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November 18, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Two former Cabinet ministers in the Lesotho government and their wives were abducted from a weekend dinner party and murdered, the kingdom's police commissioner said Monday. Vincent Makhele, Lesotho's foreign minister until a military coup last January, and Desmond Sixishe, the former information minister, were taken to remote Bushman's Pass in Lesotho's Maluti Mountains and killed late Saturday, according to Maj. Gen. James Dingizwayo, the national police commissioner.
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NEWS
January 24, 1995
Lesotho's King Moshoeshoe II, deposed four years ago by the military leaders of the tiny African country, will be restored to his throne Wednesday after the abdication of his son, Letsie III. Reinstating one of Africa's three sovereign kings is expected to bring stability to the country of 1.8 million people, entirely landlocked by South Africa, after years of military-dominated politics.
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NEWS
February 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lesotho's military ruler, Maj. Gen. Justin Metsing Lekhanya, appeared to be in full control of the small southern African nation after a day of upheaval and confusion. Information Minister Vincent Malebo told a news conference in Maseru that Lekhanya will soon announce some government changes, but he gave no details. Earlier, the offices of the ruling six-member Military Council, headed by Lekhanya, were ringed by heavily armed troops and armored vehicles for about an hour.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
King Moshoeshoe II, stripped of authority over his tiny mountain kingdom, left for temporary exile in Britain on Saturday after refusing to endorse the actions of Lesotho's military ruler in a recent power struggle. Maj. Gen. Justin Lekhanya said in a radio broadcast that he had asked Moshoeshoe, 51, to take "a brief sabbatical in the United Kingdom, which would allow ample opportunity for reflection."
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
King Moshoeshoe II, stripped of authority over his tiny mountain kingdom, left for temporary exile in Britain on Saturday after refusing to endorse the actions of Lesotho's military ruler in a recent power struggle. Maj. Gen. Justin Lekhanya said in a radio broadcast that he had asked Moshoeshoe, 51, to take "a brief sabbatical in the United Kingdom, which would allow ample opportunity for reflection."
NEWS
January 24, 1995
Lesotho's King Moshoeshoe II, deposed four years ago by the military leaders of the tiny African country, will be restored to his throne Wednesday after the abdication of his son, Letsie III. Reinstating one of Africa's three sovereign kings is expected to bring stability to the country of 1.8 million people, entirely landlocked by South Africa, after years of military-dominated politics.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Soldiers from South Africa and Botswana moved to quell an outbreak of looting after suppressing mutinous Lesotho troops in this mountainous kingdom. The South African and Botswanan troops sparked riots after intervening Tuesday to thwart a mutiny by Lesotho troops. Lesotho's government requested the intervention two weeks ago amid a revolt by junior Lesotho military officers and strikes that paralyzed the capital, Maseru.
NEWS
December 20, 1985 | Associated Press
State-controlled Lesotho radio said South African commandos using silencer-fitted guns raided two homes in Maseru early today and killed nine people, some of them South African political refugees. The South African military denied that it raided this tiny, independent, black-ruled kingdom, which is ringed entirely by South Africa. "We categorically deny these allegations. We were not involved," army spokesman Commandant John Rolt said in Pretoria.
NEWS
December 21, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Nine South African political refugees, most of them members of the outlawed African National Congress, were shot to death early Friday in Maseru, the capital of Lesotho. The government of Lesotho said the killers were South African army commandos, but South Africa denied it. Seven blacks--four women and three men--were killed at a party about 1 a.m.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Security forces in armored cars blocked off government offices in this capital of the small kingdom of Lesotho for a few hours Wednesday, but the reason for the move remained a mystery as the day ended. The government of Chief Leabua Jonathan, Lesotho's prime minister for the last 20 years, said a bomb scare forced the evacuation of its main offices shortly before lunch, though a three-hour search turned up no bomb.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lesotho's military ruler, Maj. Gen. Justin Metsing Lekhanya, appeared to be in full control of the small southern African nation after a day of upheaval and confusion. Information Minister Vincent Malebo told a news conference in Maseru that Lekhanya will soon announce some government changes, but he gave no details. Earlier, the offices of the ruling six-member Military Council, headed by Lekhanya, were ringed by heavily armed troops and armored vehicles for about an hour.
NEWS
November 18, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Two former Cabinet ministers in the Lesotho government and their wives were abducted from a weekend dinner party and murdered, the kingdom's police commissioner said Monday. Vincent Makhele, Lesotho's foreign minister until a military coup last January, and Desmond Sixishe, the former information minister, were taken to remote Bushman's Pass in Lesotho's Maluti Mountains and killed late Saturday, according to Maj. Gen. James Dingizwayo, the national police commissioner.
NEWS
December 28, 1985 | United Press International
South Africa on Friday admitted staging a raid on a black homeland near the Swaziland border in search of black nationalist guerrillas but denied that its forces had entered Swaziland. The Royal Swaziland police said a number of South African soldiers entered the tiny kingdom Christmas Eve near the southern Luvumisa border post and threatened to attack villagers if they sheltered guerrillas. An army spokesman in Pretoria firmly denied the report.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a contentious milestone for democratic South Africa, the government of President Nelson Mandela deployed hundreds of troops Tuesday to the neighboring mountain kingdom of Lesotho in a bid to bring calm to the troubled nation. But to Pretoria's surprise, the country's first significant foreign military engagement since Mandela became president four years ago ignited fierce gunfights between South African and Lesotho troops and unleashed a torrent of anti-South African sentiment.
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