Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLetters
IN THE NEWS

Letters

OPINION
April 13, 2014
Re "No 'witch hunt' at Mozilla," Column, April 9 It is no wonder that bullying is a major problem at schools. Kids learn from adults. Brendan Eich was bullied into resigning as chief executive of Mozilla. Because he donated $1,000 to the Proposition 8 campaign, he was bullied by people whose personal views differed from his. The "face of a company," as Michael Hiltzik calls a CEO, should refer to the business' product or mission statement. Last time I checked, a CEO has responsibility for the overall success of an organization, and Eich is smart enough to know and abide by that.
Advertisement
OPINION
April 13, 2014
Re "Not a conservative pick," April 11 Steven Colbert is a super-smart comic actor. "Steven Colbert" is a character on TV. Neither would currently be famous without the other. Once one is gone, will the other be worth watching on the "Late Show"? Apparently Colbert and CBS are willing to bet his career on that question. Kelley Willis Venice ALSO: Letters: What children eat at school Letters: Out at Mozilla, but was it fair? Letters: Medicare's problems aren't doctors' fault
OPINION
April 13, 2014
Re "How Medicare pays MDs," Editorial, April 10 It's wrong to blame physicians for Medicare's fiscal woes. Doing away with fee-for-service as a way to "reward quality and efficiency" is unworkable. The federal government could never figure that out. The small, shriveled carrot it would offer as the "reward" would be an insult to the medical profession. Medicare's problems, as evidenced by the testimony of physicians fingered in the recent revelations, have to do with outrageous drug, laboratory and facility charges.
OPINION
April 13, 2014
Re "Out-to-lunch regulators," Editorial, April 8 It's challenging to satisfy one child's palate, let alone 30 million. Yet 90% of schools are meeting the U.S. Department of Agriculture's updated nutrition standards. School cafeterias are no different than our own homes: Americans simply waste too much food. In response, some schools have employed "share tables" where students leave food they will not consume for others. Changing the way Americans eat will not happen overnight.
TRAVEL
April 13, 2014
Vincent Bevins wrote that, "São Paulo was built by immigrants from Italy, Japan, Portugal and Lebanon, among others... " ["Culture by Day, Partying by Night," March 30]. That is quite an interesting tidbit about the place that received the majority of the slaves shipped to the Americas. I suppose they are the "among others. " John Anderson Chicago Airlines horror story We recently returned from Amman, Jordan, using Air France business class to Paris, and experienced a new level of disservice.
OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "Patt Morrison Asks: Jeanie Buss, Laker woman," Opinion, April 9 Asked about Dodger fans' TV discomfort, Lakers President Jeanie Buss said: "We went through that last year…but the deal we did allowed all our games to be in one place. Before, half our games were on Fox and the other half were on KCAL. Each of them had other programming after the game or before. The Laker channel allows us to have pregame and postgame shows, and ancillary programming; it allows people more of a connection with the team.
OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "A crude energy puzzle," April 7 Regarding all the happy talk about the oil trove trapped in the Monterey Shale formation, perhaps there really are billions of barrels in recoverable fossil fuel underneath California. But if we burn the stuff, where exactly should we put the carbon dioxide? Last I heard, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide was greater than 400 parts per million. This is a big science experiment because that is an increase from 270 parts per million before the widespread burning of fossil fuels began.
OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "In free agency we trust," Opinion, April 8 I'm desperately trying to hold on to the quaint notion that college athletes should be students first and foremost. Therefore, I applaud Mark Brilliant's idea of setting up a trust fund that spreads the wealth and yet is also tied in with academic progress. But he leaves out one group that profits most handsomely from the current system and never seems to have to pay for any of it: the owners of professional basketball and football franchises.
OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "More laws, less treasure," Opinion, April 7 As an archaeologist with more than 30 years' experience, I can say that Adam Wallwork's analysis of laws protecting cultural heritage is misguided. Archaeologists don't seek "treasure. " We seek information about how people lived in the past to help us better understand our own existence. Patrimony laws are largely aimed at protecting archaeological sites from destruction by looters. Most sites don't have the "wow" factor needed to become a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but they can provide invaluable information about ancient ways of life.
OPINION
April 11, 2014
Re "Big spenders," Letters, April 8 One letter writer asserts that exposing the Koch brothers' financial involvement in various conservative causes is mudslinging. He claims their political spending is no different than that of major Democratic donors such as George Soros and unions. What the writer fails to acknowledge is that the Kochs fund a web of foundations and organizations created by and for themselves to promote their own views. Their political groups are given populist-sounding names - such as Americans for Prosperity - that distract from their real purpose, which is to protect the Kochs' extraordinary personal fortune.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|