pop singer and actor who starred in the Oscar-nominated 1993 film "Farewell My Concubine," died Tuesday after leaping from a hotel in Hong Kong. He was 46. The star plunged from the 24th floor of the five-star Mandarin Oriental hotel in Hong Kong's central business district, said hotel spokeswoman Sally De Souza. Police said they found a note on Cheung's body in which he stated he was plagued by emotional problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1997 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times staff writer
Leslie Cheung, the Hong Kong superstar and pop singer, has never been busier. He has a new film, Chen Kaige's exquisite "Temptress Moon." He is in the midst of a worldwide singing tour marking his return to the concert stage after a seven-year hiatus. And he is reaping building international acclaim for his remarkable acting talent, which spans classic screwball comedy to martial arts fantasies to the epic tragedy of Chen's 1993 "Farewell My Concubine."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1993
I would agree with Dacy up to a point, that it's the star performances that make Hong Kong films popular. But who creates many of those star performances? Until he was cast in a John Woo film, Chow Yun-Fat's "undeniable personal charisma" didn't find much of an audience. Woo's ability to bring out the best in actors and to give them a previously unimaginable weight and depth has in the past revived the failing career of Ti Lung, made a serious actor of pop star Leslie Cheung and made Chow Yun-Fat a mega-star in Asia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Farewell My Concubine" is a slow boat through China, and why shouldn't it be? An unhurried journey on the great tide of modern Chinese history, this gorgeous, intoxicating epic is confident enough of its visual and narrative power not to rush the telling. Old-fashioned in form but modern in psychological dynamic, it's a film that you can lose yourself in, that washes over you like a warm and enveloping mist.
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