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Leukodystrophy

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NEWS
September 1, 1996 | LISA LEFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No one can say for sure what 10-year-old Jason Hollinger was thinking when he took his first dunk in the ocean Saturday. Like his two brothers, he suffers from a rare neurological disorder that has left him almost paralyzed, unable to eat, walk or speak. But as the Burbank boy sat cradled in his nurse's lap clutching the fistful of sand she had placed there, a wave tumbled over his thin legs and into his face. Jason's eyes widened.
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SCIENCE
July 11, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Italian researchers have used a defanged version of HIV to replace faulty genes - and eliminate devastating symptoms - in children suffering two rare and fatal genetic diseases. Improved gene therapy techniques prevented the onset of metachromatic leukodystrophy in three young children and halted the progression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome in three others. The advance represents a major stride for a field that has struggled to translate experimental successes in lab animals into safe and effective treatments for people, experts said.
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SCIENCE
July 11, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Italian researchers have used a defanged version of HIV to replace faulty genes - and eliminate devastating symptoms - in children suffering two rare and fatal genetic diseases. Improved gene therapy techniques prevented the onset of metachromatic leukodystrophy in three young children and halted the progression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome in three others. The advance represents a major stride for a field that has struggled to translate experimental successes in lab animals into safe and effective treatments for people, experts said.
NEWS
September 1, 1996 | LISA LEFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No one can say for sure what 10-year-old Jason Hollinger was thinking when he took his first dunk in the ocean Saturday. Like his two brothers, he suffers from a rare neurological disorder that has left him almost paralyzed, unable to eat, walk or speak. But as the Burbank boy sat cradled in his nurse's lap clutching the fistful of sand she had placed there, a wave tumbled over his thin legs and into his face. Jason's eyes widened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS
Devin used to be able to walk. Or, perhaps, he was almost able to walk. He was a toddler then. Devin would struggle to his feet, leaning against a sofa. He didn't walk very well or very far, but he managed a few steps. Then, he couldn't do even that. He couldn't get to his feet. Diane and David Hollinger had long feared that something was seriously wrong with their son, ever since the seizure he suffered two weeks after birth. Devin's development had been slow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1996 | LISA LEFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No one can say for sure what 10-year-old Jason Hollinger was thinking when he took his first dunk in the ocean Saturday. Like his two brothers, he suffers from a rare neurological disorder that has left him almost paralyzed, unable to eat, walk or speak. But as the Burbank boy sat cradled in his nurse's lap clutching the fistful of sand she had placed there, a wave tumbled over his thin legs and into his face. Jason's eyes widened.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | REBECCA MAHONEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Last summer, as Shayne and Corey Earley lay curled into commas on the couch, intravenous poles hovering above them, their mother was explaining to a creditor why she couldn't pay her bills again that month. "My boys are dying," Yvette Earley remembers saying. "We're going to lose them both." The creditor, like the others, was unyielding: Pay the money. But there was no money. Yvette and her husband, Lawrence, were on the verge of losing their house.
NEWS
August 30, 1985 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
UCLA researchers who three years ago transplanted bone marrow into an 11-month-old boy with a rare, often fatal disease say that the transplant has been responsible for a significant improvement in the child's neurological development. "We now have evidence that we can change the course of this disease," said Dr. Stephen A. Feig, chief of pediatric hematology-oncology. The doctor cautioned, however, that damage produced by the disease before the transplant may be irreversible.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles video entertainment executive who once headed RCA/Ariola records as well as U.S. operations for the Hertz Corp. was found shot to death along with his wife in their Beverly Hills mansion, authorities said Monday. The bodies of Jose E. Menendez, 45, and Mary Louise (Kitty) Menendez, 44, were discovered in their North Elm Drive home by their two college-age sons, who had been out for the evening. Police received a 911 call from one of them at 11:47 p.m.
SPORTS
February 22, 1998 | BUCKY GLEASON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The stories are bound in three-ring notebooks and sorted in the basement of Jim Kelly's home. They are individual tales of misery and prayers of hope. They come by the thousands in letter form for Hunter James Kelly, the ailing son of the former Buffalo Bills quarterback. The two shared a birthday on Valentine's Day, Hunter's first birthday and possibly his last. "You thank God every time you wake up in the morning and your son is there," Kelly said.
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