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Leticia Quezada

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January 28, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leticia Quezada is reliving her immigrant experience: She is 13 and in the eighth grade. A former straight-A student in Juarez, Mexico, she is getting F's at a new school in Pittsburg, Calif. Determined to make sense of the foreign language filling her ears, she drills herself to the point of exhaustion every night, sleeps with a dictionary under her pillow and attends classes religiously.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | AMY PYLE
Leticia Quezada, who became the first Latina on the Los Angeles Unified School Board in 1987, announced Wednesday that she will not seek a third term in April. Quezada, whose district includes heavily Latino neighborhoods on the Eastside and in the northeast San Fernando Valley, said it was time to move on after a decade of public service. "I've always believed in term limits and I've been on the school board for eight years," Quezada said. "It's not an easy decision . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1992 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Friday, the same day she began officially representing the northeastern portion of the San Fernando Valley, Los Angeles school board President Leticia Quezada met with angry Valley PTSA leaders in a fence-mending session she billed as "a call for unity." But the parents saw it differently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Leticia Quezada, who became the first Latina on the Los Angeles Unified School board in 1987, announced Wednesday that she will not seek reelection to a third term in April. Quezada, whose district includes heavily Latino neighborhoods in East Los Angeles and the northeast San Fernando Valley, said she felt that it was time to move on after a decade of public service. "I've always believed in term limits and I've been on the school board for eight years," Quezada said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1992 | HENRY CHU
Nearly two months after a redistricting battle pitted her against many San Fernando Valley organizations, Los Angeles school board President Leticia Quezada is scheduled to address a major Valley business coalition today to discuss the recent remapping and its implications. The board of directors of the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn., an organization representing more than 300 corporations and businesses, will hear from Quezada during a lunch in Universal City.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1992
Leticia Quezada's attempt to distance herself from the Los Angeles School Board on the $250,000 public relations expenditure issue is understandable, since she is running for Congress (letter, May 22). But The Times' May 16 editorial dealt with the bigger picture, which she fails to acknowledge, and that is the failure of many elected officials, including the Los Angeles School Board, to act responsibly, now and in the past. If she cares about those of us who elect persons to deal with the school crisis, she should stop advocating non-citizens and illegal aliens' right to vote in certain elections.
OPINION
March 21, 1993
In response to "L.A. Schools OK Historic Reforms," March 16: The Los Angeles Board of Education has done it again. It's no surprise. With typical stealth tactics Leticia Quezada railroaded her proposal to oppose Sen. David Roberti's legislation (SB 290) to create smaller, local school districts through the board. The outcome of the vote was as expected. Only Roberta Weintraub and Julie Korenstein support the efforts of parents, teachers, business and community leaders to improve our children's educations by bringing control of our schools back to the community (thus dismantling the LAUSD and its board)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1989
Cuts in a computer literacy program, "combat pay" for inner-city administrators and staff cars were approved Wednesday by the Los Angeles Board of Education, which faces at least $44 million in budget reductions in order to pay for employee raises. The board voted to reduce by 50% the district's share of a computer literacy program, which saves $404,000 next year. It also agreed to take away district-paid cars from 41 administrators, including division heads and assistant and associate superintendents, which had cost $124,701.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1992
Re "L.A. District to Propose 14% Pay Cut For Teachers" (July 25): That state funding is inadequate to meet the current needs of L.A. Unified cannot be denied. That significant "unrestricted" federal-dollar input is needed also cannot be denied. Nevertheless and once again, the omnipotent L.A. Board of Education and district administrative hierarchy conclude that equity in the face of crisis means that teachers must financially subsidize the district; in point of fact, not a new tactic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1992 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the 26th anniversary of her arrival in the United States, Leticia Quezada on Monday was elected president of the Los Angeles Board of Education, becoming the first Latina to hold that post. Elected on a 6 to 1 vote, Quezada will succeed Warren Furutani, who presided over the board during the 1991-92 school year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first step toward creating a large complex of schools in one of the Los Angeles Unified School District's most crowded areas, the Board of Education on Monday approved an ambitious project aimed at providing 16,500 students with courses linked to their career interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first step toward creating a large complex of schools in one of the Los Angeles Unified School District's most crowded areas, the Board of Education on Monday approved an ambitious project aimed at providing 16,500 students with courses linked to their career interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles school board member Julie Korenstein failed Thursday to get the board to commit itself to scrapping the year-round classroom calendar in favor of a return to the traditional September-to-June school year. Korenstein, who represents much of the San Fernando Valley, won only a promise to consider such a move along with other options.
OPINION
March 21, 1993
In response to "L.A. Schools OK Historic Reforms," March 16: The Los Angeles Board of Education has done it again. It's no surprise. With typical stealth tactics Leticia Quezada railroaded her proposal to oppose Sen. David Roberti's legislation (SB 290) to create smaller, local school districts through the board. The outcome of the vote was as expected. Only Roberta Weintraub and Julie Korenstein support the efforts of parents, teachers, business and community leaders to improve our children's educations by bringing control of our schools back to the community (thus dismantling the LAUSD and its board)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ and SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
A s the Los Angeles Unified School District teeters on the edge of a potentially crippling teachers strike, the two top leaders presiding over the increasingly intense negotiations met at The Times on Thursday to discuss the talks in the troubled school district. School board President Leticia Quezada has served on the board through grueling financial decisions in which an unprecedented $400 million was cut to balance the district's $3.9-billion budget this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Unified School District board President Leticia Quezada assured Valley business leaders Tuesday that she hopes to set aside differences and work with them to solve problems facing education. Quezada was addressing the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn., which strongly opposed the recent remapping of school districts that resulted in the extension of Quezada's district into the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | AMY PYLE
Leticia Quezada, who became the first Latina on the Los Angeles Unified School Board in 1987, announced Wednesday that she will not seek a third term in April. Quezada, whose district includes heavily Latino neighborhoods on the Eastside and in the northeast San Fernando Valley, said it was time to move on after a decade of public service. "I've always believed in term limits and I've been on the school board for eight years," Quezada said. "It's not an easy decision . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1989
I was very disturbed in reading the arguments used by opponents of district elections in Larry Gordon's piece on the Los Angeles Community College District (Metro, Aug. 31) and legislation authored by Assemblyman Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles). Opponents stress that at-large elections have brought minorities to the Board of Trustees. As a former trustee, I want to bring some historical perspective to this assertion. Only one Latino served on the board before me and only one has succeeded me to that office in its 20 years of existence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1992 | HENRY CHU
Nearly two months after a redistricting battle pitted her against many San Fernando Valley organizations, Los Angeles school board President Leticia Quezada is scheduled to address a major Valley business coalition today to discuss the recent remapping and its implications. The board of directors of the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn., an organization representing more than 300 corporations and businesses, will hear from Quezada during a lunch in Universal City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1992
Re "L.A. District to Propose 14% Pay Cut For Teachers" (July 25): That state funding is inadequate to meet the current needs of L.A. Unified cannot be denied. That significant "unrestricted" federal-dollar input is needed also cannot be denied. Nevertheless and once again, the omnipotent L.A. Board of Education and district administrative hierarchy conclude that equity in the face of crisis means that teachers must financially subsidize the district; in point of fact, not a new tactic.
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