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Leslie Marmon Silko

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February 2, 1992 | Paul West, West's most recent novels are "Lord Byron's Doctor" and "The Women of Whitechapel and Jack the Ripper."
The longer my own novels get, the more I sympathize with novelists writing blockbusters, and I do so because the massive novel models itself not on the vast universe, our huge planet, our big continents, but on the grandiose behavior of the Creator of all things. There is surely something godlike in concocting "Remembrance of Things Past" or "Finnegans Wake" that you might feel in only a minor way if concocting "Death in Venice" or "Candide." E. M.
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January 9, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Turquoise Ledge Leslie Marmon Silko Viking: 319 pp., $25.95 Leslie Marmon Silko writes in the language of the spirit ? reading her words as she constructs a portrait of herself for this memoir is not only like being inside her head, it is like eavesdropping on her silent conversations with her gods. Silko was born in 1948 in Albuquerque and grew up on the edge of the Laguna Pueblo reservation in north central New Mexico. She is part Laguna Pueblo, part Cherokee, part Mexican and part Anglo.
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BOOKS
January 25, 1987 | Quannah Karvar, Karvar is a translator of Ponca and Lakota oral history and mythology
"My great-grandmother told my mother: Never forget you are Indian. And my mother told me the same thing. This, then, is how I have gone about remembering, so that my children will remember too."
BOOKS
February 2, 1992 | Paul West, West's most recent novels are "Lord Byron's Doctor" and "The Women of Whitechapel and Jack the Ripper."
The longer my own novels get, the more I sympathize with novelists writing blockbusters, and I do so because the massive novel models itself not on the vast universe, our huge planet, our big continents, but on the grandiose behavior of the Creator of all things. There is surely something godlike in concocting "Remembrance of Things Past" or "Finnegans Wake" that you might feel in only a minor way if concocting "Death in Venice" or "Candide." E. M.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leslie Marmon Silko was 8 years old in 1955 when her tribe prepared to file a land claim against the United States government for stealing 50,000 acres of the Laguna Indians' land in New Mexico. Her father was the tribal treasurer. The Marmon household on the Laguna reservation was filled with the tangled evidence for the case--legal papers, archeological charts and the advice of the elders. The tribe eventually prevailed in the U. S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Turquoise Ledge Leslie Marmon Silko Viking: 319 pp., $25.95 Leslie Marmon Silko writes in the language of the spirit ? reading her words as she constructs a portrait of herself for this memoir is not only like being inside her head, it is like eavesdropping on her silent conversations with her gods. Silko was born in 1948 in Albuquerque and grew up on the edge of the Laguna Pueblo reservation in north central New Mexico. She is part Laguna Pueblo, part Cherokee, part Mexican and part Anglo.
BOOKS
March 17, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
YELLOW WOMAN AND A BEAUTY OF THE SPIRIT: Essays on Native American Life Today by Leslie Marmon Silko. (Simon & Schuster: $23; 205 pp.) The two main messages in this collection of essays from the author of "Almanac of the Dead" are that the Pueblo (Silko's own) people are inseparable from the land and that Silko's language springs organically from the land and pictures she has taken of that land.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2010
JAZZ Billy Cobham Born in Panama, raised in New York and a resident of Switzerland for more than a quarter-century, the drummer and his inspirations are nothing if not worldly. Cobham, a founding member of the Mahavishnu Orchestra in the early 1970s, takes his jazzy ? and jazz fusion-y ? stylings to the stage of the Catalina Bar & Grill for a four-night engagement at the historic Hollywood jazz club. Catalina Bar & Grill. 6725 W. Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. 10 p.m. $20. www.catalinajazzclub.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer William Morrow: 348 pp., $25.99 William Kamkwamba grew up in Malawi, the son of a maize and tobacco farmer. Their house had no electricity or plumbing. In William's village, high costs and frequent power outages made electricity hardly worth the effort. In 2002, flooding, famine and the high costs of fertilizer forced William's family to take him out of school -- they could no longer afford the annual tuition of $80. William discovered the local library.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | BOB SIPCHEN
Bill Miller, a Native American country/western singer was reaching out to shake the hand of Dee Brown, author of "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee," when gunshots rang out. Without warning, a U.S. Cavalry troop in full regalia marched into the crowded Western Writers of America autograph party, banging drums, blowing bugles and firing Winchester rifles into the air. "This means war," the long-haired Indian shouted over the ruckus.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leslie Marmon Silko was 8 years old in 1955 when her tribe prepared to file a land claim against the United States government for stealing 50,000 acres of the Laguna Indians' land in New Mexico. Her father was the tribal treasurer. The Marmon household on the Laguna reservation was filled with the tangled evidence for the case--legal papers, archeological charts and the advice of the elders. The tribe eventually prevailed in the U. S.
BOOKS
January 25, 1987 | Quannah Karvar, Karvar is a translator of Ponca and Lakota oral history and mythology
"My great-grandmother told my mother: Never forget you are Indian. And my mother told me the same thing. This, then, is how I have gone about remembering, so that my children will remember too."
BOOKS
July 9, 1989 | Quannah Karvar, Karvar is a translator of Ponca oral history and mythology. and
"Spider Woman's Granddaughters," a companion in spirit to Paula Gunn Allen's "The Sacred Hoop: Recovering the Feminine in American Indian Tradition," published in 1986, continues to explore the history and spiritual heritage of Native American women.
BOOKS
December 5, 1993 | Michael Silverblatt, Michael Silverblatt is the producer and host of KCRW's "Bookworm" (Mondays at 2 p.m.) and moderates the Lannan Foundation's "Readings and Conversations" series. He would also like to recommend Mikhail Bulgakov's "The Master and Margarita."
Bookgiving is like kissing--a happy, natural impulse at holiday time. And yet, the true booklover knows how risky and difficult choosing a book to give can be. All love, after all, involves a sweet agony. Book love is no exception. For example: Do we give books that we secretly want ourselves?
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