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OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "France is having a midweek crisis," Column One, Nov. 6 The controversy over French children having to attend class on Wednesdays brought to mind a quote by a friend - a teacher - who once said, "The mind can only absorb what punishment that the fanny can take. " Too many hours during a single sitting do not necessarily translate to productivity. Rich Flynn Huntington Beach ALSO: Letters: Justice poorly served Letters: Legalizing street vendors Letters: Prayer and the Supreme Court
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OPINION
June 30, 2012
Because of the scarce print space allocated among the 60 to 70 letters to the editor that run each week, submissions replying to other letters are only occasionally published on the regular pages. When an unusually high volume of "letters on letters" are sent to letters@lames.com , a selection will run in this space. This week, more than three dozen readers weighed in on other letters, most of them responding to discussions on freedom of religion vis a vis the Obama administration's rule on mandatory contraception coverage, and on Israeli President Shimon Peres' take on a two-state solution.
OPINION
July 28, 2012
The Times receives between 500 and 1,000 printable letters each week, of which we publish about 70 among six pages. Though the letters draw plenty of eyeballs, they seldom draw huge volumes of response. But sometimes, a few words of the weekly thousands change that. In his July 22 letter responding to a Times editorial supporting abortion rights, reader Vincent Sheehy wrote: "Sex is for procreation. If a woman does not want to become pregnant, she should refrain from sexual activity.
OPINION
March 26, 2014
Re “Jonah Goldberg,” Opinion, March 25 Six words in the lower right corner of the Opinion section brightened a gloomy morning: “Jonah Goldberg has the day off.” Tom Turnley Santa Ana More letters to the editor ...  
OPINION
May 8, 2013
Re "The Vietnam syndrome," Opinion, May 5 Frank Snepp, a former CIA analyst who was in Vietnam during the fall of Saigon in 1975, worries that we may not have learned the lessons of our war in that country. He may have missed the most important lesson. Vietnam today is a small country that represents no great threat to the United States or its allies. The collapse of South Vietnam didn't lead to falling dominoes or global disaster. We should ponder this outcome when we hear warnings of doom about our withdrawals from Iraq and Afghanistan or our refusal to intervene in Syria.
OPINION
February 16, 2013
Re "GOP prevents a vote on Defense nominee Hagel," Feb. 14 I wondered why Republicans were so against gun control. But after watching them haggle over Chuck Hagel, I see where they would miss shooting themselves in the foot. John L. Uelmen Newbury Park ALSO: Letters: Waiting on Iran Letters: More on 'Lincoln' Mailbag: The Dorner divide
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “Welcome, Professor Bieber,” Opinion, March 25 Fortunately (or unfortunately) we live in a time and place of almost unlimited choices as to what we ingest in both mind and body. We have access to junk food and healthful food, Internet garbage and Internet gems, TV treasures and TV trash. “Reality” and “entertainment” shows fuel our fascination with stardom and almost anyone who is in the public eye. Our obsession with fame has no doubt contributed to the rise in narcissism (think Lance Armstrong and Lindsey Lohan)
OPINION
August 23, 2012
Re "Police find pot plants," Aug. 22 On the front page of Wednesday's LATExtra section, there was a photo of many heavily armed, helmeted police officers. Are they after a murderer? An armed robber? A child molester? Goodness no; they arrested about 100 marijuana plants. I feel so much safer now. Ann Bourman Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Making the call on an eruv Letters: Privacy in the modern world Letters: Teachers, unions and students
OPINION
June 21, 2013
Re "Actor won 3 Emmys as star of 'The Sopranos,'" Obituary, June 20 One wonders how such a brutal character, Tony Soprano, was so appealing and liked by so many. It was James Gandolfini's kind eyes that betrayed him. Ken Johnson Pinon Hills, Calif. ALSO: Letters: Ethical research on chimps Letters: Abortion and the GOP agenda Letters: The problem with obesity advice
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