Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLew Grade
IN THE NEWS

Lew Grade

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996 | David Gritten, David Gritten, based in England, is a frequent contributor to Calendar
He will be 90 on Christmas Day, but Lew Grade does not encourage people to pigeonhole him as the world's oldest film producer. "So what?" he says with a shrug. "I don't feel more than 40--which is what matters." He works like a 40-year-old too. Grade, who is a life peer and thus entitled to sit and vote in the House of Lords and use the title Lord Grade, arrives promptly at his Mayfair office at 7 a.m. each weekday and works a minimum 10 hours.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain's flamboyant film and television entrepreneur Lord Lew Grade has died at age 91, apparently as a result of heart failure, British media reported Sunday. Grade made his name producing such worldwide television hits as the epic "Jesus of Nazareth" and the zany "Muppet Show," which at its peak in the 1970s reached a weekly audience of 235 million viewers in 11 countries.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain's flamboyant film and television entrepreneur Lord Lew Grade has died at age 91, apparently as a result of heart failure, British media reported Sunday. Grade made his name producing such worldwide television hits as the epic "Jesus of Nazareth" and the zany "Muppet Show," which at its peak in the 1970s reached a weekly audience of 235 million viewers in 11 countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996 | David Gritten, David Gritten, based in England, is a frequent contributor to Calendar
He will be 90 on Christmas Day, but Lew Grade does not encourage people to pigeonhole him as the world's oldest film producer. "So what?" he says with a shrug. "I don't feel more than 40--which is what matters." He works like a 40-year-old too. Grade, who is a life peer and thus entitled to sit and vote in the House of Lords and use the title Lord Grade, arrives promptly at his Mayfair office at 7 a.m. each weekday and works a minimum 10 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Susan King
There's never been a TV series quite like "The Prisoner," which premiered in England in 1967 and debuted in the U.S. the summer of 1968 on CBS. Best described as James Bond meets George Orwell filtered through Franz Kafka, the cult series revolved around a British secret agent (Patrick McGoohan) who wants to resign from the service. Deemed too dangerous to retire, they kidnap him and send him to an idyllic, though completely isolated, seaside resort called the Village. There residents are assigned numbers instead of names and their every movement is followed by monitoring systems and security forces.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1999 | MARK SAYLOR
After 25 years of selling movie rights to markets around the world, Julia Palau has quietly emerged as one of the most powerful women in the independent film business. Palau, majority owner and CEO of J&M Entertainment, the London-based company she co-founded in 1978, is in the rare ranks of those movie executives who personally have the authority to green-light a slate of movies. Yet she is little known in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2006 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
PHILIP Anschutz made his first big splash in Hollywood five years ago when he cut a deal considered outlandish even by movie industry standards. The Denver industrialist not only agreed to pay $10 million per book for rights to the best-selling Dirk Pitt adventure novels, he gave author Clive Cussler extraordinary creative control over "Sahara," the movie starring Matthew McConaughey and Penelope Cruz.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
When Jerry Lewis won the Jack Oakie Award last year, he took every opportunity to tell us how great he is, or was. This year Paul Mazursky got the award. He didn't tell us why. He showed us. The award, established in 1981, is given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Academy Foundation for comedy in film. Awards are always a chancy proposition, particularly in the entertainment industry, which preens in formalized self-congratulation.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
Lew and Edie Wasserman celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday night--and had 700 of their closest friends over to a dazzler of a Hollywood event. "The next time, they can't just take over the studio. They'll have to take over a country," quipped their longtime buddy, Mickey Ziffren, to her husband, Paul. The guest list was astronomical--as in stars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Dwight Arlington Hemion, a television director and producer best known for his musical specials who won 18 Emmy Awards and was nominated a record 47 times, died Monday at his home in Rectortown, Va. He was 81. The cause was renal failure, his wife, Kit, said. In television specials starring Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, Mikhail Baryshnikov and many other world-class performers, Hemion and his partner, producer Gary Smith, captured popular and critical acclaim.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Starlight Express" docked at the Gershwin Theatre Sunday night after a long run in London. It is a horrid show. But not an inept one. It knows exactly what it's doing. That's what makes you uneasy. It suggests that Broadway has just about given up on old-fashioned hand-tooled human-sized theater and intends to specialize in computerized musical spectacles designed, literally, to run "now and forever."
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its 40-year history, ITC Entertainment Group has gone from the heights of producing Academy Award winners such as "Sophie's Choice" and "On Golden Pond" to more recent B-movies such as the "Stepfather" slasher films. In headier days, the Studio City company was one of the world's leading independent entertainment firms and once counted among its treasures the Beatles music catalogue.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|