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Levi Kingston

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1988 | Bob Baker, Baker is a Times staff writer. and
It looked like any old grand opening. Balloons and people in business suits. They had come to the corner of Hoover and 32nd streets near USC to christen a new day-care center for children of low-income families, to admire the fresh tan stucco and bright green metal framing of the building. But there was something special going on here too. Unofficially, it was Levi Kingston Day.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2010 | Hector Tobar
Levi Kingston grew up in L.A.'s old Central Avenue district during its glory days. His father was a bellman at the historic, black-run Dunbar Hotel when W.E.B. DuBois and Duke Ellington stayed there. Over the years, Kingston's been a jazz musician, a merchant marine, an activist in the civil rights and peace movements, and a tireless advocate for the working parents of South L.A. Now Kingston, 71, is a child care provider hit hard by California's state budget impasse.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2010 | Hector Tobar
Levi Kingston grew up in L.A.'s old Central Avenue district during its glory days. His father was a bellman at the historic, black-run Dunbar Hotel when W.E.B. DuBois and Duke Ellington stayed there. Over the years, Kingston's been a jazz musician, a merchant marine, an activist in the civil rights and peace movements, and a tireless advocate for the working parents of South L.A. Now Kingston, 71, is a child care provider hit hard by California's state budget impasse.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | JAKE DOHERTY, Levi Kingston is founder and chairman of the board of the Hoover Intergenerational Care Inc./Child & Development Center and chief executive officer of the Community Consortium Inc., a coalition in the Hoover-Exposition area focusing on housing, education, economic development, crime prevention and health care issues. Kingston was interviewed by Jake Doherty. and
My involvement with child care began through a concern with housing issues. Our contention was that housing wasn't just four walls and a roof. Affordable housing has to be looked at in terms of the services it provides for families. Right now, the Hoover Intergenerational Care Inc. / Child & Development Center and the Omar Ibn Al Khattab Islamic Foundation are involved in a joint housing venture called the Hoover / Exposition Community Development Corp.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | JAKE DOHERTY, Levi Kingston is founder and chairman of the board of the Hoover Intergenerational Care Inc./Child & Development Center and chief executive officer of the Community Consortium Inc., a coalition in the Hoover-Exposition area focusing on housing, education, economic development, crime prevention and health care issues. Kingston was interviewed by Jake Doherty. and
My involvement with child care began through a concern with housing issues. Our contention was that housing wasn't just four walls and a roof. Affordable housing has to be looked at in terms of the services it provides for families. Right now, the Hoover Intergenerational Care Inc. / Child & Development Center and the Omar Ibn Al Khattab Islamic Foundation are involved in a joint housing venture called the Hoover / Exposition Community Development Corp.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
For the third consecutive year, South-Central-based Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion has contributed $25,000 to nonprofit educational and community service programs in the area. Third-time recipients Hoover Intergenerational Center and the United Neighborhood Council, as well as Hope in Youth, Girls Inc., Central Recovery and Development Ministry and the National Conference of Christians and Jews benefited from the college's gifts.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a nation with an appetite for bite-size information, an abundance of marketing acumen and a propensity for collecting the oddest things, surely there is room for "The Rodney King Beating" trading cards. At least, that's the rationale of Eclipse Enterprises, a Northern California trading-card company. Eclipse has included four bonus cards related to the King case in its 110-card True Crime II series, a sequel to the first True Crime cards featuring serial killers, gangsters, G-men, desperadoes and law enforcement notables.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the quake-damaged Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum remains closed during the upcoming football season, the economic effects will be devastating for the city government and neighborhoods surrounding the historic stadium, economists and officials say. The Raiders and the USC Trojans draw hundreds of thousands of fans, many of whom are the lifeblood for local businesses that can directly link more than half of their annual income to football games.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | ERIN J. AUBRY
For 30 years it was a Louisiana-flavored fixture on the eastern tip of the Crenshaw District, a lively neighborhood eatery where owner Aquilla Jase cooked up $5 bowls of gumbo for friends gathered in his "living room" on Exposition Boulevard. But after the 69-year-old Jase's death in October, Sid's Jase's Cafe locked its doors and grew uncharacteristically silent, taking on the imperiled, untended look of too many South-Central Los Angeles businesses. Now Sid's may be making a comeback.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As commuters have digested the fact that they have no choice but to come down from the trestles that for decades have carried them over the urban grid, many for the first time will glimpse an unfamiliar L.A. During the past two weeks, people waiting for elevators, over dinner tables or in line at the supermarket have begun to trade routes and guarded shortcuts. They compare them like top-of-the-line consumer items, speculating over which will provide the best performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1988 | Bob Baker, Baker is a Times staff writer. and
It looked like any old grand opening. Balloons and people in business suits. They had come to the corner of Hoover and 32nd streets near USC to christen a new day-care center for children of low-income families, to admire the fresh tan stucco and bright green metal framing of the building. But there was something special going on here too. Unofficially, it was Levi Kingston Day.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT and MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As two high-flying investment groups try to sell the NFL on rival stadium sites for L.A.'s next pro team, working-class neighbors in Carson and around Exposition Park are watching the process from afar with a mixture of disenfranchisement, uncertainty and blind hope. The shadow of a billion-dollar NFL stadium deal looms over 72-year-old Hubert Wright's mobile home in Carson like a charging lineman. But Wright couldn't care less. "Football stadium?
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