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Leslie S Klinger

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
The greatest detective in the world has, for more than a century, been under the protection of Arthur Conan Doyle and that author's heirs. But one scholar believes it's time for Sherlock Holmes to be set free. Long a fixture of the popular imagination, the time may have come for him to belong to the public as well. Author and attorney Leslie S. Klinger, widely regarded as one of the foremost authorities on Sherlock Holmes, has filed suit in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of Illinois against the Conan Doyle estate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
The greatest detective in the world has, for more than a century, been under the protection of Arthur Conan Doyle and that author's heirs. But one scholar believes it's time for Sherlock Holmes to be set free. Long a fixture of the popular imagination, the time may have come for him to belong to the public as well. Author and attorney Leslie S. Klinger, widely regarded as one of the foremost authorities on Sherlock Holmes, has filed suit in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of Illinois against the Conan Doyle estate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2012
Panel: Go the F— to Sleep When: April 21, noon Where: Taper Hall on the USC campus Who: Panelists Ricardo Cortes and Adam Mansbach ------------------------------- Panel: Graphic Novel, Mythic Stories When: April 21, 3:30 p.m. Where: Salvatori Computer Science Center on USC campus Who: Panelists Ed Brubacker, Adam Mansbach and Douglas McGowan; moderated by Leslie S. Klinger Information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks/ ...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
A federal judge has ruled that Sherlock Holmes and his sidekick, Dr. John H. Watson, are no longer protected by copyright, and that all elements of the famous sleuth's stories created by the late Sir Arthur Conan Doyle before 1923 are now in the public domain. The court case required U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo to become something of a Sherlock Holmes expert, and in a 22-page ruling issued last week in Chicago, he began by summarizing the four novels and 56 short stories Conan Doyle wrote about the fictional detective: The character first appeared in 1887.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to fears that a new newspaper tax could force many small publications in California to fold, the State Board of Equalization found a legal escape hatch Tuesday that could spare most free-circulation newspapers from the additional financial burden. Chairman Brad Sherman, acknowledging that the solution was not the ideal way to administer tax law, suggested that the board make free newspapers eligible for the same tax exemption that now applies to junk mail.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011
Words & Ideas Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. SUNDAY Sam Brower : The author of "Prophet's Prey: My Seven-Year Investigation into Warren Jeffs and the Fundamentalist Church of Latter-Day Saints" will discuss and sign his new book. Center for Inquiry, 4773 Hollywood Blvd., L.A. 11 a.m. $8. (323) 666-9797. Ace Frehley : The KISS guitarist will present and sign his new memoir, "No Regrets. " Book Soup, 8818 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. 4 p.m. Free.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2004 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
The first thing you notice are the artifacts. Nearly every inch of wall space is covered with movie posters: "The Seven-Per-Cent Solution," "Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother," "The Hound of the Baskervilles." On the desk is a magnifying glass with a horn handle; behind it, a small, exaggerated figurine of Sherlock Holmes. A bookcase holds a concise but well-selected library of Sherlockiana, with collections of the stories, annotations, critical works.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2008 | Leslie S. Klinger, Special to The Times
Mystery AND detection have been popular stage themes since "Oedipus Rex." Hamlet, for instance, took several acts to figure out who murdered his father. In the 19th century, melodramas that featured criminals, crime and the forces of justice flourished in England and America, often based on real cases. In 1863, Tom Taylor's "The Ticket-of -Leave Man" (featuring Hawkshaw the detective) was extremely successful in both countries, followed by adaptations of works of Dickens and Wilkie Collins.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Arthur Conan Doyle famously tired of Sherlock Holmes and repeatedly tried to end the series of stories featuring the detective he dismissively called "my most notorious character." On each occasion, though, an intense popular clamor -- and the opportunity it afforded to shore up the author's shaky finances -- coaxed Conan Doyle into an additional sequence of stories. Holmes' adventures total four novels and 56 short stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
YOU don't have to know the history of detective fiction to enjoy Australian writer Michael Robotham's vibrant and utterly contemporary new mystery, "The Night Ferry," which is how it should be. On the other hand, Robotham is a writer who plays so knowingly and enthusiastically with the genre's conventions that a bit of appreciation for his bravura display of craft definitely enhances the experience of this third in what can only be called a "semi-series" of novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2005 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
NOT long ago, I visited the Andre Kertesz retrospective at LACMA, which spans six decades in the photographer's life. What's remarkable about Kertesz is not just his longevity, but the way that, throughout his career, his aesthetics continued to develop and change. There's an enormous difference between his early work -- images of Hungary in the 1920s -- and his final photos, taken in New York in the 1980s.
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