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October 3, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
New research shows that a combination of two drugs given after surgery substantially reduces the death rate for patients with advanced colon cancer, the National Cancer Institute announced Monday. "This is a major advance," Dr. Samuel Broder, director of the cancer institute, said at a press conference. "The results suggest we might be able to reduce the death rate by as much as one-third."
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NEWS
September 12, 1993 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In more ways than one, it was an act of faith for Dr. Charles Moertel to rise, late in the morning on Sept. 28, 1989, before a dozen people seated around a National Cancer Institute conference table in Rockville, Md. The cautious Mayo Clinic cancer researcher, a former president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, had come to the NCI to describe a set of extraordinary test results.
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NEWS
April 19, 1990 | SHAWN POGATCHNIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A third of the approximately 50,000 Americans who die each year from post-surgery recurrences of colon cancer could enjoy longer lives if they received a newly approved chemotherapy technique, a panel of medical experts meeting at the National Institutes of Health said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | SHAWN POGATCHNIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A third of the approximately 50,000 Americans who die each year from post-surgery recurrences of colon cancer could enjoy longer lives if they received a newly approved chemotherapy technique, a panel of medical experts meeting at the National Institutes of Health said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New research confirms that an innovative treatment combining chemotherapy with an anti-parasite drug reduces deaths among victims of advanced colon cancer, according to a report released last week. The combined drug treatment cut by one-third the death rate among patients in a nationwide study of 929 people whose colon cancers had spread to their lymph nodes, the new study found. The drugs also reduced relapse rates among those patients by 41%, said Dr.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In more ways than one, it was an act of faith for Dr. Charles Moertel to rise, late in the morning on Sept. 28, 1989, before a dozen people seated around a National Cancer Institute conference table in Rockville, Md. The cautious Mayo Clinic cancer researcher, a former president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, had come to the NCI to describe a set of extraordinary test results.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
"Silence Equals Death," read the buttons worn by the busload of protesters who descended on the National Institutes of Health last February to demand access to an experimental AIDS drug that showed promise but had not yet been thoroughly tested. After a two-hour meeting, Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the NIH official responsible for all federal AIDS research and a scientist that the protesters had once labeled a "murderer" and a "Nazi," surprised the protesters by promising to intervene on their behalf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New research confirms that an innovative treatment combining chemotherapy with an anti-parasite drug reduces deaths among victims of advanced colon cancer, according to a report released last week. The combined drug treatment cut by one-third the death rate among patients in a nationwide study of 929 people whose colon cancers had spread to their lymph nodes, the new study found. The drugs also reduced relapse rates among those patients by 41%, said Dr.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
New research shows that a combination of two drugs given after surgery substantially reduces the death rate for patients with advanced colon cancer, the National Cancer Institute announced Monday. "This is a major advance," Dr. Samuel Broder, director of the cancer institute, said at a press conference. "The results suggest we might be able to reduce the death rate by as much as one-third."
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