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Lester Maddox

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2003 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Lester Maddox, the flamboyant and controversial restaurant owner who in the 1960s parlayed a staunch segregationist stance into the governorship of Georgia, died Wednesday in Atlanta. He was 87. Maddox had been battling a number of ailments, including cancer, complications from a stroke and heart attacks. He recently broke two ribs in a fall and contracted pneumonia. He had been under hospice care for a few weeks.
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OPINION
July 6, 2003 | Steve Oney, Former Georgian Steve Oney's book on a notorious Southern lynching, "And the Dead Shall Rise," will be published in October by Pantheon.
The last time I saw Lester Maddox was in 1978. He was on his hands and knees behind the counter of his gift shop in downtown Atlanta, using dishrags and towels to mop up 50 or so gallons of melted ice cream. As a journalist, I could not help but be transfixed by the sight of the former governor of Georgia reduced to such an ignominious task. Six months earlier, Maddox had suffered a near-fatal heart attack. During his convalescence, electricity had been shut off at his establishment.
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BOOKS
December 22, 1991
I am a great fan of your section, but I must admit to being confused by Patrick Goldstein's article, "Steal Magnolias" (Nov. 24). Goldstein writes that the parallels between media events of today and those of the South in the 1950s are "striking," details how George Wallace and Nicholas Katzenbach staged a media event and suggests that Southern politicians inspired Roger Ailes. But then he praises the same period and place for its genuineness and spontaneity and bemoans today's politicians for "contriving" images.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2003 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Lester Maddox, the flamboyant and controversial restaurant owner who in the 1960s parlayed a staunch segregationist stance into the governorship of Georgia, died Wednesday in Atlanta. He was 87. Maddox had been battling a number of ailments, including cancer, complications from a stroke and heart attacks. He recently broke two ribs in a fall and contracted pneumonia. He had been under hospice care for a few weeks.
OPINION
July 6, 2003 | Steve Oney, Former Georgian Steve Oney's book on a notorious Southern lynching, "And the Dead Shall Rise," will be published in October by Pantheon.
The last time I saw Lester Maddox was in 1978. He was on his hands and knees behind the counter of his gift shop in downtown Atlanta, using dishrags and towels to mop up 50 or so gallons of melted ice cream. As a journalist, I could not help but be transfixed by the sight of the former governor of Georgia reduced to such an ignominious task. Six months earlier, Maddox had suffered a near-fatal heart attack. During his convalescence, electricity had been shut off at his establishment.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were no introductions at first when the frail old man joined the line of local dignitaries warbling "God Bless America" onstage at the Cobb County Amphitheater as Patrick J. Buchanan took his presidential campaign to Georgia.
NEWS
September 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Gov. Lester Maddox, one of the Old South's last segregationist governors, said in Atlanta that he is "fighting a losing battle" with prostate cancer. Maddox, 85, was diagnosed with cancer in 1983. Maddox told Associated Press that he is undergoing daily chemotherapy treatments and finds it difficult to get out of bed. Maddox gained notoriety after chasing blacks from his Atlanta chicken restaurant in the 1960s.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | DAN SEWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Early afternoon at the Varsity, and the seven-decade-old joint is jumpin'. Sharply dressed professionals, black and white, ease their sporty luxury cars in alongside the pickup trucks carrying country folks into the urban perimeter.
NEWS
March 4, 1988
Philip Henry Alston Jr., 76, a confidant of former President Jimmy Carter and former ambassador to Australia. An influential Atlanta lawyer, Alston raised millions of dollars for the University of Georgia and began supporting Carter after meeting him in 1966. Carter lost the governor's race that year to Lester Maddox, but Alston was chairman of Carter's successful gubernatorial bid in 1970. He was chairman of the Committee for Jimmy Carter when Carter was elected President in 1976.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | Associated Press
Ex-Gov. Lester G. Maddox was moved out of the intensive care unit Wednesday at Emory University Hospital, where he underwent heart bypass surgery. Maddox, 75, was admitted to the hospital Sunday.
NEWS
September 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Gov. Lester Maddox, one of the Old South's last segregationist governors, said in Atlanta that he is "fighting a losing battle" with prostate cancer. Maddox, 85, was diagnosed with cancer in 1983. Maddox told Associated Press that he is undergoing daily chemotherapy treatments and finds it difficult to get out of bed. Maddox gained notoriety after chasing blacks from his Atlanta chicken restaurant in the 1960s.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | DAN SEWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Early afternoon at the Varsity, and the seven-decade-old joint is jumpin'. Sharply dressed professionals, black and white, ease their sporty luxury cars in alongside the pickup trucks carrying country folks into the urban perimeter.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were no introductions at first when the frail old man joined the line of local dignitaries warbling "God Bless America" onstage at the Cobb County Amphitheater as Patrick J. Buchanan took his presidential campaign to Georgia.
BOOKS
December 22, 1991
I am a great fan of your section, but I must admit to being confused by Patrick Goldstein's article, "Steal Magnolias" (Nov. 24). Goldstein writes that the parallels between media events of today and those of the South in the 1950s are "striking," details how George Wallace and Nicholas Katzenbach staged a media event and suggests that Southern politicians inspired Roger Ailes. But then he praises the same period and place for its genuineness and spontaneity and bemoans today's politicians for "contriving" images.
NEWS
September 5, 1992
Charles Longstreet Weltner, 64, the only Deep South congressman to vote for the 1965 Voting Rights Act. In 1966, he gave up his seat in Congress after two terms rather than sign a Democratic Party loyalty oath that would have required him to support segregationist Lester Maddox in that year's gubernatorial campaign. Weltner took part in lawsuits that in 1962 overturned a Georgia primary system that diminished blacks' voting power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992
The long-dormant American Independent Party (AIP) has suddenly come to life. AIP voter registrations are increasing. The reason is simple. People wrongly assume that Ross Perot would be the representative for this party. But Perot was running as an independent. The American Independent Party is the old state's rights, segregationist party founded by George Wallace in the 1960s and has been essentially inactive for over a decade. Those who registered AIP to help Perot would probably be appalled to find they have joined the party of segregationist Wallace and Lester Maddox.
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