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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Hand Behind the Mouse: The Ub Iwerks Story," a documentary by the artist's granddaughter, Leslie Iwerks, which opens today at the El Capitan Theater for a one-week run, offers viewers a rare look at one of the unsung giants of animation and film technology. Born in 1901, Iwerks was still a teenager in Kansas City when he met another ambitious young artist, Walt Disney. The two friends taught themselves animation at night, while working as commercial artists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If you're a documentarian, you know that while it's a great honor to make the academy's shortlist for best documentary short, it's almost impossible to get anyone in the media to write about your movie, since they're almost totally obsessed with handicapping the ups and downs of the various actor and best picture races. But thanks to the Canadian government, in particular Alberta's minister of culture, Leslie Iwerks' documentary short "Downstream" has a shot at a little notoriety, which is just what a doc-short needs to steal a little attention from the endless speculation about Kate Winslet's Oscar chances.
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MAGAZINE
May 12, 2002 | BARBARA TANNENBAUM
On a wind-swept morning, Leslie Iwerks drives her white Jeep Cherokee down San Fernando Road on the outskirts of Burbank. She navigates surface streets for a 10-minute trip between Iwerks Entertainment and the Walt Disney Studios. By L.A. standards, it is a commute barely worth mentioning. For Iwerks, the four-mile journey symbolizes a lifetime of work. Make that two lifetimes. Her grandfather occupies an obscure niche in pop culture history, a position that Iwerks has long wanted to change.
MAGAZINE
May 12, 2002 | BARBARA TANNENBAUM
On a wind-swept morning, Leslie Iwerks drives her white Jeep Cherokee down San Fernando Road on the outskirts of Burbank. She navigates surface streets for a 10-minute trip between Iwerks Entertainment and the Walt Disney Studios. By L.A. standards, it is a commute barely worth mentioning. For Iwerks, the four-mile journey symbolizes a lifetime of work. Make that two lifetimes. Her grandfather occupies an obscure niche in pop culture history, a position that Iwerks has long wanted to change.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If you're a documentarian, you know that while it's a great honor to make the academy's shortlist for best documentary short, it's almost impossible to get anyone in the media to write about your movie, since they're almost totally obsessed with handicapping the ups and downs of the various actor and best picture races. But thanks to the Canadian government, in particular Alberta's minister of culture, Leslie Iwerks' documentary short "Downstream" has a shot at a little notoriety, which is just what a doc-short needs to steal a little attention from the endless speculation about Kate Winslet's Oscar chances.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2007 | Susan King
There probably won't be any snakes in the theater, but Samuel L. Jackson (pictured) is scheduled to show up tonight at the Aero in Santa Monica for a double bill of his recent films, "Resurrecting the Champ" and "Black Snake Moan." And sticking with the celebrity-appearance theme, Christian Bale will be on hand Saturday for a quartet of his own films: "American Psycho," "Batman Returns," "I'm Not There" and "3:10 to Yuma." . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1999
Three special programs will salute three important but lesser-known animation figures this month. * On Friday, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art will present "A Taste of Tashlin: Early Hollywood Cartoons." Although Frank Tashlin is known for directing such live-action comedies as "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?," he began his career in animation. He worked at Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
The art of perseverance, manifesting itself in a variety of ways, is the dominant theme among the four "Academy Award Nominated Documentary Shorts." Although screening too late to help you win the Oscar pool, you have a chance to see if you agree with the academy's vote. Leading off is this year's Oscar winner, Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon's "The Blood of Yingzhou District." It's a heartbreaking portrayal of the situation facing children in rural China who have been orphaned by AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2007
Foreign language film "After the Wedding" Denmark "Days of Glory" ("Indigenes") Algeria "The Lives of Others" Germany "Pan's Labyrinth" Mexico "Water" Canada * Animated feature "Cars" (Disney/Pixar) John Lasseter, director "Happy Feet" (Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2007
BEST PICTURE "Babel" "The Departed" "Letters From Iwo Jima" "Little Miss Sunshine" "The Queen" ----- DIRECTOR Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, "Babel" Martin Scorsese, "The Departed" Clint Eastwood, "Letters From Iwo Jima" Stephen Frears, "The Queen" Paul Greengrass, "United 93" ----- ACTOR Leonardo DiCaprio, "Blood Diamond" Ryan Gosling, "Half Nelson" Peter O'Toole, "Venus" Will Smith, "The Pursuit of Happyness" Forest Whitaker, "The Last King of Scotland" ----- ACTRESS Penelope Cruz, "Volver"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Hand Behind the Mouse: The Ub Iwerks Story," a documentary by the artist's granddaughter, Leslie Iwerks, which opens today at the El Capitan Theater for a one-week run, offers viewers a rare look at one of the unsung giants of animation and film technology. Born in 1901, Iwerks was still a teenager in Kansas City when he met another ambitious young artist, Walt Disney. The two friends taught themselves animation at night, while working as commercial artists.
NEWS
February 21, 2007
BEST MOVIE "Babel" "The Departed" "Letters From Iwo Jima" "Little Miss Sunshine" "The Queen" THE BUZZ: This one's a classic Oscar cliffhanger. Most pundits say it's Abby versus Goliath (oops, "Little Miss Sunshine" versus "The Departed"), but "Babel" or "Letters From Iwo Jima" (Ken Watanabe, above) could upset because they have the Big Message. "The Queen" abdicates.
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