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Lew Ayres

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NEWS
December 31, 1996 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Lew Ayres, who starred in the Academy Award-winning classic "All Quiet on the Western Front"--and who was a reluctant warrior in life as well as on film--died Monday. He was 88. Ayres died in his sleep after being in a coma for several days, said Diana Ayres, his wife of 31 years. A personable if unspectacular leading man, Ayres was perhaps best known for his title roles in a series of Dr. Kildare movies in the late 1930s and early '40s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
This week is an ideal one to check out the tremendous resource that is the UCLA Film and Television Archive, which screens films at the Billy Wilder Theater at the Hammer Museum in Westwood. Playing Friday night is a nifty pre-Code double bill, William Powell in "Street of Chance" and Lew Ayres in "Okay, America!" And Wednesday, as part of its "The Movie That Inspired Me" series, top cinematographer Roger Deakins talks to Curtis Hanson about Jean-Pierre Melville's masterful "Army of Shadows."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
This week is an ideal one to check out the tremendous resource that is the UCLA Film and Television Archive, which screens films at the Billy Wilder Theater at the Hammer Museum in Westwood. Playing Friday night is a nifty pre-Code double bill, William Powell in "Street of Chance" and Lew Ayres in "Okay, America!" And Wednesday, as part of its "The Movie That Inspired Me" series, top cinematographer Roger Deakins talks to Curtis Hanson about Jean-Pierre Melville's masterful "Army of Shadows."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1997
Re the passing of Lew Ayres, Dec. 31: He and I served together in the 36th Evacuation Hospital from 1943 to the end of the war. Although a conscientious objector, he saw more action than many an infantry soldier, participating in three D-Day invasions including Leyte Gulf. (MacArthur: "I have returned.") We had many Japanese prisoners of war in our field hospital at Palo, Leyte, who were in terrible physical condition. Lew was the only one who tended to them and showed sympathy and compassion to the enemy, thus practicing what he preached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1990
Marine Cpl. Kenneth Turner, a 22-year-old Michigan native, has applied for an honorable discharge from the Marine Corps as a conscientious objector. He contends that he has recently undergone a spiritual "reawakening" that makes it impossible for him to perform any military duty because to do so would be to support the efforts of a military machine. Perhaps Turner has never seen or heard of Lew Ayres. Now in his 80s, Ayres can still be seen occasionally on television or in reruns of his old movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1991 | PAT H. BROESKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's best known as an actor whose career has spanned more than six decades and countless film and TV credits. But Lew Ayres--who had his most popular role as the title character in the "Dr. Kildare" movies of the late '30s and early '40s--has another identity. It was as Lew Ayres, filmmaker and student of religion, that he addressed about 200 people at Thursday night's showing of his 2 1/2-hour documentary, "Altars of the World: The Great Religions of Man."
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost 50 years, Sam Dierinzo had wanted to say thank you. The Northridge man got his chance Sunday at a seniors gathering at Century City Hospital. The guest speaker at that event, an old-fashioned ice-cream social and information fair sponsored by the hospital and the Westside Consortium of Senior Services, was actor Lew Ayres, 81. Most people know Ayres as Hollywood's original Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1997
Re the passing of Lew Ayres, Dec. 31: He and I served together in the 36th Evacuation Hospital from 1943 to the end of the war. Although a conscientious objector, he saw more action than many an infantry soldier, participating in three D-Day invasions including Leyte Gulf. (MacArthur: "I have returned.") We had many Japanese prisoners of war in our field hospital at Palo, Leyte, who were in terrible physical condition. Lew was the only one who tended to them and showed sympathy and compassion to the enemy, thus practicing what he preached.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1990
Think for a moment, Mr. Gardner, of those moments of magic and beauty on the silver screen: the goodby scene between Ava Gardner and Gregory Peck in "On the Beach"; Henry Fonda doing the two-step in "My Darling Clemintine"; Lew Ayres reaching for the flower in "All Quiet on the Western Front"; Sophie making her choice; Laurel and Hardy just looking into the camera. Each scene a portrait as lovely as a Van Gogh, as lyrical as Mozart and as moving as a Shelley sonnet. Be an optimist, Mr. Gardner--look under all that Hollywood manure and once in a while you'll find a pony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1986
Glidden criticizes animal liberationists as hypocrites for emphasizing laboratory research as a first priority. In this he fails to distinguish between an abrupt stroke of death and slow extermination by way of the torture chamber. In nature, many life forms prey upon each other, but in only the rarest cases does the victim (usually a simple organism) have to endure extended torment. In the medical laboratory, highly evolved species must frequently undergo excruciating ordeals of physical pain for hours, days, weeks or months--without knowing why. If a hypothetical super-race offered such a choice to any one of us, few, indeed, would select any option but instant death.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Lew Ayres, who starred in the Academy Award-winning classic "All Quiet on the Western Front"--and who was a reluctant warrior in life as well as on film--died Monday. He was 88. Ayres died in his sleep after being in a coma for several days, said Diana Ayres, his wife of 31 years. A personable if unspectacular leading man, Ayres was perhaps best known for his title roles in a series of Dr. Kildare movies in the late 1930s and early '40s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1991 | PAT H. BROESKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's best known as an actor whose career has spanned more than six decades and countless film and TV credits. But Lew Ayres--who had his most popular role as the title character in the "Dr. Kildare" movies of the late '30s and early '40s--has another identity. It was as Lew Ayres, filmmaker and student of religion, that he addressed about 200 people at Thursday night's showing of his 2 1/2-hour documentary, "Altars of the World: The Great Religions of Man."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1990
Marine Cpl. Kenneth Turner, a 22-year-old Michigan native, has applied for an honorable discharge from the Marine Corps as a conscientious objector. He contends that he has recently undergone a spiritual "reawakening" that makes it impossible for him to perform any military duty because to do so would be to support the efforts of a military machine. Perhaps Turner has never seen or heard of Lew Ayres. Now in his 80s, Ayres can still be seen occasionally on television or in reruns of his old movies.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost 50 years, Sam Dierinzo had wanted to say thank you. The Northridge man got his chance Sunday at a seniors gathering at Century City Hospital. The guest speaker at that event, an old-fashioned ice-cream social and information fair sponsored by the hospital and the Westside Consortium of Senior Services, was actor Lew Ayres, 81. Most people know Ayres as Hollywood's original Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2006
Spectators and fans gathered in Los Angeles Superior Court when Ginger Rogers appeared to ask for a divorce from her second husband, actor-director Lew Ayres. The divorce made the front page of the Los Angeles Times the next day -- the detailed account describing her clothes (black wool dress suit, black shoes and hat, black gloves) and a partial transcript of her testimony, in which she described how her husband "continually criticized me, my friends and my work."
NEWS
September 19, 1996
Joan Perry, a motion picture actress of the 1930s who was widowed by Columbia Studios President Harry Cohn, has died. She was 85. Perry died Sunday of emphysema at her Santa Barbara estate. Born Elizabeth Rosiland Miller in Pensacola, Fla., Perry began acting in class plays in Tampa. She was a model until she was discovered by Hollywood. Signed to Columbia in 1935 at the same time as actress Rita Hayworth, Perry was told by studio chief Cohn: "Hayworth will be a star, and you'll be my wife."
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