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Levon Helm

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2012
The Band singer and drummer Levon Helm is in the final stages of cancer, according to a note posted on his website Tuesday by his wife, Sandy, and daughter, Amy. "Please send your prayers and love to him as he makes his way through this part of his journey," the note said. "Thank you fans and music lovers who have made his life so filled with joy and celebration . . . he has loved nothing more than to play, to fill the room up with music, lay down the back beat, and make the people dance!
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2013 | By David Colker, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Singer Jackie Lomax will perhaps be most remembered for what didn't happen during his long career. Despite several brushes with fame - and solo recordings featuring no less than Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton and Levon Helm backing him - Lomax never became a star. He never had anything close to a hit album, despite admiration for his wide-ranging, bluesy vocals. Harrison even wrote a song for him, "Sour Milk Sea," that was released as a single, and that went nowhere too. But Lomax, who played numerous concerts in the Ojai area where he'd lived in recent years, seemed to take it in stride.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2008 | Paul Lieberman
It was a good thing, after all, that Levon Helm stayed home from the Grammys, where he won in the best traditional folk category for "Dirt Farmer," his comeback album following throat cancer, and also picked up a lifetime achievement award for being part of the Band. It turns out the Woodstock, N.Y.-based crooning drummer was a three-time winner over the weekend: His daughter Amy gave birth Saturday night, a month ahead of schedule, to his first grandchild, a boy. -- Paul Lieberman
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Loose and ragtag, stirring and poignant, the documentary "Ain't in It for My Health: A Film About Levon Helm" proves a fitting tribute to its late star, perhaps best known as the singer-drummer of the influential late-1960s and '70s folk-rock group the Band. Shot mainly in and around Helm's Woodstock, N.Y., farmhouse and recording studio, director Jacob Hatley's twilight-time portrait evocatively captures the ailing yet genial musician - he died of throat cancer last year at age 71 - as he assembles his comeback album, the Grammy Award-winning "Dirt Farmer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Levon Helm is most widely known for the songs he sang that found their way onto the pop charts during his long tenure as drummer and singer for the Band: "Up On Cripple Creek," "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" and "Don't Do It," earthy and infectious conglomerations of gospel, country, blues, folk and rock music. But the one that might crystallize his approach to music throughout his life was "The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show," an ode to the kind of freewheeling gatherings in which the musician, who died of cancer Thursday at 71 in New York, thoroughly reveled.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Loose and ragtag, stirring and poignant, the documentary "Ain't in It for My Health: A Film About Levon Helm" proves a fitting tribute to its late star, perhaps best known as the singer-drummer of the influential late-1960s and '70s folk-rock group the Band. Shot mainly in and around Helm's Woodstock, N.Y., farmhouse and recording studio, director Jacob Hatley's twilight-time portrait evocatively captures the ailing yet genial musician - he died of throat cancer last year at age 71 - as he assembles his comeback album, the Grammy Award-winning "Dirt Farmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Levon Helm didn't do an overwhelming amount of drumming Thursday at the Palomino--a second drummer provided most of the rhythm--but the grinning, tousled, ruggedly handsome ex-Band member did at least keep his hands consistently busy during the informal, good-time set before a hooting and hollering crowd. Pain from an old foot injury reportedly keeps Helm from doing as much drumming as he'd like to.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
The "Beware of Bear" signs outside Levon Helm's home and studio are not a joke. A real black bear made itself all too comfortable the summer before last, somehow squeezing through a doggy door and heading to the kitchen, then the "big room," where they stage the Midnight Rambles. It was making angry, pounding noises while the supposed master of the house huddled behind another door with his gun, "praying, 'Please go. Please go.'
