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Lethal Weapon

ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2002 | TERESA WILTZ, WASHINGTON POST
There's no entourage nipping at his heels, no burly bodyguard, just a regular Joe strolling the street--except that, of course, he isn't, but it's easy to forget that. Which means that the homeless dudes in Dupont Circle feel free to hit him up with their requests: This one could use an autograph. That one could use a little cash. The one with the pants sliding south could use his San Francisco Giants baseball cap. Perhaps deferring to the royal burnish of celebrity, they're unfailingly polite.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Guess what? Men and women are at war. The battle is ongoing, and the most lethal weapon in the field is raw sex, and plenty of it. Antonio Serrano's "Sex, Sweat and Tears," presented by Grupo de Teatro Sinergia at the Frida Kahlo Theater, makes that point early on and bludgeons it home for the next 21/2 hours. By all accounts, Serrano's muddled farce was a huge commercial hit in Mexico and later inspired a film.
SPORTS
January 23, 2000 | BOB BAUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
He has a jump shot to die for and a name that begs for a bad pun. Eddie House has been, well, a House on fire for Arizona State. The senior guard with "Lethal Weapon" tattooed on his left arm has overcome two coaching changes and some off-court stumbles to emerge as one of the most dynamic players in college basketball. "Anybody who won't come see Eddie House play, they don't like basketball," Sun Devils coach Rob Evans said.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | Your Wheels JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Why are so many drivers turning neighborhood streets into speedways? Federal statistics show that most pedestrian fatalities in the U.S. occur on the very streets where we live and play--rather than main thoroughfares or freeways. Call it aggressive driving or just plain speeding, but people are dying because drivers are rocketing through once-peaceful communities. Of the 5,449 pedestrians killed in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
Not since L'Affaire Simpson had I seen an overflow crowd in a civil courtroom. Wedged in the pews of Department 14 in downtown Los Angeles, they sat shoulder to shoulder, or maybe shoulder holster to shoulder holster, for a hearing in their complaint against the Los Angeles Police Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Mask of Zorro's" lethal weapon was only a sword, but it was enough for the old-fashioned adventure to carve a "Z" in first place at the box office over the weekend, with an estimated $22.7 million in tickets sales, extremely good for a movie without a superstar name attached.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS
Showing remarkable box-office strength for a franchise that many thought was past its prime, the Warner Bros. action film "Lethal Weapon 4," starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover, roared to life with $34 million in ticket sales on its opening weekend. "'Lethal Weapon 4' is doing amazingly well for a fourth installment," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of the box-office tracking firm Exhibitor Relations Co.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Warner Bros.' "Lethal Weapon 4" got off to a strong start, but even if it matches the domestic gross of sequels 2 and 3 (around $140 million) and soars overseas (more than $150 million), the film may only squeak into the profit zone. The film cost between $120 million and $150 million and worldwide marketing and distribution add $50 million more.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a guns 'n' ammo weekend at the box office, with "Lethal Weapon 4" and "Small Soldiers" sandwiching "Armageddon" and blasting about $70 million in business among them. Who says action isn't hot this summer? The "Lethal Weapon 4" fan base did not disappoint. Warner Bros. is reporting an estimated $34.4 million in 3,117 theaters. That's the most lethal of these weapons yet, beating out No. 3's $33.2 million back in 1992 (though it only opened in about 2,500 theaters).
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