BOOKS
November 21, 1993 | John Schulian, John Schulian, a television writer and producer who was a rock columnist in Baltimore 20 years ago, fell in love with music the day he bought his first 45, "Since I Met You Baby" by Ivory Joe Hunter
They found Richard Manuel hanging in the bathroom, deader than all the bottles of Grand Marnier he had drained in his tortured life, deader than all the bankrupt rock-and-roll dreams that had led him to this motel in Winter Park, Fla. Not many hours before, he had closed the Cheek-to-Cheek Lounge by singing "You Don't Know Me" in a voice that ached with loneliness and regret. It was the way he had sounded even when suicide wasn't an option.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008
I would like to start this by congratulating Levon Helm on his Grammy win for "Dirt Farmer." It's nice to see him in his element again ["Levon Helm Is Still Ready for the Load," Feb. 10]. That being said, I am sick of having Levon Helm's stale bitterness chronicled. The sensationalizing of his wild allegations that my father, Robbie Robertson, "hogged" songwriting credit [in the Band] is reprehensible. I realize that only those five guys will know what went on between them, but I am stunned that nobody has bothered to state the obvious.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By August Brown
This year's Grammys were all about pushing authenticity, and how often that's just another kind of performance. But from the audience, two moments underlined the difference between sincerity as a kind of fashion statement, and when it's the real thing. Just before the Denver folk-revival trio the Lumineers went on to play their chart-busting but cloying single “Ho Hey,” a production assistant felt a bit nervous about the crowd's potential response. “OK, everyone,” he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012
One of the last studio recordings by Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member Levon Helm was also one of the closest to his heart. Helm, his longtime friend and producer Larry Campbell and a crew of musicians and technicians recorded the rhythm track for the new Amnesty International 50th anniversary commemorative song "Toast to Freedom" last summer and helped recruit Ewan McGregor, Kris Kristofferson, Warren Haynes, Keb Mo, Carly Simon, Taj Mahal, Marianne...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Levon Helm is most widely known for the songs he sang that found their way onto the pop charts during his long tenure as drummer and singer for the Band: "Up On Cripple Creek," "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" and "Don't Do It," earthy and infectious conglomerations of gospel, country, blues, folk and rock music. But the one that might crystallize his approach to music throughout his life was "The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show," an ode to the kind of freewheeling gatherings in which the musician, who died of cancer Thursday at 71 in New York, thoroughly reveled.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2012
The Band singer and drummer Levon Helm is in the final stages of cancer, according to a note posted on his website Tuesday by his wife, Sandy, and daughter, Amy. "Please send your prayers and love to him as he makes his way through this part of his journey," the note said. "Thank you fans and music lovers who have made his life so filled with joy and celebration . . . he has loved nothing more than to play, to fill the room up with music, lay down the back beat, and make the people dance!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008
I enjoyed Paul Lieberman's article on Levon Helm ["Levon Helm Is Still Ready for the Load," Feb. 10] as I sat in sunny West Virginia waiting to see the Grammy Awards. I certainly hope he wins in the traditional folk category. I think one reason I hope he wins is because my husband, Tracy Schwarz, wrote the lead song, "Poor Old Dirt Farmer," back in the '60s as he was plowing his dry, dusty fields in south-central Pennsylvania. It is not "traditional," as stated on Levon's CD.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008
I would like to start this by congratulating Levon Helm on his Grammy win for "Dirt Farmer." It's nice to see him in his element again ["Levon Helm Is Still Ready for the Load," Feb. 10]. That being said, I am sick of having Levon Helm's stale bitterness chronicled. The sensationalizing of his wild allegations that my father, Robbie Robertson, "hogged" songwriting credit [in the Band] is reprehensible. I realize that only those five guys will know what went on between them, but I am stunned that nobody has bothered to state the obvious.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1985
Since Craig Lee's review of the Green on Red record (L.A. Sound, April 28) places emphasis on the word "American" ("resonating with echoes of other great American rock groups: the Band, Neil Young & Crazy Horse, the Doors"), it should be pointed out that the Band (except Levon Helm) and Neil Young are from Canada. FRED JANSSEN Downey
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1988 | TERRY ATKINSON
"Elvis '56." Media. $19.95. This is the hourlong documentary that Cinemax cable presented in late '87, and while it overlaps other compilations--containing some of the same TV appearances, for instance--its particular focus and tone make it one of the best. Producers Alan and Susan Raymond did a superb job of gathering material, including previously unseen still photos and tape recordings, which are skillfully matched. Flavorfully narrated by Levon Helm, "Elvis '56" is a must for his fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2008 | Paul Lieberman
It was a good thing, after all, that Levon Helm stayed home from the Grammys, where he won in the best traditional folk category for "Dirt Farmer," his comeback album following throat cancer, and also picked up a lifetime achievement award for being part of the Band. It turns out the Woodstock, N.Y.-based crooning drummer was a three-time winner over the weekend: His daughter Amy gave birth Saturday night, a month ahead of schedule, to his first grandchild, a boy. -- Paul Lieberman
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
The "Beware of Bear" signs outside Levon Helm's home and studio are not a joke. A real black bear made itself all too comfortable the summer before last, somehow squeezing through a doggy door and heading to the kitchen, then the "big room," where they stage the Midnight Rambles. It was making angry, pounding noises while the supposed master of the house huddled behind another door with his gun, "praying, 'Please go. Please go.'
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